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Full text of "Bulletin of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinofuniver19641965 







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The University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro 

'Bulletins* 



Catalogue Issue for the Year 1963-1964 

^Announcements for 1964-1965 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY AT GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER AT THE POST OFFICE 

AT GREENSBORO* NORTH CAROLINA, FEBRUARY 24, 1936 

UNDER ACT OF CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912 



















1964 




JANUARY 

SMTWTFS 
12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 II 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 
S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 II 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


MARCH 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 II 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


APRIL 

SMTWTFS 
12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 II 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 II 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


JUNE 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 II 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


JULY 

SMTWTFS 
12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 II 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


AUGUST 

SMTWTFS 
1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 II 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


SEPTEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 II 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
II 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


NOVEMBER 

SMTWTFS 
12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 II 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


DECEMBER 
SMTWTFS 
12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 II 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20.21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29-30 31 


























I 


1965 




JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 II 12 13 14 15 16 
17 13 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 II 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 


MARCH 

SMTWTFS 
12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 II 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


APRIL 

SMTWTFS 
1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
II 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 

S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 II 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


JUNE 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 II 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


JULY 

SMTWTFS 
1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
II 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


AUGUST 

SMTWTFS 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 II 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 II 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 II 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


NOVEMBER 

SMTWTFS 
12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 II 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


DECEMBER 

SMTWTFS 
12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 II 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 

















COLLEGE CALENDAR 

1964-65 Session 



1964 

Sept. 10, Thurs. — 5:00 p.m. 

Sept. 11, Fri.— 7:00 p.m. 
Sept. 12, Sat.— 9:00 a.m. 
Sept. 14, Mon.— 8:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m. 
Mon.— 3:00-5:00 p.m. 

Mon. 



Sept. 15, Tues. — 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

Tues.— 1:30-3:30 p.m. 
Sept. 16, Wed. — 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Sept. 17, Thurs.— 8:00 a.m. 

Sept. 24, Thurs. 

Oct. 4, Sun. — 3:00 p.m. 

Oct. 5, Mon. 

Oct. 17, Sat. 

Oct. 31, Fri. 

Nov. 25, Wed.— 1:00 p.m. 
Nov. 30, Mon.— 8:00 a.m. 
Nov. 30, Dec. 11, Mon.-Fri. 
Dec. 2, Wed. 

Dec. 18, Fri.— 1:00 p.m. 

1965 

Jan. 4, Mon. — 8:00 a.m. 

Jan. 16, Sat. 

Jan. 18, Mon. 

Jan. 19-27, Tues.-Wed. 

Jan. 27, Wed. 



First Semester 

Orientation Program for all new undergraduate 
students 

Faculty Meeting 

Advising and Registration of Graduate Students 

Advising Freshmen, Transfers 

Advising Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors (Not pre- 
registered and students with schedule problems) 

Examinations to remove Condition (E) grades and 
Special Examinations for credit 

Registration of Freshmen and Nursing Students 

Registration of Commercial Students 

Completion of registration for sophomores, juniors, 
and seniors 

Instruction begins 

Last day to change courses or course sections 

Nursing Education Graduation 

Founders Day 

Last day to drop courses without penalty of having 
a WF grade recorded automatically 

Six weeks' Unsatisfactory Progress Reports due in 
the Registrar's Office 

Instruction ends for Thanksgiving Holidays 

Instruction resumes 

Spring Semester Registration 

Last day to apply for Special Examinations for 
credit and Examinations to remove Condition (E) 
grades 

Instruction ends for Christmas Holidays 



Instruction resumes 

Last day of classes in First Semester 

Reading Day 

Final Examinations 

End of First Semester 



T0 0Q/1Q 



Second Semester 



Jan. 30, Sat. — 9:00 a.m. 
Feb. 1, Mon.— 9:30-1:00 p.m. 

Feb. 2, Tues.— 9:30-11:30 a.m. 
Feb. 2, Tues.— 8:00 a.m. 
Feb. 9, Tues. 
Feb. 11, Thurs. 

Feb. 27, Sat. 

Mar. 19, Fri. 

Apr. 10, Sat. — 12:00 noon 

Apr. 20, Tues. — 8:00 a.m. 

Apr. 26-May 8 (2 wks.), Mon.-Sat. 

Apr. 21, Wed. 

Apr. 26, Mon. 
May 1, Sat. 
May 5, Wed. 
May 12, Wed. 

May 25, Tues. 

May 26, Wed. 

May 2 7- June 4, Thurs.-Fri. 

June 4, Fri. 

June 5, 6 — Sat.-Sun. 



Advising and Registration of Graduate Students 

Registration of students not completing Pre- 
registration 

Registration for Commercial Students 

Classes begin for Second Semester 

Last day to change courses or course sections 

Last day for payment of diploma fee for 1965 
Masters' degree candidates 

Last day to drop a course without penalty of WF 
grade 

Six Weeks Unsatisfactory Progress Reports due in 
the Registrar's Office 

Instruction ends for Spring Holidays 

Instruction resumes 

Pre-registration for 1965 First Semester 

Last day to apply for Special Examination for 
credit and Examinations to remove Condition 
(E) grades 

Last day for filing completed Master's theses with 
Examining Committee 

Last day to apply for Student Teaching during 
1965-66 

Final date for oral and written examinations of 
June candidates for Master's degree 

Final date for complete clearance of June candi- 
dates for Master's degrees, including deposit of 
theses in Graduate School Office 

Last Day of Classes, Second Semester 

Reading Day 

Final Examinations 

Commercial Students' Commencement 

Sff-.TM 

Commencement Activities 



June 10, Thurs. 
June 11, Fri. 
June 12, Sat. 
June 26, Sat. 
July 17, Sat. 



1965 Summer Session 

Registration 

Instruction begins 

Classes meet 

Classes meet 

End of six weeks' session 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 
Calendar 3 

Officers of Administration 6 

I. The University 11 

II. Expenses 27 

III. Financial Aid 35 

IV. Admission 49 

V. Degrees 59 

VI. Academic Regulations 89 

VII. Courses of Instruction 107 

VIII. The Graduate School 217 

IX. Statistical Summaries 241 

X. Organization 245 

Trustees 247 

Officers of Instruction 248 

Faculty Committees 272 

Index 275 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
(General Administrative Officers at Chapel Hill) 

By act of the General Assembly of 1931 the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, the North Carolina College for Women at 
Greensboro (renamed the Woman's College of the University of North 
Carolina), and the North Carolina State College of Agriculture and 
Engineering at Raleigh were consolidated into The University of North 
Carolina. 

By act of the General Assembly of 1963 the names of two of the 
institutions within the Consolidated University were changed: The 
Woman's College of the University of North Carolina was changed to 
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; North Carolina State 
College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh was changed to 
North Carolina State of the University of North Carolina at Raleigh. 
The name of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill remained 
the same. 

The administrative officers of The University of North Carolina are: 

William Clyde Friday, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., President 

Donald Benton Anderson, B.A., B.Sc.Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs 

Dr. Arnold K. King, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President for Insti- 
tutional Studies 

Alexander Hurlbutt Shepard, Jr., B.A., M.A., Business Officer and 
Treasurer 

Frederick Henry Weaver, B.A., M.A., Vice President for Adminis- 
stration 

The Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research, working with 
the University Graduate Executive Council and the three Deans of the 
Graduate School, has the responsibility for the co-ordination and direc- 
tion of the graduate offerings and research programs of the University. 

The Business Officer and Treasurer has the responsibility of over-all 
supervision of the preparation of the University budget requests and 
the expenditure of authorized budgets. This officer is also responsible 
for the administration within the University of those enactments of 
the General Assemblies that relate to the classification of personnel 
under the State Personnel Act. 

The Secretary of the University performs general administrative 
duties and is the principal liaison officer with the Board of Trustees. 

Each of these officers and the Chancellors of the component institu- 
tions are responsible to the President as the principal executive officer 
of the University of North Carolina. 



Officers 

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
AT GREENSBORO 

Chancellor 

Otis Arnold Singletary, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Academic Affairs 

Dean of the Faculty 

Mereb Ethna Mossman, B.A., M.A., L.H.D. 

Associate Dean 

Tommie Lou Smith, B.A., M.A. 

Graduate School 
James Sharbrough Ferguson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean 

School of Education 

Kenneth Edwin Howe, B.A., M.S., Ed.D., Dean 

School of Home Economics 

Naomi Albanese, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean 

School of Music 

Lee Rigsby, B.M., M.M., Ph.D., Dean 

Summer Session 

John Wesley Kennedy, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

Extension 

Clarence Olan Shipton, B.A., M.Ed., Director 

Library 

Charles Marshall Adams, B.A., B.S., M.A., Librarian 

Office of Registration and Records 

Howard Hoyt Price, B.S., M.A., Registrar 

Office of Admissions 

Sadye Elizabeth Dunn, B.S., Certificate in Business Administra- 
tion, Director 
Margery Davis Braswell, B.A., M.A., Assistant Director 

Student Affairs 

Dean of Students 

Katherine Henrietta Taylor, B.A., M.A. 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Student Health Services 

Olivia Abernethy, M.D., College Physician 

Student Aid Director 

Kathleen Pettit Hawkins, C.C. 

Religious Activities 

Katherine Taylor, Co-ordinator 

Elliott Hall 

Elvira Prondecki, B.A., Director 

Placement Director 

Josephine Parker Schaeffer, B.A. 

Business Affairs 

Business Manager 

Henry Lee Ferguson, Jr., B.S., C.P.A. 

Assistant Business Manager 
Everett Shuford Wilkinson 

Auditor 

George Minor Joyce, B.S., M.S. 

Buildings and Grounds 

Nestus Hannibal Gurley, B.S., Superintendent 

Residence Halls 

Mahlon Hedrick Adams, Director 

Dining Halls 

Helen Winslow Phillips, B.S.H.E., Director 

Developmental Affairs 

Development 

George Winston Hamer, B.A., Director 

Alumnae Secretary 

Barbara Ellen Parrish, B.A., M.A. 

News Bureau 

Albert Alexander Wilkinson, B.A., Director 



8 



PART I. 



The University 



I. THE UNIVERSITY 

HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro was established by 
legislative enactment on February 18, 1891, and opened on October 5, 
1892. The City of Greensboro, situated near the geographical center of 
the state, was selected for the location of the new institution. Its citi- 
zens voted bonds to the sum of $30,000 for the erection of the first 
buildings, and the original ten-acre site was given by R. S. Pullen and 
R. T. Gray, of Raleigh. 

The University, for many years (1896-1919) the State Normal and 
Industrial College, and later (1919-1932) the North Carolina College 
for Women, and from 1932-1963 the Woman's College of the University 
of North Carolina, came into being as a direct result of a crusade made 
by Charles Duncan Mclver in behalf of the education of women. Other 
pioneers in public-school education — notably, Charles B. Aycock, Edwin 
A. Alderman, and James Y. Joyner — came to Dr. Mclver's assistance; 
but to him more than any other individual the University owes its foun- 
dation. He became its first president and served it until his death in 
1906. In that year Dr. Julius I. Foust became president, and upon the 
foundation laid by Dr. Mclver he and his co-workers developed a strong 
liberal-arts college. 

During the years 1932-63 the University was known as the Woman's 
College of the University of North Carolina and as one of the three 
branches of the Consolidated University of North Carolina. In 1962 the 
Board of Trustees recommended that the Greensboro campus become co- 
educational in the fall of 1964. By act of the General Assembly in the 
spring of 1963 the name of the institution was changed to the University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

The crusader for founding the institution, Charles Duncan Mclver, 
served the institution as its first president. In 1906, following the death 
of Dr. Mclver, Dr. Julius I. Foust became president and served until 
1934, when he retired from active service. In 1934 Dr. Walter Clinton 
Jackson, who had served as teacher and vice-president, was elected 
head of the institution with the title of Dean of Administration. By act 
of the Board of Trustees in 1945, the title of the head of the institution 
was changed to Chancellor. 

Dr. Jackson, who retired in 1950, was succeeded by Dr. Edward 
Kidder Graham. After Dr. Graham's resignation in 1956, Dr. W. W. Pier- 
son, Jr., served as Acting Chancellor until July 1, 1957, when Dr. Gor- 
don W. Blackwell became Chancellor. Dr. W. W. Pierson returned to 
serve again as Acting Chancellor in September, 1960, after the resigna- 
tion of Dr. Blackwell. Dr. Otis A. Singletary became Chancellor on 
July 1, 1961. 

11 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Although the institution was founded upon a profound belief that 
education must go beyond providing technical skills and competencies, 
it has always been committed to a program strongly rooted in general 
education. In addition to education in the liberal arts, the University 
offers teacher education in all fields, and specialized curricula in art, 
music, home economics, business, physical education, and nursing educa- 
tion. 

From a student body of 223 and a faculty of 15 the University has 
grown to a student body of approximately 4,000 and a faculty of ap- 
proximately 250, and a plant valued at approximately $26,500,000. In 
addition, over 600 people are enrolled in extension centers throughout 
the state. 

The University is a member of the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools, The Association of American Colleges, the 
American Council of Education, the Southern Association of Colleges 
for Women, the North Carolina College Conference, and the National 
Commission of Accrediting. The University is listed with an approved 
program by the National Council of Accreditation in Teacher Education. 
The University is regionally accredited by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools. The School of Music is accredited by the National 
Association of Schools of Music. 

The University confers seven undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, Bache- 
lor of Science in Physical Education, Bachelor of Science in Business 
Education and Secretarial Administration, Bachelor of Science in Medi- 
cal Technology, and Bachelor of Fine Arts. Certain curricula of the 
Graduate School of the University are also offered at the University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro. These curricula are in the field of Biology, 
Business Education and Secretarial Administration, Education, English, 
History, Home Economics, Music, Physical Education, Psychology, and 
Fine Arts. A Ph.D. degree is given in Home Economics. 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro entered a new era 
as it became a co-educational University in the fall of 1964. It assumes 
a greater role as a part of the public-education system of the State of 
North Carolina. As a state institution it desires to be of the greatest 
possible service to the people of North Carolina, and its advantages are 
open to all on similar terms. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The main University campus is about one mile west of the central 
business district of Greensboro, and may be entered either from West 
Market Street or Spring Garden Street. It consists of one hundred thirty 
acres of developed and wooded land, including a nine-hole golf course. 

12 



The Library 

There are about fifty buildings valued at more than twenty-nine million 
dollars. These buildings are identified on the map appearing inside the 
back cover. More detailed descriptions of the residence halls, library, 
student union, infirmary and an off-campus recreation camp may be 
found elsewhere in this section. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Walter Clinton Jackson Library, completed in the spring of 
1950, has a capacity of over 300,000 volumes and total seating facilities 
for 1,000 students. It now has 221,072 cataloged volumes and a selected 
collection of federal and state documents, pamphlets, and maps. It pro- 
vides on open shelves a generous selection of reference books and bibli- 
ographies, periodicals, and reserve books for class assignments. In the 
general reading room there is a selection of classics and current litera- 
ture in all fields and a well-chosen collection of records. This area is 
attractively furnished to encourage leisurely reading and study. In the 
stack areas faculty studies and student carrells, desks, and tables are 
provided for concentrated work. 

A sound-proof seminar room, seating about 40, and a large lecture 
hall, seating 372, are provided for group use of documentary films, music 
or lectures. Microfilm readers and a microcard reader are provided for 
use of back files of newspapers and specialized reference books not 
otherwise available in print. 

It is a distinct advantage to the University at Greensboro that it is 
located in a rich literary and cultural area. In addition to its own book 
collection, the library is able in a short time, by means of inter-library 
loan service, to make quickly available for faculty and graduate research 
the extensive book resources of other units of the University, Duke 
University, and other libraries in the vicinity. 

The library is building collections to strengthen its position as a 
unit of the University and its facilities for graduate work. In the gradu- 
ate fields of home economics, education, music, art, and physical educa- 
tion, as well as in fields of the liberal arts, research facilities are being 
acquired. Files of periodicals and other serials, bibliographies, selected 
collections of documents in these fields, original editions, and out-of- 
print materials on micro-text are being acquired to support graduate 
programs. There are some special collections being developed: the 
Woman's Collection, the Homans' Collection in Physical Education (ac- 
quired from Wellesley College), Historical Textbooks, Juvenile Litera- 
ture, and the Dance. The library is the depository for the College 
Archives and the History of the College. 

A Friends of the Library organization was established in 1959. The 
officers for 1963-64 are: Mrs. Britt Armfield, Chairman; Mr. Zachary 

13 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Smith, First Vice-chairman; Mrs. Herbert Falk, Second Vice-chairman; 
Mr. Henry L. Ferguson, Treasurer; Mr. Charles M. Adams, Secretary. 
One of the main objectives of the Friends group is to help interpret 
the mission of the library and its needs to the people of North Carolina. 
Members of the organization also watch for opportunities to acquire 
for the library books which will add distinction and excellence to its 
collection. 

THE WEATHERSPOON ART GALLERY 

The Weatherspoon Art Gallery, named for Elizabeth Mclver Weather- 
spoon, is located in the north wing of Mclver Building. Facilities are 
provided for a program of exhibitions held throughout the year. This 
series of exhibits is an integral part of the instructional program of 
the Department of Art. The exhibitions are open to all students and 
thus become a part of the general education program for all students. 
The public is also invited to attend the exhibitions. Television programs 
originate in the Gallery, which bring to a large audience the exhibitions 
of paintings, prints, sculpture, and other objects. From time to time 
appropriate professional groups hold meetings in the Gallery. 

The Weatherspoon Gallery Association established in 1942, has given 
support in the formation of a permanent collection of paintings, sculp- 
ture, textiles, and prints by contemporary American and European 
artists and designers. Works by John Marin, Willem de Kooning, Wil- 
liam Ronald, John Flanagan, Alexander Calder, Robert Mallary, Henri 
Matisse, Pablo Picasso, and others are included in the Weatherspoon 
Gallery Collection. Membership in the Association is open to all persons 
who are interested in art. 

The annual student exhibition is held in May. This exhibition pro- 
vides a comprehensive display of the work done by the students in all 
courses given by the Department of Art. 

TELEVISION 

At the University is a Television Studio Building from which 
programs for WUNC-TV, The University's Educational Non-Commercial 
Channel 4 Television Station, are originated. This building contains a 
60'x60' studio, associated control room, projection room, film-editing 
room, and engineering room. There are also dressing rooms, scenery 
rooms, art studio, viewing room, and offices. The television equipment 
is ample for a full-time operating station. Although there is no cur- 
riculum in television, students in Drama use these facilities for labora- 
tory work. In addition, selected students are given an opportunity to 
participate in television activities, either as performers or as produc- 
tion and program assistants. In this way they are exposed to, and 

14 



The University Theatre 

trained in, the day-to-day operation of a full-time station. Programs 
telecast by WUNC-TV are in the nature of an extended service of the 
University. They are planned for and directed to all of the people in 
North Carolina. These are programs for specific groups (age, social, 
economic or educational level) and programs of general interest. Any 
activity of the University is potential television program material. The 
station also presents programs produced in co-operation with other edu- 
cational and public service agencies. 



THE UNIVERSITY THEATRE 

The Theatre is the producing organization of the Department of 
Drama and the Masqueraders, an honorary society of those students 
who have distinguished themselves by their work in theatre. It produces 
a series of plays and television programs. It frequently tours. Any stu- 
dent is welcome to participate. Four major productions are offered each 
year. Included among the recently produced plays are The Crucible, 
South Pacific and The Royal Gambit. 

Through its completely student produced Laboratory Theatre Pro- 
ductions one-act plays are presented in January. Any student on campus 
may request to do a drama project on this series. Recent plays have 
included A Sleep of Prisoners and This Property Is Condemned. 

In 1959 The Theatre was selected by the American Educational 
Theatre Association to tour under the joint sponsorship of A.E.T.A., 
U.S.O. and the Department of Defense for the entertainment of Ameri- 
can troops in the Pacific Command. On this tour performances were 
given in Japan, Korea, Hawaii and The Philippines. In 1962 the Theatre 
was once more chosen, this time to tour the Northeast Command of 
Iceland, Greenland, Newfoundland and Labrador. 

Two special brochures covering the Tours and Theatre Activities are 
available upon request from the Director of Admissions. 



LECTURES AND CONCERTS 

The College is wholly or partly responsible for bringing to the 
student body each year a number of distinguished artists and lecturers 
in the field of art, the dance, music, and letters. The College also co- 
operates with the Civic Music Association in bringing to the campus 
throughout the year persons distinguished in the field of music. 

In addition, the School of Music presents regular faculty and student 
recitals and concerts which all students may attend without charge. 



15 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Six musical organizations are open to college students who wish to 
continue their high school musical enjoyment. Included are the Uni- 
versity Choir, University Glee Club, University Chorale, University 
Orchestra, Chamber Music Players groups, and the University Band. 
Students are also urged to participate in School of Music opera produc- 
tions, either as soloists or in the choruses. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

There are twenty-three residence halls on the campus. In each hall is 
a counselor to whom students may go for advice and who supervises 
social activities in accordance with regulations of the University. The 
rooms are comfortably furnished. Only single beds are used. North 
Spencer Hall and South Spencer Hall (1904, remodeled and modernized 
in 1938) — named for Mrs. Cornelia Phillips Spencer, one of North 
Carolina's most distinguished women, three hundred sixteen students; 
Woman's Hall (1912) — dedicated by the General Assembly of North 
Carolina to the women of the Confederacy, fifty-six students; Kirkland 
Hall (1912) — named for Miss Sue May Kirkland, the first lady principal 
of the University, eighty -four students; Anna Howard Shaw Hall (1920) 
— named for the great woman suffragist, one hundred students; Gray 
Hall (1921) — named for Mr. Robert T. Gray, a member of the Board 
of Trustees of the University from 1900 to 1912, one hundred sixteen 
students; Bailey Hall (1922) — named for Mr. T. B. Bailey, a member of 
the Board of Trustees of the University from 1902 to 1916, one hundred 
sixteen students; Cotten Hall (1922) — named for Mrs. Sally Southall 
Cotten, one hundred sixteen students; Hinshaw Hall (1922) — named for 
Colonel G. W. Hinshaw, a member of the Board of Trustees of the Uni- 
versity from 1910 to 1918, one hundred sixteen students; Laura Coit Hall 
(1923) — named for Miss Laura Coit, late secretary of the University, 
one hundred sixteen students; Jamison Hall (1923) — named for Miss 
Minnie Jamison, one of the first students and long-time member of the 
faculty, one hundred sixteen students; Mary Foust Hall (1927) — named 
by the alumnae of the University in memory of the daughter of the late 
President Foust, one hundred forty students; Guilford Hall (1927) — a 
duplicate of Mary Foust Hall; Weil-Winfield Hall (1939)— named for 
Miss Martha Winfield, late professor of English at the University, and 
for Mrs. Mina Weil, benefactress of the University, two distinct but 
connected halls giving the appearance of one building, two hundred 
ninety students; Mendenhall-Ragsdale Hall (1950)— named for Miss 
Gertrude Mendenhall, charter member of the faculty and late head of the 
Department of Mathematics, and for Miss Virginia Ragsdale, who suc- 
ceeded Miss Mendenhall as head of the Department of Mathematics — 
similar in construction to Weil-Winfield, three hundred eight students; 

16 



Student Health Service 

Moore-Strong Hall (1960) — named for Miss Mary Taylor Moore, late 
registrar of the University, and for Miss Cornelia Strong, late professor 
of mathematics at the University — three hundred fifty students. Grogan- 
Reynolds — named for lone H. Grogan, alumna and long-time member 
of the faculty, and for Katharine Smith Reynolds, alumna to whose 
memory the Reynolds Scholarships are a memorial — four distinct but 
connected halls giving the appearance of one building, six hundred 
seventy-two students. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

The Student Health Service has as its aim the maintenance of good 
health among all members of the University community. To reach this 
objective, the work is necessarily of two types; first, preventive and 
second, therapeutic. 

Several types of preventive measures are taken. A complete medical 
examination given by the family physician is required of each new stu- 
dent before her acceptance and matriculation. This includes a complete 
physical examination, certain laboratory tests, a tuberculin test, and 
required immunizations. This examination done by the family physician 
is carefully reviewed by the University doctors before the student's 
admission. When requested by the family physician or when an exist- 
ing physical condition requires it, regular follow-up examinations are 
done by the medical staff. All seniors are offered a complete medical 
examination, by the medical staff, before graduation. 

If it is in the best interest of the student's health, he or she may 
be advised by the University physicians either to lighten the academic 
load or to withdraw from school until health is improved. Academic and 
administrative authorities readily agree to this recommendation from 
the University physicians. A careful check is made of all students en- 
gaged in extracurricular activities. The environmental conditions under 
which students live and work are carefully supervised. 

The care of students who are ill, which is the second major duty 
of the Health Service, is centered in the Anna M. Gove Infirmary. 
Here, with a staff of three full-time physicians, a part-time psychia- 
trist, six graduate nurses and a laboratory technician in attendance, all 
medical and minor surgical cases are given complete care. Major surgi- 
cal cases must be referred to a hospital or surgeon not directly con- 
nected with the University. A comprehensive insurance policy is offered 
to students, providing payment for medical services and hospitalization 
not available in the Student Health Service itself. Undergraduate 
students who live at home are entitled to the same outpatient care 
at the Infirmary as dormitory students but for bed care in the Infirmary 
they are charged a small, daily fee. 

17 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Students should report promptly to the Infirmary in cases of illness 
of any kind. Prompt attention to minor conditions prevents the develop- 
ment of major ill health. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The faculty and the students have integrated their ideas in the con- 
stitution governing the University. The law-making authority resides 
in a representative body from the student group and the faculty. All 
student officers are chosen democratically. The student organization 
works in close co-operation with the Dean of Students and the counselors 
who have charge of the residence halls. 

There are three divisions of the student government machinery: the 
Judicial System, the Legislature, and the House Organization, serving 
in their various capacities. It is understood that to the faculty and 
the executive officers is reserved the handling of such matters as affect 
academic questions, matters relating to the health of the University 
community, the control of property, and of special cases of discipline 
which are outside student jurisdiction. 

RELIGION 

Church Groups. Students are encouraged by both the University 
and the churches to attend the church of their choice and to identify 
themselves with an organized church group. Four denominations — 
Methodist, Episcopal, Baptist, and Presbyterian — maintain student sec- 
retaries who live near the University and work through student centers 
and churches adjacent to the campus. 

The Inter-Faith Council is composed of student representatives of 
the church groups. The Council promotes understanding of the common 
purposes of Jewish, Protestant, and Roman Catholic believers and unites 
all in joint activities. Members are working with the whole University 
on the fund for a chapel, a building in which students of all faiths will 
be at home. 

Director. The Dean of Students serves as Co-ordinator of Religious 
Activities. Her office is a clearinghouse for the activities of all campus 
religious organizations. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

The social life of the University centers around the residence hall 
units, and various clubs and class organizations. Picnics, week-end camp- 
ing trips, teas, and formal and informal dances help create a normal 
social atmosphere. Through certain of the clubs and through the advisory 

18 



Sports and Recreation 

system, members of the faculty are able to establish social contacts 
with the students. Altogether there are many opportunities within the 
campus community for a wholesome social life. 

Elliott Hall, the student union, is the center of extracurricular 
activities. Its facilities include a large ballroom, a game room, lounges, 
meeting rooms, offices for publications, study and locker rooms for day 
students, and the University book store and restaurant. 

SPORTS AND RECREATION 

The athletic fields include twelve tennis courts; soccer, speedball, 
hockey, lacrosse, and softball fields; a nine-hole golf course and practice 
tee and putting green; an archery range and other outdoor play areas. 
The Rosenthal Gymnasium houses the swimming pool, dressing and 
shower rooms, game room, one large gymnasium floor and two auxiliary 
areas. The Coleman Gymnasium provides the following modern facilities 
for a broad program of physical education for women; gymnasium, 
activity terrace, corrective unit, two dance studios, bowling alleys, 
indoor golf room, game rooms, and instructional and administrative 
rooms and offices. 

Piney Lake, the recreation center, is located about six miles south of 
Greensboro. Forty-two acres of beautiful wooded land provide facilities 
which include two well-equipped houses, a large lake, a recreation hall, 
a crafts and hobby shop, a log cabin, playing areas, and a new camp site 
complete with lodge, dining hall, and ten cabins. Students of the Uni- 
versity may use the recreation center for picnics, week-end outings, and 
for recreational purposes. The center is used also by the Department of 
Health, Physical Education and Recreation for instructional programs 
in camping and outdoor education, and by other departments and schools 
in the conduct of instructional work in out-of-doors laboratories. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

The Board of Trustees prohibits any secret organizations. 

Phi Beta Kappa. Epsilon Chapter of North Carolina, Phi Beta 
Kappa. Candidates for the B.A. degree who have high scholastic aver- 
ages are eligible for election to Phi Beta Kappa. Ordinarily students 
are elected in the senior year, but juniors of exceptionally high scholas- 
tic standing are also elected. Alumnae of not less than ten years' 
standing who have distinguished themselves in the arts, literature, or 
the sciences are eligible for election to alumnae membership. 

Pi Kappa Lambda. Tau Chapter of Pi Kappa Lambda, the only 
national honorary scholastic society recognizing superior students of 
music. Elections are from the senior class. 

19 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Mu Phi Epsilon, national professional music society. 

Sigma Delta Pi. Alpha Tau Chapter of Sigma Delta Pi, the national 
Spanish fraternity. 

Omicron Nu, national home economics honor society. 

Tau Psi Omega, national French fraternity. 

Sigma Alpha, national business education honor society. 

Alpha Kappa Delta, national sociology honor fraternity. 

Phi Alpha Theta, national history honor fraternity. 

Psi Chi, national psychology honor society. 

Beta Beta Beta, national honor society for students in the biologi- 
cal sciences. 

National Society of Interior Designers. 

Alpha Psi Omega, national honor society for students in drama. 

Golden Chain, campus honorary society. Membership in Golden 
Chain is based on a consideration of the following qualities: leadership, 
scholarship, service, tolerance, magnanimity, judgment, and character. 

Sigma Alpha, business education honor society. 

Clubs. The numerous departmental clubs and other organizations 
promote interest in a wide range of activities. 

The Recreation Association sponsors the following activities: 
swimming, gymnastics, modern dance, hockey, softball, basketball, 
archery, volleyball, soccer, tennis, riding, golf, boating, and speedball. 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 

The Placement Office aids graduates in solving the problem of post- 
college employment. It serves as an intermediary between students and 
prospective employers. It acquaints students with possibilities in the 
teaching, business, and professional fields; it assembles comprehensive 
records on each registrant and makes these records available to ap- 
propriate representatives; and it arranges interviews with prospective 
employers. The data assembled for individual records include academic 
achievement, training, experience, extracurricular activities, and honors. 
Confidential letters of recommendation are incorporated in the file of 
each registrant. The Office initiates contacts for students or cooperates 
with students who make contacts through personal efforts or through 
various departments of the College. It aids the registrant in directing 
her search to a field appropriate to her aptitude, training, and interest. 

The Office receives more calls for qualified personnel than it can 
supply from its registrants. It is to the mutual advantage of the stu- 

20 



Publications 

dents and the Office that a complete record of registrants be assembled 
by the fall of the senior year. 



PUBLICATIONS 

Alumnae News: Published quarterly. The official organ of the Alum- 
nae Association. 

The Carolinian: The University newspaper, issued weekly. 

The Coraddi: The literary magazine of the University, issued 
quarterly. 

Pine Needles : The University annual. 

UNC-G News: The University newsletter, published four times dur- 
ing the school year. 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Alumnae Association of the University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro was organized in 1893 and incorporated by act of the Gen- 
eral Assembly of North Carolina on March 8, 1909. The objects of the 
Association, as set forth in Section 3 of the Act incorporating it, are: 
"To encourage, foster, and promote education in the State of North 
Carolina; to aid and assist the University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro by donations or otherwise; to aid and assist, by loans or donations, 
or both, worthy young women of the state to obtain an education at the 
said University, and for such purposes to receive, hold, invest, manage, 
and disburse any fund or funds which may come into its possession." 
The official publication of the Alumnae Association is The Alumnae 
News, sent to active members of the Alumnae Association four times 
each year. In addition to keeping records on and attempting to maintain 
contact with twenty-eight thousand former students, the Alumnae office 
assists in the promotion and organization of local alumnae chapters 
throughout North Carolina and in many cities outside the state. Alum- 
nae House, opened in January, 1937, is headquarters for alumnae work 
in general. The House is available for official alumnae, student, and col- 
lege affairs — social, cultural, and educational. 

Officers for 1964-1965 are: President, Mrs. William S. Joyner, Chapel 
Hill; First Vice-President, Mrs. John D. Watson, Greensboro; Second 
Vice-President, Mrs. Bobby F. Johnson, Burlington; Recording Secre- 
tary, Mrs. G. Edward Miller, Asheboro; Executive Secretary, Miss 
Barbara Parrish, Greensboro. 

21 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

THE HOME ECONOMICS FOUNDATION 

The Home Economics Foundation was incorporated in July, 1946, 
with headquarters at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 
North Carolina. The corporation is a charitable, nonprofit, and educa- 
tional organization, having no capital stock. Its members shall include 
such individuals, firms, and corporations as shall meet the terms and 
conditions for membership as are prescribed from time to time by the 
by-laws of the corporation. The management of the corporation and 
its properties shall be vested in a Board of Directors, which shall have 
full power and authority to act. 

The purposes of the Home Economics Foundation are: (1) To aid 
and promote through financial assistance and other means all types of 
education, both undergraduate and graduate, and research in home 
economics in order that the School of Home Economics at the University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro may serve the people, the homes, the 
institutions, and the industries of North Carolina with maximum values 
at minimum costs in money, time, and labor. This contribution will in- 
clude foods and nutrition, clothing and textiles, housing and furnishings, 
child development and family relationships, interior design and home 
management, home economics education, and institution management. 
(2) To enable the School of Home Economics to develop a strong teach- 
ing and research program through helping to secure and keep an out- 
standing and highly trained faculty. (3) To enable the School of Home 
Economics to offer short service courses, forums, and conferences on 
various subjects of home economics. (4) To enable the School of Home 
Economics to publish and distribute bulletins and reports of research and 
studies on various subjects of home economics. (5) To enable the School 
of Home Economics to sponsor various projects for improving the home, 
industrial, and institutional life of this state. 

All funds contributed to the Foundation will be used for the pur- 
chase of special and additional equipment and teaching materials, for 
the supplementing of salaries of professors, instructors, and research 
fellows, and for the publication and distribution of papers, bulletins, 
and books, all in the interest of the development and service of the 
School of Home Economics in the University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro to the people, homes, and industries of North Carolina and 
the South. All funds solicited and collected for the Foundation will be 
applied as the donor requests in so far as is consistent with the program 
adopted. 

The officers of the Foundation are: President, Mrs. R. S. Ferguson, 
Taylorsville; Vice-Presidents, Henry A. Foscue, High Point; Mrs. Rosa 
B. Parker, Albemarle; Secretary, Mr. James Lowe, Charlotte; Treasurer, 
Mr. Henry Ferguson, Jr., Greensboro. 

22 



Child and Family Development 

Further information regarding the Home Economics Foundation 
may be secured by writing to Dean Naomi G. Albanese, School of Home 
Economics, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 



THE INSTITUTE FOR CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT 

Established September, 1959, by action of the Trustees of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina and financed initially by a grant from the Home 
Economics Foundation of the University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro, the Institute for Child and Family Development is an interdis- 
ciplinary agency which has two primary purposes: Research — to stimu- 
late and co-ordinate research in child development and family life, and 
to transmit the findings to interested professional and lay groups. Ex- 
tended Service — to provide consultation, instruction, and facilities for 
groups in the regions which are concerned with child development and 
family life. This service will draw heavily on the accumulated pool of 
research and technical knowledge developed through the research func- 
tion of the Institute. 



DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 

The Office of Developmental Affairs was set up in June 1962. Its 
purpose is to seek the advancement of understanding and support of the 
College. This includes interpreting the College to its constituent groups, 
involving them in affairs of the College and soliciting and encouraging 
financial support from them for the College. George W. Hamer, Greens- 
boro, N. C, is director. 

The College maintains a news bureau for the purpose of publicizing 
college events and for providing information to people of the state 
regarding the activities of the campus and the members of the student 
body. Albert A. Wilkinson is in charge of the News Bureau. 



23 



PART II. 



Expenses 









\ f ^ list 










IB 



IS 



911 









J ' 



% 



ran 



W0§m6 







, ■. 






II. EXPENSES 

RESIDENCE STATUS FOR TUITION PAYMENT 

The tuition charge for legal residents of North Carolina is less than 
for nonresidents. A legal resident of North Carolina is one who has his 
domicile in this State. It is important that each applicant for admission 
and each enrolled student know his residence status for tuition payment 
and understand the regulations governing residence status. The following 
regulations cover most factual situations : 

1. A person twenty-one years of age or older is not deemed eligible 
for the lower tuition rate unless he has maintained his legal residence 
in North Carolina for at least six months next preceding the date of 
his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in this State. 

2. The legal residence of a person under twenty-one years of age at 
the time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in 
this State is that of his parents, surviving parent, or legal guardian. 
In cases where parents are divorced or legally separated, the legal 
residence of the father will control unless custody of the minor has been 
awarded by court order to the mother or to a legal guardian other than 
a parent. No claim of residence in North Carolina based upon residence 
of a guardian in North Carolina will be considered if either parent is 
still living unless the action of the court appointing the guardian 
antedates the student's first enrollment in a North Carolina institution 
of higher education by at least twelve months. 

3. The residence status of any student is determined as of the time 
of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in North 
Carolina and may not thereafter be changed except: (a) in the case of 
a nonresident minor student at the time of his first enrollment whose 
parents have subsequently established legal residence in North Carolina; 
and (b) in the case of a resident who abandons his legal residence in 
North Carolina. In either case, the appropriate tuition rate will become 
effective at the beginning of the semester or term next following the 
date of change of residence status. 

4. The legal residence of a wife follows that of her husband, except 
that a woman student currently enrolled in this institution as a resident 
may continue as a resident even though she marry a nonresident. 

5. Military personnel attached to military posts or reservations in 
North Carolina are not considered eligible for the lower tuition rate 
unless they have maintained a legal residence in the state for at least 
the six months next preceding the date of first enrollment in an 
institution of higher education in the state. 



27 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

6. Aliens lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent 
residence who have established a legal residence in North Carolina ac- 
cording to Paragraphs number 1, 2, or 4, above, are eligible for the 
lower tuition rate. 

7. Ownership of property in or payment of taxes to the State of 
North Carolina apart from legal residence will not qualify one for the 
lower tuition rate. 

8. Discretion to adjust individual cases within the spirit of these 
regulations is lodged in the Business Officer and Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity. 

Any student or prespective student in doubt concerning his residence 
status must bear the responsibility for securing a ruling by stating his 
case in writing to the Business Manager. 

TUITION AND REGULAR FEES — 
FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATES 

The University reserves the right to make changes in charges for 
tuition and fees without advanced notice. It is anticipated that the 
charges for 1964-65 will be as follows: 

For Students Living on Campus: 

In-State Out-of-State 

Tuition $175.00 $ 600.00 

Academic fees 81.00 81.00 

Health service 20.00 20.00 

Student Activities: 

Campus organizations 14.50 14.50 

Entertainment 9.50 9.50 

Student Union 20.00 20.00 

Recreation Center 10.00 10.00 

Swimming pool 4.00 4.00 

Room 240.00 240.00 

Board 325.00 325.00 

Laundry 40.00 40.00 



Total $939.00 $1,364.00 

For Students not Living on Campus: 

Deduct Room, Board, Laundry 605.00 605.00 



Total $334.00 $ 759.00 

28 



Expenses 

ROOM RESERVATION DEPOSIT 

A dormitory room deposit of $50.00 is required of all students who 
will live in a University residence hall, and must be paid before a room 
assignment is made. 

For continuing students, this deposit must be paid to the University 
Cashier prior to pre-registration and is a prerequisite to pre-registra- 
tion. Students admitted through the Admissions Office (either new or 
former) shall send the deposit to the Director of Admissions. 

This deposit is credited to the first payment of required room rent. 
It is non-refundable unless the University finds that the student is 
ineligible to register for classes. 



SCHEDULE OF PAYMENTS 

The annual charges as listed above are payable in equal sums each 
semester, in two installments per semester, in amounts and on or before 
dates as follows : 

For Students Living on Campus: 

First Semester: 

In-State Out-of-State 

Room Reservation Fee $ 50.00 $ 50.00 

( Non-Refundable ) 

On Entrance 184.75 291.00 

November 16 234.75 341.00 

Second Semester: 

January 15 234.75 341.00 

March 15 234.75 341.00 

For Students not Living on Campus: 

First Semester: 

On Entrance $ 83.50 $ 189.75 

November 16 83.50 189.75 

Second Semester: 

January 15 83.50 189.75 

March 15 83.50 189.75 

Certain advance deposits (application fee, room reservation, etc.) 
have been required of students. If any of these were announced as 
creditable, the amount of the student's first payment under the schedule 
as listed above should be reduced in the amount of such deposits. 



29 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

TUITION AND FEES 

Special, Unclassified, and Part-time Students 
Undergraduates 

A. Incidental Special, Unclassified, and Part-Time Students. These 
students are defined as follows: 

1. Study represents an activity secondary to a full-time occupation. 

2. Residence is off campus (unless by special advance arrangements). 

3. Six or fewer semester hours are scheduled. 

Such students will pay $9 per credit hour of instruction ($32 for 
out-of-state students), plus an academic fee of $5 per semester 
regardless of the number of hours scheduled. Incidental students 
are exempt from the activities fee. 

B. Regular Special and Unclassified Students and Part-time Degree 
Candidates. 

These students are defined as follows : 

1. Those for whom study is the primary activity. 

2. More than six semester hours are scheduled. 



Credit 


Academic Activities 








Hours 


Fees Fees* Tuition 


Total 


Fees 






Out-of- 




Out-of- 




In-State 


state 


In-State 


State 


7 


$28.00 $15.00 $63.00 


$224.00 


$106.00 


$267.00 


8 


32.00 15.00 72.00 


256.00 


119.00 


303.00 


9 


36.00 15.00 81.00 


288.00 


132.00 


339.00 


Over 9 


Same as for full-time undergraduates 








SPECIAL 


FEES 







Late Registration: All students who register for classes after the 
regularly scheduled dates have passed will be charged a late registration 
fee of $5. This fee is payable upon completion of registration. 

Audits: Auditing a course includes the privilege of being present in 
the classroom, but not participating in class discussion or laboratory or 
studio work. An undergraduate student paying full tuition and fees may 
audit one course per semester without additional fee. An undergraduate 
student paying part tuition and fees may not audit more than two 
courses per semester, paying same tuition charges as credit courses. 
These fees are payable in full at the time such courses are scheduled. 



♦This fee includes the use of the Student Union and the Recreation Center. It does 
not include the student activities fee for campus organizations nor the lecture- 
entertainment series. A fee of $4.75 per semester entitles either a regular or incidental 
student to admission to events in the lecture-entertainment series. 



30 



Expenses 

Practice Teaching: A fee of $10 for a three-hour course, or $20 for 
a six-hour course, is charged during the semester in which the course is 
scheduled. These fees are payable in full at the time such courses are 
scheduled. 

Applied Music (Individual Instruction) : Music majors receiving 
individual instruction in any department of applied music will pay, in 
addition to regular tuition and fees, $30 per semester for the first course 
scheduled and $15 per semester for each additional course, if required. 
Other students will pay, in addition to regular tuition and fees, $30 per 
semester for each course. All fees are payable at the time of regis- 
tration. 

Applied Music (Group Instruction) : Should the special instruction 
be given in classes rather than by private lessons the fees are one-half 
those shown above except for the registration fee which, if required, 
remains at $10 per semester. 

Music Practice Fees and Instrument Rentals: Special fees are 
charged for use of practice rooms and/or instruments. A schedule of 
such fees may be secured from the School of Music. The appropriate 
charge for each student is determined by the School of Music and is 
payable upon receipt by the student of a statement from the Cashier. 

Laboratory Breakage: The standard academic fees charged all stu- 
dents include the use of laboratory facilities. Students are required, 
however, to pay for any equipment broken or lost. The amount due is 
determined by the several departments after periodic inspections and 
inventories, and is payable upon receipt of a statement from the Cashier. 

X-rays: While the Health Service fee covers ordinary medical 
services in the University Infirmary, extra charges are made for X-ray 
services. Such fees are determined by the University Physician and are 
payable upon receipt of a statement from the Cashier. 

Graduation Fee: For degree candidates, a fee of $10.00 covering 
rental of cap and gown and cost of diploma, is payable during the 
semester in which the requirements for a degree are to be completed. 
No reduction of the fee is allowed for those receiving degrees in absentia. 
A similar fee of $7.50 is required of students completing the course in 
Nursing Education and $6.25 for Commercial students. 

OTHER EXPENSES 

The foregoing statements cover essentially all of the charges to be 
paid to the University Cashier. In order that students and parents may 
develop reasonable accurate budgets, a few other expenses are listed. 

31 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Books and Supplies: These are to be paid for as purchased, either 
from the University Book Store or other available suppliers. The cost 
varies in accordance with the courses of study, but generally runs 
$50-$100 per year. 

Dormitory Furnishings: Students furnish their own pillows, pillow 
cases, sheets, blankets, bedspreads and towels; and room accessories, 
such as study lamps, draperies, scatter rugs, wastebaskets, etc. 

Uniforms: All students are required to purchase an approved gym- 
nasium outfit costing approximately $21. Students in Nursing Education, 
during their freshman year, must purchase uniforms and accessories 
at a cost of approximately $50. Many laboratory courses require special 
aprons. Smocks or coveralls are often required in art classes. A number 
of self-help jobs require special uniforms. Unless the student has 
advance information as to exactly what is required, it is preferable 
to purchase these items after arrival. 

Dry Cleaning: The University Laundry handles wash goods only, 
the cost of such services being included in the laundry fee. Woolens and 
other articles requiring dry cleaning must be sent out to local establish- 
ments. 

TUITION AND REGULAR FEES— GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Graduate students will recognize that many of the listed expenses 
will apply to them as well as to undergraduates. There is, however, a 
different method of calculation of standard tuition and fees. Details 
are carried in The Graduate School section of the catalogue. 

REFUNDS 

Refunds are not made after the first four weeks except for medical 
reasons certified by the University Physician. The Accounting Depart- 
ment shall prorate all refunds. 



32 



PART III. 



Financial Aid 




mmmm 



III. FINANCIAL AID 

The University makes every effort within the bounds of its available 
resources to encourage and assist young people of ability and seriousness 
of purpose to secure a college education. Lack of adequate funds to 
meet the necessary expenses should not bar a good student who desires 
to attend college from realizing that desire. If she is willing to work, 
and seeks financial help, the University will aid her insofar as is 
possible and feasible. 

Students needing assistance in meeting their expenses while attend- 
ing the University should discuss the matter with the Student Aid 
Officer. Resources available include fellowships, scholarships, awards, 
loans, and opportunities for part-time employment. The Student Aid 
Office is located in the Administration Building. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

The following are arranged alphabetically by the key word in the 
name of the fellowship or scholarship. 

The Alamance-Caswell Medical Auxiliary Scholarship. This 
scholarship was established by the Alamance-Caswell Medical Auxiliary 
to aid students in health careers. Preference is given to qualified 
students from Alamance and Caswell counties. 

Alumnae Scholarships. The Alumnae Association of the University 
through its Alumnae Annual Giving Program has established four 
scholarships valued at $500 each for incoming Freshman. These scholar- 
ships will be awarded for one year only with the understanding that 
they will be renewed subject to the scholar's performance and conduct 
being satisfactory to the Alumnae Scholars Committee. Alumnae Scholars 
will be selected by the Alumnae Scholars Committee on the basis of 
academic standing, intellectual promise, character, leadership ability, 
financial need and demonstrated ambition. Inquiries should be addressed 
to the Alumnae Office, University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

American Business Women's Association Scholarship Fund. The 
Greensboro Chapters of the American Business Women's Association — 
Greensboro Charter Chapter, Lou-Celia Chapter, Cardinal Chapter and 
Old North State Chapter— established the ABWA Scholarship Fund on 
March 14, 1963. The earnings from this fund will be used to provide 
scholarships for deserving women desiring to better themselves through 
education. The amount of the scholarship awards and the selection of 
the recipients will be determined by the Scholarship Committee of the 
University working with the educational chairmen of the chapters in- 
volved. Inquiries concerning the ABWA Scholarship Fund should be 
addressed to the Student Aid Officer, University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro. 

35 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Angels of the Theatre of the University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro. Four awards of $250 each are made annually by the De- 
partment of Drama-Speech to outstanding upperclassmen drama-speech 
majors who serve as undergraduate assistants to the directors of the 
Theatre in the areas of business management, scenery, lighting, costum- 
ing. The Angels of the Theatre of the University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro are a group of faculty members and citizens who are 
interested in furthering the cultural life of the University and com- 
munity by supporting the program of the Theatre. 

The Winfield S. Barney Award. In 1956 the colleagues, friends, 
and former students of Dr. W. S. Barney, chairman of the Department 
of Romance Languages, established this fund in his memory. The income 
from it is used for an award to the senior student of Romance Lan- 
guages who has the highest academic average. 

The Borden Home Economics Scholarship Award. The Borden 
Company Foundation, Incorporated, New York City, established at the 
University an annual scholarship award in the amount of $300. All 
senior students majoring in home economics who have included in their 
curricula two or more courses in food and nutrition shall be eligible for 
the award. A student will be selected from those eligible on the basis 
of highest scholastic achievement prior to the senior year. 

The Aubrey Lee Brooks Scholarships. An endowment fund of 
approximately $1,000,000 was established in 1955 by Mr. Aubrey Lee 
Brooks of Greensboro to promote the education of deserving youth by 
providing scholarships at the University of North Carolina in Chapel 
Hill, the North Carolina State of the University of North Carolina at 
Raleigh, and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, to high 
school graduates selected by the Trustees of the Aubrey Lee Brooks 
Foundation. Applicants for these scholarships shall be residents of 
Surry, Stokes, Rockingham, Caswell, Person, Granville, Alamance, 
Orange, Durham, Guilford, and Forsyth counties. Applications may be 
secured from high school principals in the counties named. The scholar- 
ships are currently valued at approximately $600 for each year. 

The Hennie Bynum Fund. The late Judge John Gray Bynum be- 
queathed to the University $1,000, the income from which is used to aid 
young women from the Presbyterian Church of Morganton, North 
Carolina. - 

The Mary Channing Coleman Memorial Fund. This fund is estab- 
lished by the staff and the graduates of the Department of Physical 
Education in memory of Miss Mary Channing Coleman, who was head 
of the department from 1920 until her death in 1947. The fund offers a 
scholarship for graduate work in health, physical education, and rec- 
reation. The scholarship is awarded to a senior candidate for the degree 

36 



Financial Aid 

of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. If there is no member 
of the graduating class who meets the conditions of the scholarship 
committee, the committee shall have the right to award the scholarship 
to a student who has completed her undergraduate professional educa- 
tion at the University within the preceding five years. 

University Stores. Profits derived from the operation of campus 
stores and merchandising activities are devoted to grants-in-aid to 
students selected on the basis of character, citizenship, and complete 
compliance with all requirements of the University pertaining to ad- 
mission and normal academic progress. 

Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital Scholarship-Loan Fund. The 
Trustees of the Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital have established a 
$20,000 revolving scholarship-loan fund to provide for scholarship-loan 
awards up to $400 annually based upon need to students enrolled in the 
two-year Associate Degree Program in Nursing. 

The full amount of each $400 scholarship-loan will be cancelled for 
each year of service as a full-time nurse in Moses H. Cone Hospital 
after the student has graduated from the Associate Degree Program in 
Nursing. During this period the nurse will receive full nursing salary. 

Students receiving the Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital Scholar- 
ship-Loan have the option of repaying the loan at 3% interest. 

Inquiries should be addressed to the Student Aid Officer, University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

The Danforth Summer Fellowships. The Danforth Foundation of 
St. Louis, Missouri, has established two annual fellowships at the 
University for home economics majors. Each fellowship covers the 
expenses of the respective award. The recipients of these fellowships 
are selected by the home economics faculty. One fellowship is to an 
outstanding junior in home economics for four weeks of study, travel, 
and recreation in July and August, two weeks in St. Louis and two weeks 
at Camp Miniwanca of the American Youth Foundation on Lake 
Michigan. The other fellowship is to an outstanding freshman in home 
economics for two weeks of study and recreation in August at Camp 
Miniwanca. 

The Harriet Elliott Social Science Forum Fund. This fund has 
been set up as a memorial to Dean Harriet Elliott, who was for many 
years a professor of political science at the University and Dean of 
Women for twelve years. The income from the fund will be used for 
the support of the annual Social Science Forum and for the establish- 
ment of scholarships or fellowships in political science. 

37 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Escheats Fund. A number of scholarships valued at $175 or more 
are given each year to students who are residents of North Carolina, 
through the Escheats Fund of the Consolidated University of North 
Carolina. 

The Faculty Scholarship. This award, supported by contributions 
from members of the faculty, is given annually to a junior or senior 
on the basis of scholarship, citizenship, and need. 

The Louise and Herbert Falk Scholarship. This scholarship was 
established in 1960 by Mr. and Mrs. Falk. It provides an annual award 
of $250 to a worthy and needy student. 

The Henry A. Fosque Interior Design Scholarship. Established 
by Henry A. Foscue of High Point, this $300 scholarship is awarded 
annually to an undergraduate in the interior design program of the 
School of Home Economics. 

Jusius I. Foust Scholarship. Supported by an endowment estab- 
lished by Dr. and Mrs. Foust, the scholarship is awarded annually to a 
rising senior who plans to teach. 

The Mary Harrington Harrell Scholarship. Each Commercial 
Class leaves a fund to be awarded at the beginning of the second semes- 
ter to a student in this department who is doing creditable work and 
who needs financial assistance. 

The Leonard B. Hurley Memorial Scholarship. This memorial 
fund was established by friends of Dr. Leonard N. Hurley, who for 
thirty-nine years was a member of the University faculty, and for sixteen 
of those years was head of the Department of English. The income from 
the fund will be awarded annually to a senior majoring in English. 

Home Economics Staff Scholarship. This award, supported by 
contributions from members of the staff of the School of Home Eco- 
nomics, is given annually to an undergraduate on the basis of scholar- 
ship and need. 

The Inter-Class Council Scholarship. The four classes contribute 
equally to a $500 scholarship, which is awarded annually to an incoming 
freshman chosen by the Scholarship Committee on the basis of merit and 
need. 

The Dr. Elisabeth Jastrow Scholarship. Friends of Dr. Elisabeth 
Jastrow, Professor Emeritus of art history, have established this scholar- 
ship in her honor for a worthy junior (not necessarily an art major, but 
one who is enrolled in a course in art history, or who has been enrolled 
in a course in art history.) Application for the scholarship may be 
made directly by the interested student. Faculty members have the 

38 



Financial Aid 

privilege of making recommendations. Applications for the scholar- 
ship should be filed with the head of the Art Department by April 1 
prior to its use in the fall. 

The Jefferson Standard Scholarships. (Established by the Jeffer- 
son Standard Life Insurance Company in 1961.) A grant of $3,000 
annually supports a maximum of four Jefferson Standard Scholars, 
chosen on the basis of character, scholarship, leadership, and financial 
need. An award of $750 will be made each year to an incoming fresh- 
man woman. The scholarship is renewable subject to satisfactory 
performance by the scholar. The deadline for applications is February 
15. 

Betty Brown Jester. Alumnae and friends of Betty Brown Jester, 
former alumnae secretary, have established a fund in her honor. The 
income is given annually to a needy student. 

Mary Fields Jones Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship, estab- 
lished by the alumnae of Cumberland County, is given annually to a 
student from Cumberland County. 

The Roxie Armfield King Scholarships. The Roxie Armfield King 
Scholarships are made possible through the generosity of the late Mrs. 
Roxie Armfield King, a long-time resident of Guilford County. Mrs. King 
bequeathed to the University of North Carolina at Greensboro a sub- 
stantial sum, the income from which is used for the purpose of giving 
encouragement and financial assistance to worthy students who are 
residents of North Carolina. 

Kroger Scholarship. The Kroger Company provides one $250 
scholarship for a freshman in home economics. Awards are made on 
the basis of scholastic achievements in high school as well as leader- 
ship qualities demonstrated in school, church, and youth organizations. 
Need for financial aid may also be considered. 

The Spencer Love Scholarships in Fine Arts. The Martha and 
Spencer Love Foundation established the Spencer Love Scholarships in 
Fine Arts which will be awarded to four incoming Freshmen each year. 
The scholarships are valued at $500 and will be renewable provided 
the scholastic record and conduct of the scholar are satisfactory to the 
Spencer Love Scholarship Committee. Requests for information con- 
cerning these scholarships should be addressed to the Student Aid 
Officer, University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

The Mrs. Charles D. McIver Memorial Scholarship Fund. This 
fund was established from a legacy of the late Dr. Anna M. Gove. The 
income from the $5,000 gift is awarded "every other year as a scholar- 
ship to some capable, well-trained and upright junior or senior who is 
planning to study for and secure the degree of Doctor of Medicine." 

39 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

The Mendenhall Scholarship Fund. Miss Gertrude Whittier 
Mendenhall, head of the Department of Mathematics from the founding 
of the University until her death in 1926, left a fund of $2,091.41 to 
endow a scholarship to be named in honor of her aunt, Judith J. 
Mendenhall. The will provides that a faculty committee award the 
scholarship annually to a deserving student "who has made good re- 
cords in preparatory and freshman mathematics and who desires to do 
higher work in mathematics and allied sciences." 

The James G. K. McClure Educational and Development Fund, 
Inc. This fund provides a limited number of scholarships to qualified 
freshmen from Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, 
Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Madi- 
son, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania, Wa- 
tauga, Yancey counties. 

The value of each scholarship is $300. The awards are based on the 
"high school record for both scholarship and leadership, evidence of 
Christian character, intellectual promise, demonstrated ambition, and 
financial need." 

The Grace Van Dyke More Memorial Scholarship. Miss Grace 
Van Dyke More, a member of the faculty of the School of Music for 
twenty-two years, bequeathed to the University an endowment of $3,000 
which has been supplemented by a gift of $600 from Edna Williams 
Curl, '33, and Nita Williams Dunn, '28. The income is awarded annually 
to a student in music education. 

The Hattie DeBerry Meisenheimer Scholarship Fund. The in- 
come from a trust created under the will of the late C. A. Meisenheimer 
is used for scholarships honoring the memory of Mrs. Meisenheimer, an 
alumna of the University at Greensboro. 

Music Scholarships. A number of scholarships are available to 
majors in the School of Music who are outstanding performing musi- 
cians. Awards are made upon the recommendation of the Dean of the 
School of Music. 

Dorothy van Deusen Opdyke. This scholarship is granted by the 
Southern Baptist Convention for the benefit of needy students from the 
mountains. 

Palmyra Pharr Scholarship Fund. Dr. Fred W. Morrison, a for- 
mer member of the University faculty, established this fund in 1942 in 
honor of his mother, Palmyra Pharr Morrison, and has made subsequent 
additions to the fund. The value of the fund is $64,404. Preference is 
given to residents of Rowan and Cabarrus counties. 

40 



Financial Aid 

Phi Beta Kappa Scholarship. Epsilon Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa 

in North Carolina makes every fall a scholarship of $100 to that junior 
who in her first two years at the University at Greensboro has made the 
highest average in her class. 

Charles W. Phillips Scholarship Fund. This fund was established 
by the Class of 1962 in honor of Charles W. Phillips who retired on 
July 1, 1962 after serving the University for twenty-seven years. At the 
time of retirement he was Director of Public Relations and Extension. 
The income from the fund will be awarded annually to a deserving stu- 
dent in need of financial assistance. 

Helen Lee Pickard Memorial Fund. This memorial scholarship has 
been established by friends of Helen Lee Pickard, who for many years 
was assistant to the business manager at the University. The income 
from the fund is given annually to a needy student. 

Pixie Playhouse Award in Drama. Each year an award of $250 is 
made to an outstanding upperclassman drama-speech major who is 
especially interested in children's theatre. The Pixie Playhouse makes 
the award upon recommendation of the Department of Drama-Speech. 
The Pixie Playhouse is composed of the University Theatre, the Greens- 
boro Junior League, and the Greensboro City and Guilford county 
school systems, and produces a series of plays for children each year. 
The assistantship is in business management. 

Eunice Kirkpatrick Rankin Scholarship. This memorial scholar- 
ship has been established by the alumnae of the Atlanta chapter. 

Myrtle Spaugh Reeves Scholarship Fund. Mrs. Elizabeth Reeves 
Lyon, Class of 1938, has established the Myrtle Spaugh Reeves Scholar- 
ship Fund in honor of her mother. The income is used to support a 
scholarship awarded annually to a student registered or registering 
as an art major. 

The Katharine Smith Reynolds Scholarships. These scholarships 
were established by the Zachary Smith Reynolds Foundation on No- 
vember 16, 1962, as a memorial to Mrs. Katharine Smith Reynolds. 
Scholarships will be awarded each year to twelve incoming freshman 
women from North Carolina who have been nominated by their high 
schools. The selection will be based on scholarship ability, character, 
leadership, and need. The scholarships are valued at $1,200 a year and 
are renewable subject to satisfactory performance by the scholars. The 
deadline for nominations is January 20. 

Scholarship in Science. The Faculty Science Club offers a scholar- 
ship to a rising junior, a rising senior, or a graduating senior majoring 
in any department represented in the Science Club. The award is made 

41 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

on the basis of scholarship, personality, and financial need. The fund 
for the award consists of a percentage of the dues of members of the 
Science Club, contributions which the various student organizations in 
science may make, and of gifts from members of the Science Club and 
from others interested in science. 

Sears-Roebuck Foundation Scholarships. Scholarships of $200 
are given each year to three graduates of North Carolina high schools 
who wish to enter the School of Home Economics. Funds for the 
scholarships are provided by the Sears-Roebuck Foundation. Preference 
is given to students from rural areas, and awards are made on the 
basis of need, scholastic record in high school, participation in 4-H 
club projects and other community activities. 

The Anna Howard Shaw Scholarship Fund. The late Miss Lucy 
B. Anthony of Moylan, Pennsylvania, established this fund to keep alive 
the memory of Dr. Anna Howard Shaw. The scholarship is awarded 
annually to an outstanding student in the field of social science. 

Mary Eliza Spicer Scholarship. This award of $200 is given 
annually to a freshman with interest in the Romance Languages. The 
recipient is chosen from selected students by a competitive examination 
which must be taken at the University during the preceding spring 
semester. This fund was established by Pierce T. Angell and daughter, 
Susan Spicer Angell, in memory of Mary Eliza Spicer Angell, Class 
of 1929. 

The Susan Stout Scholarship. Established by her family, her 
classmates, and friends, the scholarship is a memorial to Susan Stout, 
Class of 1958. The award is made annually to the rising senior major 
in Physical Education with the highest academic average for six 
semesters. 

Cornelia Strong Memorial. Miss Cornelia Strong, a professor of 
mathematics at the University from 1905 until the time of her retire- 
ment in 1948, left in her will a bequest for the Department of Mathe- 
matics. This sum of money, together with gifts made in her memory by 
friends and relatives, has been set up as a memorial fund and is used 
to aid mathematics students recommended by the mathematics staff. 

W. Raymond Taylor Scholarship in Drama. An award of $250 is 
made each year upon the recommendation of the Head of the Department 
of Drama-Speech to an entering freshman who majors in drama-speech. 
The recipient is determined through competitive audition at the Uni- 
versity during the preceding spring semester. The fund was established 
by the Broadway Theatre League of Greensboro in honor of W. Raymond 
Taylor, who was for over thirty years director of drama at the 
University. 

42 



Financial Aid 

The United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarships. The 
North Carolina Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy- 
offer scholarships at the University to descendants of Confederate 
veterans. These scholarships are worth $175 each. 

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill each year 
offers a scholarship to a graduate of the University at Greensboro. Its 
value is $650 derived as follows: university stipend, $400; supplement 
from special funds, $250. The student must pay tuition at the in-state 
rate. Application is made to the Administrative Board, Graduate School, 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Henry Weil Fellowship Fund. The late Mrs. Henry Weil of Golds- 
boro, North Carolina, established in memory of her husband a fund now 
amounting to $22,000 known as the Henry Weil Fellowship Fund. 

(1) The Henry Weil Fellowship shall be awarded each year to a mem- 
ber of the graduating class, but if there is no member of the class 
who meets the conditions of the award, the committee shall have 
the right to award the fellowship to a member of any class grad- 
uating within the preceding five years. 

(2) A committee shall be appointed by the Chancellor to assist in 
making the award. 

The Mina Weil Memorial Scholarship Fund. In memory of her 
mother, Mrs. Mina Weil, Miss Gertrude Weil has given $3,000 for the 
establishment of a scholarship in the social sciences. The income from 
this fund is awarded annually to a member of the junior or senior class 
who is majoring in a social science. 

The Mina Weil Scholarship Fund. Mrs. Janet Weil Bluethenthal 
has established an endowment of $6,000 in honor of her mother. The 
income from this fund is granted for scholarships. 

Mina Weil Special Scholarship Fund. The grandchildren of Mrs. 
Mina Weil established this scholarship as a memorial to her. It is 
awarded each year to a deserving student in need of financial assistance. 

The Winfield Scholarship Fund. Miss Martha Elizabeth Winfield, 
for many years a professor of English in the University, left an endow- 
ment of $3,000. The income is awarded each year as a scholarship to 
a needy junior or senior of promise in the Department of English. 

Annie McIver Young Scholarship. Mrs. Annie Mclver Young, 
daughter of Charles Duncan Mclver, bequeathed to the University the 
sum of $5,000, the income from which is given annually to an earnest, 
needy senior. 

43 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

The following alumnae chapters have established scholarships for 
worthy students: Forsyth, Guilford, Mecklenburg, Randolph, Wake, 
Columbia, S. C, Atlanta, Ga., and the Greater Washington Area. 



LOAN FUNDS 

Loans are based on the scholarship of the student as well as on her 
financial needs. The total amount available for any student is limited. 
All loans are secured by notes signed by the borrower and two guaran- 
tors. Interest at three per cent begins in June after graduation or after 
withdrawal from college. Loan funds are listed herein alphabetically 
by the keyword in the name of the fund. 

Amount as of 
Nome of Fund and Donor June 30, 1962 

Alamance County Chapter of the Alumnae Association $ 637 

Alumnae Class Organ 1,173 

Alumnae Loan and Scholarship 37,412 

Sarah Atkinson; Class of 1939 439 

Austin; gift of Miss Emily S. Austin, Class of 1901 1,254 

Annette Beck; Class of 1956 126 

Boyd; gift of Mrs. James Boyd 400 

Bryant; bequest of Victor S. Bryant 7,500 

Gladys Bullock Memorial; Mrs. S. F. Bullock 345 

Daphne Carraway Memorial; 

Miss Irma Carraway, Class of 1897 906 

Class of 1925 239 

Class of 1929 765 

Class of 1932 359 

Class of 1933 80 

Class of 1935 617 

Class of 1936 515 

Class of 1940 238 

Judge E. B. Cline; Mrs. E. B. Cline 50 

Laura H. Coit; faculty and students 4,500 

Ida Houghton Cowan; Miss Ida H. Cowan, Class of 1902 256 

Federation of Women's Clubs 204 

Mollie K. Fetzer; T. J. Fetzer 933 

Frank P. Graham ; Emergency 552 

Martha Irvin Groome Memorial; 

Miss Ina Lee Groome, Class of 1934 153 

Claude Heath; Mrs. W. O. Nisbet 134 

Home Economics Club 680 

Lucille Horn Memorial; Alumnae of Davie County 50 

Ivey; gift of J. B. Ivey 350 

North Carolina Association of Jewish Women 393 

44 



Financial Aid 

Nancy Lee Kiser Memorial ; Class of 1958 125 

Flora Patterson Lane; Mrs. Jean Lane Fonville 206 

Bertha Marvin Lee Memorial; Miss Cornelia Strong 155 

Liberty Hall Chapter Daughters of the 

American Revolution Membership Memorial 2,020 

Elizabeth Crow Mahler; Miss Sue May Kirkland 399 

Katharine Mavity Martin; Faculty Wives Club 300 

Masonic Theatre Educational Fund of New Bern; 

Scottish Rite Masons of Eastern North Carolina 520 

Mclver; Alumnae of the College 18,058 

McLean; gift of Miss Jessie McLean 81 

Virginia Barker Moffitt Memorial; 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Rankin Parks, Miss Serena Parks 210 

Lily Conally Morehead; Mrs. Lily Mebane 9,425 

Musgrove Memorial; 

Mrs. Jeannette Musgrove Bounds, Class of 1914 23] 

May Oettinger Memorial; Business and Professional 

Women's Club of Kinston, North Carolina 927 

Rebecca Christine Phoenix Memorial; 

Mr. John J. Phoenix and family 343 

Camilla Croom Rodman; Col. W. B. Rodman 

Winfield H. Rogers; Quill Club of 1947 180 

Royal Arch and Knights Templar 4,878 

Patty Spruill Memorial; 

Katherine D. Spruill, Commercial Class of 1931 517 

Lizzie Stewart; bequest of Florence Stewart, Class of 1905 5,011 

Student Government of 1935 431 

Students 8,948 

Mary McLean Taylor Memorial; 

Carrie McLean Taylor, Class of 1926 392 

Carrie MacRae Tillett Memorial; Mrs. C. W. Tillett 125 

Town Students 79 

Ruth Gooding Worley; 

Mrs. Ruth Worley Simmons, Class of 1935 179 

Doris Wright Memorial; citizens of Wilkes County 3,007 

Pearl Wyche; bequest of Pearl Wyche, Class of 1903 1,050 



FEDERAL STUDENT LOAN FUND 

The University participates in the student loan fund program 
established under the National Defense Education Act of 1958. 

Full-time students who are in good standing and who need financial 
aid to continue their college course may borrow up to $5,000 in the 
aggregate under the terms of this program. 



45 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Up to one-half of any loan (plus interest) is canceled for service as 
a full-time teacher in a public elementary or secondary school in a 
state, at the rate of 10% of the amount of the loan (which is unpaid 
at the time the teaching service begins) plus interest for each complete 
academic year of such service. 



STATE SCHOLARSHIP LOAN FUND 

The 1957 General Assembly enacted legislation establishing a Schol- 
arship Loan Fund for Prospective Teachers. Only 300 awards of not 
more than $350 are provided annually. 

The fund is administered by the State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, Raleigh, North Carolina. All scholarship loans are evidenced 
by notes which bear interest at the rate of 4% per annum from 
September 1 following fulfillment by a prospective teacher of the re- 
quirements for a teacher's certificate based upon the bachelor's degree. 

Scholarship loans, together with 4% interest thereon, may be can- 
celled by teaching one full year in North Carolina for each annual 
scholarship received. Consideration for a scholarship loan is given to 
the aptitude, purposef ulness, scholarship, character and financial need 
of the applicant. 

For detailed information concerning the State loan scholarship pro- 
gram, write to the Prospective Teachers Scholarship Loan Fund, State 
Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh, N. C. 



PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT 

There are a number of opportunities for part-time employment on 
campus. Students work in the dining halls, in the library, and in various 
departments. Applications for work assignments are filed with the 
Student Aid Office. 



VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

The State of North Carolina provides financial assistance (equal to 
tuition and other regular fees in the University) for residents of North 
Carolina who are physically handicapped. For further information write 
directly to the N. C. Vocational Rehabilitation Division of the State 
Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh, N. C. 



46 



PART IV. 



Admission 











Ili-r'lilffi 




IV. ADMISSION 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro accepts applications 
for admission to two groups, namely: 

Undergraduate Students — those seeking admission to this group must 
have graduated from an accredited secondary school or must have com- 
pleted special examinations required by the Admissions Policies Com- 
mittee. 

Graduate Students — those seeking admission as graduate students 
must hold a bachelor's degree from a college or university approved by 
the appropriate regional accrediting association. For more detailed in- 
formation, please see Chapter VIII of this bulletin. 

All inquiries regarding the admission of undergraduate students 
should be addressed to the Director of Admissions, The University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, N. C. Inquiries about gradu- 
ate study should be addressed to the Dean of the Graduate School, The 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, N. C. 

Application may be made for admission to regular terms beginning 
in September and January, and to the summer sessions beginning in 
June. Applications to the one-year Commercial Course and to the two- 
year course in Nursing Education are reviewed only for the term be- 
ginning in September. Early application for any term is advisable. 
Application for the January term should be filed by December 1. The 
University reserves the right to withhold the admission of any ap- 
plicant who ranked in the lower half of his graduating class in high 
school, or for other cause. The University reserves the right of final 
decision in the assignment of rooms. 

The University at Greensboro is on the approved list for the Veteran's 
Administration and may accept students for regular, retraining, or re- 
fresher courses. For more detailed information, write the Registrar. 

ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY 
UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

Admission to The University undergraduate curricula will be limited 
to applicants who can qualify under one of the following provisions: 

New Freshmen — students who meet requirements for admission to 
the freshman class as stated below but who have earned fewer than 
24 semester hours of college credit. 

Commercial Students — residents of the State of North Carolina who 
desire to complete a one-year commercial course and who meet require- 
ments for admission to this course. 

49 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Nursing Students — students who wish to earn the Associate Degree 
in Applied Science and qualify for the Registered Nurse Licensing 
Examination and who meet requirements for admission to the University. 

Transfer Students — students who meet requirements for admission 
as undergraduate students and who have earned at least 24 transferable 
semester hours of credit in another college or university. See the para- 
graph below headed Admission of Transfer Students to Advanced 
Standing. 

Former Students — students entitled to honorable dismissal and in 
good standing who were previously enrolled in the undergraduate curri- 
cula at The University at Greensboro but who did not complete the 
previous semester at the University. 

Unclassified Students — students who meet the same entrance re- 
quirements as regular students, who wish to earn college credits, and 
who have the approval of the dean of the school or the head of the 
department in which the courses are to be taken. Such students must 
abide by the same regulations as regular students. (Applicants may 
be asked to take special tests in lieu of the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
of the College Entrance Examination Board.) If at a later date an 
unclassified student changes to regular status, the credits earned while 
he was unclassified will be accepted only if he has satisfactorily com- 
pleted the proper prerequisites. 

Special Students — mature students who do not wish to earn college 
credit or work for a degree because of irregularities in qualifications 
or because of personal objectives. Such students who wish to audit 
lecture courses may be admitted by the Director of Admissions with the 
approval of the dean of the school or the head of the department in 
which the courses are to be taken. Special students who wish to enroll 
in a course in which individual instruction is given and where student 
participation is essential to the course must meet the same entrance 
requirements as regular students. (Applicants may be asked to take 
special tests in lieu of the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College 
Entrance Examination Board.) 

APPLICATION FEE. Undergraduate applicants for admission are 
required to submit an application fee of $10 with the application form. 
This fee is charged to cover the cost of processing the application; there- 
fore, it is non-refundable for all students and is not applicable toward 
the first payment for students who enroll. 

ROOM RESERVATION FEE. In order to reserve a room, a non- 
refundable deposit of $50 is required. Payment is to be sent directly to 
the Admissions Office as early as possible after the student receives 
notice of admission but no later than May 1 for students who are 

50 



Admission 

entering the following September. If the deposit is not received by May 
1, the student's application will be canceled unless she has indicated 
to the Admissions Office that she expects to be a town student. (Note: 
Campus housing is not provided for men.) 

PRE-COLLEGE TESTING. All applicants for admission to the 
freshman class, the one-year Commercial Course, or the two-year 
course in Nursing Education are required to take certain tests prior to 
matriculation. Scores on these tests, along with other criteria, will be 
used in determining the admissibility of each applicant. 

Each applicant must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College 
Entrance Examination Board, preferably in December or January of 
the senior year in high school. For information about the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test, applicants should write to the College Entrance Examin- 
ation Board, P. 0. Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. The College Entrance 
Examination Board makes a moderate charge for these tests. It will 
advise the applicants of the time and place where the tests will be given 
near their homes. (Note: only the Scholastic Aptitude Test is required, 
and not the Achievement Tests in the subject-matter fields.) Applicants 
must request the Board to send their scores on these examinations 
dirctly to the Office of Admissions, The University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro. 

ADMISSION BY SPECIAL EXAMINATION. The Admissions Poli- 
cies Committee will review the application of a student who has not 
completed high school work if he presents fifteen acceptable units with 
no deficiencies and takes the Scholastic Aptitude Test and three Achieve- 
ment Tests of the College Entrance Examination Board. One of the 
Achievement Tests must be in English and one in social studies with 
the third being chosen from science, mathematics, or foreign language. 

EARLY DECISION PLAN. The University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro offers early admission by November 15 of the student's 
senior year in high school for the well qualified student who has definitely 
decided to enter the University at Greensboro if accepted. To be con- 
sidered under the Early Decision Plan, a student must take the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board during the 
junior year in high school and must complete the application by October 
1 of the senior year. 

Requirements for admission under this plan are more selective than 
under the regular admissions program. Students whose applications are 
not accepted under the Early Decision Plan will have their applications 
reviewed as regular candidates. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM. A student who participates 
in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examina- 

51 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

tion Board may have his record considered for advanced placement 
and/or credit at the University. He should instruct the College Entrance 
Examination Board to forward his credentials to the University at 
Greensboro upon completion of the examination in May of the senior 
year in high school. 

ADMISSION TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS. Admission to the fresh- 
man class implies that the applicant may eventually become a candidate 
for a Bachelor's degree. A candidate for admission to the freshman 
class should submit on forms obtained from the Director of Admissions 
an official record of his secondary school course, recommendations from 
the principal as to his character and ability, and a recent medical report 
from his physician. If accepted for admission, the applicant should 
write immediately to the Director of Admissions acknowledging accept- 
ance of the appointment. 

An applicant for admission to the freshman class may be admitted 
by certificate after graduation from an accredited school, or by examina- 
tion. He should present at least fifteen acceptable units of credit. A 
unit is defined here as credit given for a course taken in secondary 
school which meets for one period daily during the entire school year. 
For admission to candidacy for any Bachelor's degree, the student must 
present eleven and one-half of the fifteen units in the following subjects: 

English 4 

Foreign language (no credit recognized if less than two 

year in one foreign language is offered) 2 

Mathematics (Algebra l x /£, geometry 1) 2Vz 

Social Science (history 1, elective in history, economics, 

sociology, or civics 1) 2 

Science 1 

It is recommended that students in the Nursing Education course 
present credit for courses in Biology and in Chemistry. For the Bachelor 
of Arts in Music or the Bachelor of Music degree, entrance units in 
music must be established. This work is usually taken in private lessons. 
For the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with a major in Art, 1 unit of 
typewriting is recommended. 

The remainder of the fifteen units may include additional study in 
any of the courses above and also from the following: art, Bible, music, 
biology, chemistry, general science, physics, foreign language, solid 
geometry, plane trigonometry, geography, speech, home economics, com- 
mercial arithmetic, shorthand, typewriting, bookkeeping. Not more than 
3 units in vocational subjects {i.e., shorthand, typewriting, bookkeep- 
ing, home economics) taken in secondary school may be included in the 
15 units required for admission to the University. Less than one-half 
unit will not be allowed in any subject. 

52 



Admission 

Students who have not completed some of the prescribed units but 
who are otherwise qualified for admission may submit their credentials 
and will be given special consideration if their records warrant. 

Every effort should be made to remove entrance deficiencies during 
the summer before entering college. Sometimes students are required 
to remove these deficiencies as a condition of admission. However, if 
students are allowed to enroll at the University with deficiencies, these 
deficiencies must be removed before the student can be classified a 
sophomore. 

ADMISSION TO THE COMMERCIAL COURSE. The University 
offers a one-year Commercial Course for students who are bona fid/e 
residents of the state of North Carolina. Students earning a Commercial 
Certificate at the end of this period will have qualified for positions as 
clerks, bookkeepers, and secretaries. More detailed information regarding 
these courses may be found on page of this catalogue. To be admitted 
to the program, an applicant must present a satisfactory high school 
record indicating graduation with fifteen prescribed units of work from 
an accredited secondary school, present a recommendation from the 
high school, and meet the Scholastic Aptitude Test requirements. 

Students who have not completed some of the prescribed units but 
who are otherwise qualified for admission may submit their credentials 
and will be given special consideration if their records warrant. Often 
students are required to remove deficiencies as a condition of admission 
to the Commercial Course. 

ADMISSION TO THE NURSING EDUCATION PROGRAM. The 

University offers a two-year nursing education program leading to an 
Associate Degree in Applied Science. Graduates of the program are 
prepared for registered nurse responsibilities. Admission requirements 
are the same as for entering freshmen, with the additional recom- 
mendation that biology and chemistry be included in the high school 
units presented for admission. 

ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS TO ADVANCED 
STANDING. A student transferring to this institution from another 
college or university must fulfill the requirements for admission to the 
freshman class. Scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test are required if 
the student has fewer than 24 semester hours that will transfer to the 
University. An official transcript from the secondary school and from 
each college previously attended showing honorable dismissal must be 
presented. Recommendations should be sent from each institution pre- 
viously attended. A catalogue of the institution from which he transfers, 
marked to indicate the courses taken, should accompany the application. 
(Applicants may be asked to take special tests as a condition of ad- 
mission.) Application forms and official transcripts should be filed with 

53 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

the Director of Admissions before April 1 for those seeking to enter 
the first semester, and before December 1 for those seeking to enter the 
second semester. 

Transfer students who enter the University after attendance at 
junior colleges will receive transfer credit for no more than 64 semester 
hours plus two semester hours of physical education. 

An average of at least C in all previous college work attempted and 
in transferable courses is required for admission to advanced standing. 
A course passed with the lowest passing grade at another institution 
does not give hours credit toward graduation, but may be used to satisfy 
a subject requirement of the University. The quality as well as the 
quantity of the student's previous college work will receive consideration 
when credit to be allowed is determined. Should the student's work 
during the first year at the University prove unsatisfactory, the amount 
of transfer credit allowed may be reduced. 

ADMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS. Students entitled to hon- 
orable dismissal and in good standing who were previously enrolled in 
the undergraduate curricula but who did not complete the previous 
semester should apply for readmission to the Director of Admissions. 
If such students have earned credits at another college or university 
since last attending The University at Greensboro, they must submit an 
official transcript of credit from that institution before they can be 
readmitted. 

HOUSING 

The University reserves the right to approve the housing of all 
students whether they live on or off the campus. The administration is 
authorized to establish minimum standards of health, safety, and general 
welfare in regard to housing and to require that students maintain their 
residence in quarters which comply with these standards. 

Every student is required to keep on file in the appropriate office 
the complete and correct address of his place of residence, both home 
and local. 

SUMMER SESSION 

The University at Greensboro operates a Summer Session of six 
weeks. Classes are organized on a two-, four-, or six-weeks basis, en- 
abling students to carry on a program of studies in the various depart- 
ments best suited to their summer needs. Upper-division undergraduate 
courses and graduate courses are open to graduate students desiring 
credit on their advanced degree programs or renewal of their teaching 
certificates. When possible to do so, students may carry any com- 

54 



Admission 

bination of two-, four-, or six-weeks courses as long as they do not 
carry a load of more than one credit hour per week. Special workshops 
and conferences enrich the opportunities for summer session study. 

Graduate students contemplating the continuation of their study 
during the summer, or initiating summer work, should make applica- 
tion to the Graduate School at Greensboro and apply for summer study 
through the office of the director of the Summer Session. 



EXTENSION COURSES, WORKSHOPS, INSTITUTES 
AND SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro desires to render 
aid to teachers in service by arranging for courses for credit toward 
a degree or certificate, and to offer to them and to other citizens of the 
state cultural and professional courses. The State does not provide this 
service except as it may be self-supporting; but afternoon or evening 
courses can be arranged at a minimum cost to persons on or off the 
campus. Television courses are also offered for credit. Lecture series and 
individual lectures by members of the faculty can be arranged. For 
graduate students who register for extension work, up to 6 semester 
hours of graduate credit may be counted toward the Master's degree. 

A series of conferences, usually concentrated in the summer, are 
held on the campus. These conferences are planned as a service to the 
state and as a contribution particularly to girls and women who may 
participate in them. Inquiries about the program of the Extension Divi- 
sion should be addressed to the Director of Extension, The University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, N. C. 



55 



PART V. 



Degrees 







.'":, ' 



■■' : : '•' ■■ 



■..->-;; if 



V. DEGREES 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is a member of 
the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the 
Association of American Colleges, the American Council on Education, 
American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, the Southern 
Association of Colleges for Women, the North Carolina College Con- 
ference, and the National Commission of Accrediting. Its graduates 
are eligible to membership in the American Association of University 
Women. 

The University confers seven undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education, Bachelor of Science in 
Secretarial Administration, Bachelor of Fine Arts, and Bachelor of 
Science in Medical Technology. An Associate in Applied Science in Nurs- 
ing is given for the two-year program in Nursing. A certificate is given 
those who complete the one year commercial course. Certain curricula 
of the Graduate School of the University are also offered at the Uni- 
versity. These curricula are in the fields of Biology, Business Education 
and Secretarial Administration, Education, English, History, Home 
Economics, Music, Physical Education, Psychology, and Fine Arts. 

The minimum quality point ratio (see p. 96) required of all Bachelor's 
degrees is 2.0. The two years of required physical education are not 
included in this computation. 

A student who qualifies may do honors work (see p. 82). 

Courses primarily for freshmen are designed as Grade I, numbered 
100-199; those primarily for sophomores as Grade II, 200-299; those 
primarily for juniors and seniors as Grade III, 300-399. Grade IV, 
400-499, indicates courses primarily for seniors. Grade V, 500-599, in- 
cludes courses open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students, 
courses numbered 600-699 are open only to graduate students. Fresh- 
men are admitted to courses of Grade II and sophomores to those of 
Grade III only by special permission given by The Associate Dean 
and the instructor concerned. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The minimum requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Arts is the 
completion of 122 semester hours with a 2.0 quality point ratio (see 
p. 96). The hours required must include the following: 

59 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Courses S.H. 

English 101-102 1 0-6 

Humanities 12 

History 101-1021 0-6 

Social Science (above Grade I) 6 

Foreign Language 6-18 

Natural Science and Mathematics 12-14 

Physical Education 2 

Major Subject above Grade I 24-36 

Electives and other non-major requirements 

including teacher certification 20-62 



122 
These requirements are subject to the following restrictions: 

Foreign Language: 

The languages which meet this requirement are French, German, 
Greek, Latin, Russian, and Spanish. The following criteria will be em- 
ployed in determining the number of hours required: 
High School language 
confirmed by examination 

1. Less than 2 years 18 

2. 2 to 3 years 12 

3. 4 years (if language offered is continued) 6 

Humanities: 

The humanities required may be met by the following: 

A. English 211 3 hours 

B. English 202 or 212 or 252 2 3 hours 

C. Six hours from the following 6 hours 

Art 103, 325, 330, 334, 341, 349. 

Classical Civilization 111, 335, 336, 397, 398 

Drama 121, 333 

English 105, 201, 202, 212, 251, 252, 337, 338, 339, 340, 

342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 357, 358, 359, 360, 371, 382, 507, 

508, 536, 541, 550, 555, 556 
French 207, 208, 313, 327, 330, 331, 340, 345, 373 
German 317-318, 321, 322, 325, 326, 327, 328, 332, 345, 

346, 401 
Greek 201-202, 203-204, 325, 326, 401, 402, 403, 404 
History 215, 216, 549, 550, 569, 570 

!For exceptionally well qualified students this requirement can be waived by special 
examination. 

2 In exceptional cases students may be permitted to take English 251 in place of 
English 252, and English 201 in place of English 202. 

60 



Requirements for Bachelor's De:ree 

Home Economics 504, 514, 538 

Latin 103-104, 201-202, 301, 302, 303, 326, 333, 402 

Music 141, 331, 332, 341, 342, 431, 432 

Philosophy 111, 221, 311, 312, 321, 322, 323, 348 

Physical Education 354, 522, 523 

Russian 507, 508 

Spanish 207, 208, 321, 324, 326, 327, 328, 334 

No student may meet the Humanities "C" requirement by work in 
his major field. Courses taken as part of the Foreign Language require- 
ment cannot also be counted as part of the Humanities requirement. A 
course taken to meet the Humanities "B" requirement cannot also be 
counted as part of the Humanities "C" requirement. At least three hours 
credit must be taken from approved humanities electives in art, drama, 
music, dance, or philosophy. 

Natural Science and Mathematics: 

The following combinations of courses will meet this requirement: 
If first year science or Second year should be : 

mathematics was : 
Biology Chemistry, mathematics, or 

physics 
Chemistry Biology, Geography 211-212, 

mathematics, Psychology 211-212 
Mathematics Biology, chemistry, or physics 

Physics Biology, Geography 211-212, 

mathematics, Psychology 211-212 

No student may offer geography in partial fulfillment of both the 
Natural Science and the Social Science requirement. 

Social Science Above Grade I: 

The 6 hours above Grade I may be taken in history, political science, 
economics, sociology, anthropology, or geography. No student may 
offer geography in partial fulfillment of both the Social Science and the 
Natural Science requirement. 

Major Subject: 

The departmental major is composed of a sequence of courses within 
one department. The following subjects offer an opportunity for a 
departmental major: art, biology, chemistry, drama-speech, 1 economics, 
English, French, geography, German, Greek, history, Latin, mathe- 
matics, music, philosophy, physics, political science 2 , psychology, 
Spanish, and sociology. 



1 A student majoring in drama may take up to 6 hours of speech in addition to the 
36 hours in drama above grade I. 

2 A student majoring in political science or history cannot have more than a total of 
42 hours of work in history and political science, beyond the required freshman history, 
count toward graduation. 

61 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

A student must take not less than 24 nor more than 36 hours in 
courses above Grade I in the major subject; except that whenever, dur- 
ing her freshman year, the student takes courses above Grade I in lieu 
of Grade I courses in her major subject, the maximum number of hours 
in that subject accepted toward graduation will be increased by the 
number of hours so taken. The student should consult the dean or 
department head for specific course requirements in his major subject. 

Two interdepartmental majors are available: elementary education; 
recreation. 

Electives: 

Electives open to freshmen: Art 101, 103; Astronomy 101; Biology 
121; Classical Civilization 111; Drama 121; Economics 111; English 105; 
Geography 101; Health 101; History 105; Music 141; Philosophy 111; 
Sociology 111; Speech 111. 

Upper-class electives may be chosen from the various subject matter 
fields outside the major field and within the limitation of B.S. and B.M. 
hours. (See p. 78 for the latter.) 

Applied music may be taken for elective credit by any student pro- 
vided the music faculty grants permission after an entrance test per- 
formance. Twelve hours is the maximum credit allowed in applied music 
toward a Bachelor of Arts Degree in major fields other than music. 
Freshmen may take no more than 4 hours of applied music. 

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS 

Freshman and Sophomore requirements must ordinarily be taken in 
the freshman and sophomore years. A student who has not completed 
freshman requirements at the end of the freshman year or sophomore 
requirements at the end of the sophomore year may be placed on 
summer school probation by the Academic and Personnel Committee to 
complete these deficiencies before entering the sophomore or junior year. 
In exceptional cases a required subject may, with the consent of the 
faculty adviser and The Associate Dean, be taken later than the 
freshman and sophomore years. 

Freshmen are expected to register for the following courses: 

Courses S.H. 

English 101-102 0-6 

History 101-102 0-6 

Foreign Language 6 

Biology 101-102; Chemistry 101-102, or 103-104; 
Mathematics 103-104, or 121, 217; or Physics 
101-102 6-8 

62 



Requirements for Bachelor's Degree 

Electives 6 

Physical Education 1 

Freshmen planning to teach should elect Health 101 

Some exceptions to these requirements follow: 

Premedical students and those preparing to be medical laboratory 
technologists are advised to take biology and chemistry in the freshman 
year and two science courses in the sophomore year. 

Students who plan to major in biology, chemistry, or physics are 
strongly urged to take a science and mathematics or two sciences in the 
freshman year. 

Students who plan to major in mathematics and who wish to secure 
a certificate to teach general science also are advised to choose both 
mathematics and a science in the freshman year. 

Sophomores are expected to register for the following courses: 

Courses S.H. 

Humanities 6-12 

Foreign Language (continuation of freshman 

language) see page 60 6 

Science or Mathematics (see page 60) 6-8 

Social Science (Grade II, see page 60) 6 

Electives (Grade II) 6 

Physical Education 1 

Sophomores planning to teach should elect Psychology 221. 



JUNIOR-SENIOR REQUIREMENTS 

In his junior and senior year each candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts must complete a considerable amount of work in a field 
of concentration. The selection of the field for intensive study shall be 
made by the student after consultation with his faculty adviser or 
academic class adviser not later than the second semester of his sopho- 
more year. Vocational counseling is available to students needing help 
in choosing a field of study. 

Courses fulfilling the requirements for graduation in the fields of 
concentration shall be above Grade I. At least 36 of the student's last 
60 hours shall be of Grade III or above, and not more than 12 of the last 
60 may be of Grade I. When, however, this regulation will work a special 
hardship upon a student, adjustments may be made by the Associate 
Dean and the student's major adviser. 



63 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

TEACHER EDUCATION 

All students must make formal application for admission to teacher 
education. 

Each student seeking; to enter the Teacher Education Program must 
have a recommendation from the dean or department head in the school 
or department in which he is majoring*. 

To be eligible to take supervised teaching, a 2.0 quality-point ratio 
is generally required, a recommendation by the dean or department head 
who is the student's major adviser, and evidence of satisfactorily meet- 
ing the speech requirement. 

Students desiring to teach in the high school, may credit not more 
than 15 hours of Education toward the Bachelor of Arts degree. Students 
taking the Bachelor of Science degree may take 18 hours of Education 
upon the advice of the major adviser and The Associate Dean. Students 
preparing to teach in the elementary grades may credit 21 hours of 
Education toward the Bachelor of Arts degree; except that where a 
student offers for graduation courses required by the North Carolina 
Department of Public Instruction specifically for certification in Special 
Education, 24 hours of Education are allowed. 

Interdepartmental Majors 

Interdepartmental majors are offered in the following areas: Ele- 
mentary Education and Recreation. 

An interdepartmental major includes work in two or three depart- 
ments. When in two departments, not less than 15 hours nor more than 
21 shall be offered in one subject, the minimum total to be 36 hours 
above Grade I. When in three departments, not less than 9 hours in a 
subject shall be offered toward the major, the minimum total to be 
42 hours. 

Requirements for the two interdepartmental majors are listed on 
the following pages. Additional information will be furnished upon 
request. 

Interdepartmental Major in Elementary Education 

Courses S.H. 

English 101-102 0-6 

Humanities: English 211, and 202 or 212 or 252 6 

Philosophy, Art, Music, Drama or Dance 3 

Elective in humanities 3 

History 101-102 0- 6 

History 211, 212 6 

Biology 101-102 6 

Mathematics 103-104 or 301, 302 6 

64 






Requirements for Bachelor's Degree 

Foreign Language (one) 6-18 

Chemistry 201 3 

Physics 201 3 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 2 

Health & Physical Education 3 

Art 101, 333 6 

Music 361 3 

Geography 335 and elective in regional geography . . 6 

Political Science 321 or 322 3 

Psychology 221 1 3 

*Electives (to be used in academic concentration) ... 12 

Education, 330, 443, 444, 446, 481, 463 21 

Total minimum requirement 122 

* Students must develop an academic concentration of 18 
s. h. above Grade I in one of the following areas: English, 
foreign language, history, mathematics, science, social 
studies. If a student selects social studies as the area of 
concentration, Sociology 211, 212, Economics 325, and a 
history or anthropology course in an area outside the 
Western world must be included. 

All students are required to take the speech screening test. Any 
required work to remove deficiencies in speech must be accomplished 
before the application to student teaching will be approved. 

Interdepartmental Major in Recreation 

An interdepartmental major in Recreation leading to a Bachelor of 
Arts degree is offered by the Departments of Sociology and Physical 
Education. 

A committee composed of one member from each of the departments 
of Sociology and Physical Education administers the program. A stu- 
dent will be admitted to this major only after approval by the two 
departments. The following is the curriculum: 

Fresh man- Sophomore Requirements 

Courses S.H. 

English 101, 102 0- 6 

Humanities (see page 60) 12 

History 101-102 0- 6 

Sociology 211, 212 6 

Natural Science & Mathematics 12-14 

Foreign Language 6-18 

Physical Education 241 3 

^ay be satisfied with credit in Psychology 211-212. 

65 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 



Physical Education 
Elective 1 



Junior-Senior Requirements 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Courses S.H. Courses S.H. 

Physical Education 339, 334 2 1 Economics 325 3 

Physical Education 344, 342 3 2 Drama 391 or 596 3 

Speech 217 2 Physical Ed. 336 or 337 1 

Sociology 325 2 Physical Ed. 338, 340, 343 . 4 

Sociology 333, 440 3 3 Sociology 326 3 

Art 336 3 Elective Sociology 3 

Health 236 1 Elective (B.S. 1 ) 2 

Political Science 322 3 Elective 2 ? 

Elective 2 



Summer Experience: Between the sophomore and junior years, a 
student will be expected to have a playground or camp counseling 
experience, approved by the committee administering the Recreation 
major. During the summer between her junior and senior years, the 
committee will work out a summer experience suited to the student's 
particular range of interests. 

PREPROFESSIONAL STUDY 

P remedied I Program 

The premedical program is based upon the assumption that a broad 
liberal education is the best possible background for later professional 
medical work. A student may complete the requirements for the Bach- 
elor of Arts degree and fulfill the requirements for entrance into medi- 
cal college by majoring in any field. Premedical students are advised 
to take biology and chemistry in their freshman year, and two science 
courses in their sophomore year. Elective subjects should be chosen in 
careful consultation with the adviser with a view to a well-balanced 
program in the social sciences and the humanities as well as in the 
physical and biological sciences. The Committee on Pre-professional 
Education in Medicine has the responsibility for developing the broad 
outlines of the premedical program on this campus. Additional infor- 
mation about the program may be obtained from the Director of 
Admissions. 



iTwo-hour elective to be taken in one of the B.S. departments other than the 
Department of Physical Education. If the student takes a three-hour course, only two 
of the three hours shall count in credit. Courses elected must be taken from those 
approved for B.A. credit. 

2The twenty-one semester hours of electives are to be taken in two or more B.A. 
departments other than Sociology. The humanities requirements must be completed in 
elective hours. 



66 



Eequirements for Bachelor's Degree 

Medical Laboratory Technology Program 

Two courses of instruction are offered to those students who wish to 
pursue the profession of Medical Technology. The first of these pro- 
grams is one in which the student takes four years at the University 
after which she is granted a Bachelor of Arts degree. After graduating, 
the student takes an additional year of study and training in a medical 
school or hospital of Medical Technology which has been approved for 
this training by the American Society of Clinical Pathologists. 

The second course of study is one in which the student receives her 
first three years at the University and the fourth year at the Depart- 
ment of Medical Technology of the School of Medicine, University of 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The University grants the 
student a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology after the 
completion of the fourth year, and she is then eligible for certification 
by the A. S. C. P. 

Five- Year Program. A student may prepare for the five-year program 
by meeting the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree in either 
of two ways, that is, by majoring in biology and taking the necessary 
supporting courses in chemistry or by majoring in chemistry and taking 
the necessary supporting courses in biology. 

Students taking this program are advised to take biology and chem- 
istry in their freshman year and two science courses in their sophomore 
year. The head of the department in which the student majors and the 
co-ordinator for the programs in Medical Technology will advise each 
student in planning her program. A graduate of this program is not 
eligible for certification by the American Society of Clinical Patholo- 
gists until she has had a year's training or apprenticeship with an 
A. S. C. P. approved pathologist in an A. S. C. P. approved hospital. 

Four- Year Program. An outline for the four-year program leading 
to a Bachelor of Sicence degree in Medical Technology follows: 

Course of Study 

Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

Courses S.H. Courses S.H. 

Biology 101-102 6 Biology 271, 277 6 

Chemistry 101-102 or Chemistry 231-332 8 

103-104 8 English 211 and 212 or 

English 101-102 0-6 252 or 202 6 

Foreign Language 6 Foreign Language (con- 
History 101-102 0-6 tinuation of language 

Physical Education 1 taken in Freshman year) . . 6 

— Mathematics 103-104 6 

33 Physical Education 1 

33 

67 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 



Junior Year 
Courses S.H. 

Biology 582 3 

Biology 383 3 

Chemistry 221 4 

Chemistry 4 

Electives 1 15 



Senior Year 2 
The 12 months program in 
Medical Technology in 
the School of Medicine 
at the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill, North Carolina, in- 
cludes the following 
courses: 

Courses S.H. 

Bacteriology, Parasitology, 

Serology 9*£ 

Biochemistry, Basal 

Metabolism 9^ 

Clinical Microscopy 4V& 

Ethics, Laboratory Man- 
agement 1 

Hematology, Blood Bank . . . 9Vfe 

Tissue Technique 5 



Total for three years 



32 39 

96 hrs. Complete total for 4 years 135 hrs. 



The course of study in the four- and five-year programs in Medical 
Technology is essentially the same during the freshman year. At the 
end of the freshman year the student should decide which program he 
wishes to follow. Students who complete the five-year plan of study 
have the choice of many electives in the social sciences and advanced 
courses in chemistry and biology. 

For further information, write to Director of Admissions, University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, N. C. 

Preprofessiona! Program in Physical Therapy 

A sequence of courses has been planned for students who are pre- 
paring themselves for professional education in physical therapy. Stu- 
dents' programs can be planned so that they will meet all requirements 
for admission to the Department of Physical Therapy in the School of 
Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



2 Six of the 15 hours of electives must be used to complete the social science require- 
ment. Histology may be taken in the sophomore year, or it may be taken as an 
elective in the junior year. 

2School of Medicine, University of North Carolina. 

The Committee on Medical Technology will review at the end of the sophomore year 
the records of those students who are candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in 
Medical Technology. 



68 



Requirements for Bachelor's Degree 

A member of the faculty will advise all students interested in the 
preprofessional program in physical therapy. Students should see the 
adviser before registering for the freshman year. Additional informa- 
tion about this program may be obtained from the Director of Admis- 
sions. 



Preprofessional Program in Social Work 

The Department of Sociology has planned a sequence of courses for 
those students who are preparing themselves for graduate professional 
education in social work, and also for those students who wish to qualify 
for positions in social agencies for which graduate professional educa- 
tion is not now required. The University holds constituent membership 
in the Council on Social Work Education. 

The head of the Department of Sociology will advise all students 
interested in the preprofessional program in social work. 



Pre-Engineering Curriculum 

A two year pre-engineering curriculum is offered. The program is 
planned for students who may transfer to North Carolina State of the 
University of North Carolina at Raleigh. The program is as follows: 

Freshman Year 

S.H. 

General Chemistry 103-104 8 

General Physics 103-104 8 

English 101-102 6 

History 101-102 6 

Analytic Geometry 217 3 

Calculus I 218 3 

Physical Education 1 

35 

Sophomore Year 

English 211, and 212, or 202, or 252 6 

Principles of Economics 211-212 6 

Calculus II 219 3 

Calculus III 318 3 

Physics 324 (Mechanics) 3 

Differential Equations 432 3 



69 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Electives 6 

Physical Education 1 

31 



Pre-Legal Program 

Students who plan to prepare for Law School may select their major 
in any field. Law Schools do not generally require that applicants for 
admission present college credit in any specified subjects. Students are 
selected primarily on the basis of their college records, material fur- 
nished in their application for admission, and their score on the Law 
School Admission Test. A prelegal adviser will counsel interested 
students. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

The School of Home Economics offers several curricula, organized to 
meet specialized subject-matter interests and the requirements of official 
groups responsible for the accrediting of professional training courses. 

The minimum requirement for the degree is the completion of 122 
semester hours with a 2.0 quality point ratio (see p. 90). The distribu- 
tion of hours is as follows : 

Courses S.H. 

English 101-102 ••••••• 0- 6 1 

Humanities 

A. English 211 3 

B. Three hours from the following: 3 

212 or 252 or 202 

Science (see requirements for each sequence below) 12-14 

History 101-102 0- 6 1 

Social Science above grade I 6 2 

Foreign Language (one) or reading knowledge . . . 12 3 

Art 101 3 

Physical Education 2 



1 For exceptionally well qualified students, this requirement can be waived by special 
examination. 

2 For certain specified sequences (Foods and Nutrition, Institution Management, 
Home Economics Education and Interior Design, the remaining six must be in economics 
and/or sociology. 

3 To prove a reading knowledge of a language, a student must take an examination, 
the result of which will be judged for accuracy in understanding of the pages read. 



70 



Requirements for Bachelor's Degree 

Home Economics: 

Core H.E. 101, 103, 205, 302, 405, 412, 446 18 

Major 17-22 

Non-Home Economics courses required in various 

Home Economics majors 3-24 

Electives 8-33 

Home Economics 0-15 

Other 0-33 

The major sequences in Home Economics are: Child Development and 
Family Relations; Clothing; Textiles; Food and Nutrition; Institution 
Management; Home Economics Education; Interior Design; and General 
Home Economics. 

Child Development and Family Relations: Science (six hours must be 
taken in biology, chemistry, or physics; the remaining six may be in 
mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, or Psychology 211-212); 
Psychology 221 or 211-212, Psychology 337 or 348, Psychology 342; 
Education 413, 424, 481, H.E. 213, 462, 500, 522, 532, 592; home economics 
electives and general college electives 14 S.H. 

Merrill-Palmer appointments: Juniors or seniors in this major are 
eligible each semester of the academic year to attend the Merrill-Palmer 
Institute in Detroit, Michigan, where they have an opportunity for 
special study in Child Development. Students should make application 
early in their junior year to the Dean of the School of Home Economics. 

Clothing: Science (6-8 hours must be taken in chemistry, physics, 
Psychology 211-212, or Biology 101-102); Psychology 221, if Psychology 
211-212 was not elected; Art 224 and one additional art elective; H.E. 
301, 311, 341, 504, 514, 561, 571; home economics electives and general 
college electives 21 S.H. 

Textiles: Science (eight hours must be taken in chemistry; the re- 
maining six in physics, organic chemistry or mathematics); H.E. 341, 
514, 524, 541, 561; Art 224, and 6 semester hours of a natural science 
and/or mathematics. Home Economics electives and General College 
electives 27 S.H. 

Foods and Nutrition: Chemistry 101-102, Biology 101-102; Physics 
301; Biology 277, 381; Chemistry 225, 326; social science (economics, 
sociology or Psychology 221); Education methods or principles; H.E. 
303, 313, 503, 515, 533, 573, 583, 593; home economics electives and 
general college electives 8 S.H. 

Institution Management: Chemistry 101-102, Biology 101-102; Chem- 
istry 225, 326; Biology 277, 381; Business Education 338; Education 
methods or principles; economics, sociology, psychology (9 S.H. from 
at least two of these departments); H.E. 303, 313, 503, 509, 519, 520, 549, 
593, 573; home economics electives and general college electives 8 S.H. 

71 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Home Economics Education: Chemistry 101-102, Biology 101-102; 
Mathematics 301; Physics 301; Psychology 221; Education 350, 481; H.E. 
213, 303, 307, 311, 341, 467, 478, 515; home economics electives and 
general college electives 8 S.H. 

To be admitted to the Home Economics Education program students 
must attain an overall 2.0 grade average and a 2.25 grade average in 
home economics courses before enrolling in the first professional course 
in home economics, H.E. 307. 

Interior Design: Science (six hours must be taken in biology, chem- 
istry or physics; the remaining six may be mathematics, biology, 
chemistry, physics, or Psychology 211-212); Art Electives 12 S.H.; 
Physics 301 (unless Physics 101-102 has been elected); H.E. 305, 341, 
345, 500, 515, 535, 536, 546, 555, 575; home economics electives and 
general college electives 19 S.H. 

General Home Economics: Science (see Natural Science, p. 56); 
H.E. 213, 301, 303, 515; H.E. courses above Grade II 6 S.H.; Physics 
301 (unless Physics 101-102 has been elected); home economics electives 
and general college electives 33 S.H. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The minimum requirement for the degree is the completion of 122 
semester hours with a 2.0 quality point ratio (see p. 90). 

Courses S.H. 

English 101-1021 - 6 

Foreign Language 2 6 or 12 

History 101-102 1 - 6 

Social Science above Grade I 6 

Humanities 9 

a. English 211 3 S.H. 

b. English 212, or 202, or 252 3 S.H. 

c. Humanties elective 3 S.H. 

Natural Science and Mathematics 12 - 14 

a. Biology 101-102 

b. Chemistry, or Mathematics, or 
physics, or biology 

The Department of Physical Education offers five sequences which 
are organized to meet specialized interest of students and the require- 
ments of state and national accrediting agencies in professional edu- 
cation in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. The five sequences 

*For exceptionally well qualified students, this requirement can be waived by special 
examination. 

2lf a student chooses to continue language offered for admission, 6 hours will fulfill 
this requirement. 

72 



Requirements for Bachelor's Degree 

within the department are: Teacher Education, Dance Education, Rec- 
creation in Physical Education, Corrective Physical Education, and 
Dance Performance. 

Physical education major students are required by the Department 
of Physical Education to complete the following hours in physical edu- 
cation activities: 12 

Freshman Year — First semester: Physical Education 111 (recrea- 
tional sports, speedball, swimming, body mechanics, social dance), 6 
hours weekly, one-half credit. Second semester: Physical Education 112 
(volleyball, gymnastics, stunts, swimming, modern dance, Softball, 
tennis), 6 hours weekly, one-half credit. 

Sophomore Year — First semester: Physical Education 211 (hockey, 
badminton, modern dance, swimming, tap dance, basketball), 6 hours 
weekly, one-half credit. Second semester: Physical Education 212 (bowl- 
ing, folk dance, archery, swimming, golf and coaching), 7 hours weekly, 
one-half credit. 

Junior Year — First semester: Physical Education 359 (hockey, soc- 
cer, basketball coaching and officiating, tennis, gymnastic teaching, 
marching and apparatus), 6 hours weekly, 2 credits; Physical Educa- 
tion 351 — as laboratory hours — (child rhythms, English country dance, 
stunts). Second semester: Physical Education 360 (folk dance teaching, 
intramurals, marching, modern dance, camp leadership theory, Ameri- 
can country dance, track and field, Softball coaching and officiating), 8 
hours weekly, 2 credits. Included in the Camp Program in June of the 
junior year: volleyball coaching and officiating, water-front supervision, 
swimming methods, recreational sports, boating and canoeing, practical 
camp leadership. 

Senior Year — First semester: Physical Education 469 (sports offici- 
ating and coaching, modern dance), 5 hours weekly, 1 credit. Second 
semester: Physical Education 470 (sports officiating and coaching, 
bowling, squash, fencing, handball, lacrosse, golf methods), 5 hours 
weekly, 1 credit. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

The Department of Business Education and Secretarial Admini- 
stration offers five sequences of courses to provide specialization during 
the junior-senior years. The sequences are designed to meet special 
interests of students and the requirements for specific types of business 
and teaching positions. 



"Majors in Dance Education and Dance Performance must complete these hours in 
areas of dance and selected sports. 



73 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

The minimum requirements for a degree are completion of 126 
hours with a 2.0 quality point ratio (see p. 96). Not more than 45 of 
the 126 hours shall be in Business Education and Secretarial Admini- 
stration courses. 

Uniform Requirements 

Courses S.H. 

English 101-1021 6 

Humanities 9 

A. English 211 

B. One course from courses designated 
Humanities "B" 

2 C. One 3-credit course from courses 
designated Humanities "C" 

Social Studies 12-18 

History 101-102 1 , 213^ 
Economics 211-212 
Geography 237 

4 Natural Science and Mathematics 9 

Mathematics 3 or 6 

Biology, Chemistry, or Physics 

5 Foreign Language (one) 6-12 

Economics 233-234 6 

Business Education 111, 112 2 

Psychology 221 6 3 

Physical Education 2 



49 or 67 



REQUIREMENTS FOR SEQUENCES 

The five sequences are: Basic Business Teacher, Comprehensive 
Business Teacher, Distributive Education, Merchandising, and Secretarial. 
Requirements for the sequences are: 

Basic Business Teacher: Economics elective, 6 s. h.; Business Edu- 
cation 213, 214, 333, 501 or 502 and additional course in accounting, 504, 
506, 509; Education 350, 481; Business Education 351, 352, 465, 468; 
additional Business or Economics, 6 s. h.; Health 101 or 301; electives, 
5 or 11 s. h. 



*For exceptionally well qualified students, this requirement can be waived by special 
examination. 

2 May be taken during junior or senior year. 

3 Students who take History 211 should substitute History 212. 

4 Six semester hours should be scheduled in freshman year. 

5 When the language offered for entrance is continued, only six hours will be required. 

'Psychology 211-212 may be substituted. 



74 



Requirements for Bachelor's Degree 

Comprehensive Business Teacher: Economics electives 6 s. h.; Busi- 
ness Education 213, 214, 321-322, 333, 423, 424, 501 or 502, 509; 
Education 350, 481; Business Education 351, 352, 465, 468; Additional 
Business or Economics, 3 s. h.; Health 101 or 301; electives 5 or 11 s. h. 

Distributive Education: Economics 530, Economics elective, 3 s. h.; 
Business Education 506, 507, 508, 518, 550 (2 s. h.); Art 101; Home 
Economics 341 or Psychology 535; Education 350, 481; Business Edu- 
cation 351, 352, 465, 468; additional Business or Economics, 6 s. h.; 
Health 101 or 301; electives, 5 or 11. 

Merchandising : Economics 530, Economics electives, 6 s. h. ; Business 
Education 314, 501 or 502, 506, 507, 508, 509, 518, 550 (2 s. h.); Art 
101, 224; Speech 341; Home Economics 341; Psychology 535; electives, 
12 or 18 s. h. 

Secretarial: Economics 431 and Economics elective, 3 s. h. ; Business 
Education 213, 214, 314, 321-322, 333, 423, 424, 501 or 502, 504, 509; 
additional Business or Economics, 3 s. h.; electives, 21 or 27 s. h. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS 1 

The minimum requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts 
is the completion of 128 semester hours with a 2.0 quality point ratio 
(see p. 96). The hours required must include: 

Courses S.H. 

English 101-1022 0-6 

English 211 and 212 or 202 or 252 6 

History 101-102 2 0-6 

Social Science (may be taken in history, government, 

economics, or sociology) 6 

Natural Science 6 

Foreign Language (continuation of language 

taken in high schools) 3 6 

Philosophy 6 

Physical Education 2 

Requirements for the Following Sequences with a Major in Art : 

Art Education: Art History — Art 103, 325, 330, 349; Design — Art 
101, 224, 227, 331; Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 342, 364, 383; 
Ceramics and Sculpture — Art 239, 336; Art Education — Art 333, 354, 

a Since 128 semester hours are required to complete the work for this degree, the 
student should plan to attend one summer session. 

2 For exceptionally well qualified students, this requirement can be waived by special 
examination. 

3 If a new language is begun, 12 semester hours must be completed. 



75 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

461, 462; Health 101; Psychology 221; Education 317, 350; electives, 9 
hours; art or a related course approved by the adviser, 9 hours. 

Costume Design and Fashion Illustration: Art History — Art 103, 
325, 330, 349; Design— Art 101, 224, 227, 322, 324, 327, 359; Drawing 
and Painting— Art 241, 342, 364, 383; Home Economics 301, 504; 
Physics 209; art and related courses approved by the adviser, 12 hours; 
Art 450, 569. 

Design for Advertising: Art History — Art 103, 325, 357, 366, and 
one of the following: 329, 339, 350; Design— Art 101, 224, 227, 327, 379; 
Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 326, 342, 351, 364, 383; Business Edu- 
cation 506; Physics 209; art and related courses approved by the 
adviser, 15 hours; Art 450, 569. 

History and Interpretation of Art: Art History — Art 103, 325, 330, 
341, 349, 450, elective, 6 hours; 6 hours from the following, Art 101, 
224, 241, 239; art and related courses approved by the adviser, 12 
hours. Recommended courses in other fields: History 211, 553, 554; 
languages — Greek, Latin, German, or Romance Languages — 6 hours; 
Physics 209, 310; Sociology 328; Philosophy 322. 

Industrial Design: Art History — Art 103, 325, 330, 357; Design- 
Art 101, 224, 227, 331, 359, 375; Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 373; 
Ceramics and Sculpture — Art 239; 344; Physics 209; Mathematics 103- 
104; Business Education 506; art and related courses approved by the 
adviser, 13 hours; Art 450, 569. 

Interior Design: Art History— Art 103, 325, 330, 349, 357, 366; 
Design— Art 101, 224, 227, 332, 338, 359; Drawing and Painting— Art 
241, 373, 383; Sociology 326; art and related courses approved by the 
adviser, 18 hours; Art 450, 569. 

Painting: Art History— Art 103, 325, 330, 349; Design— Art 101, 
224; Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 326, 328, 342, 351, 360, 364, 383, 
581; Ceramics and Sculpture — Art 239, 344; art and related courses 
approved by the adviser, 14 hours; Art 450, 569. 

Textile Design: Art History— Art 103, 325, 341, 349; Design— Art 
101, 224, 227, 359; Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 326; Home Eco- 
nomics 341, 514; electives: 12 hours; Physics 209; art and related 
courses approved by the adviser, 9 hours; Art 450, 569. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR'S 
DEGREE IN MUSIC 

There are three majors leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts: 
Applied Music, Music Literature, and Music Theory. The hours required 
include : 

76 



Special Information 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN MUSIC 

Courses S.H. 

English 101-102 1 0-6 

Humanities (see page 60) 12 

History 101-1021 0-6 

Social Science (above Grade I) 6 

Foreign Language 6-18 

Natural Science and Mathematics 12-14 

Physical Education 2 

Music: 

Core 34 

Major 3-8 

Elective courses 0- 5 

Non-Music elective courses 25-27 



122 



BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

The minimum requirements for the Bachelor of Music degree vary 
from 124 to 132 semester hours. There are six majors leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Music: Music History and Literature, Applied 
Music (piano, organ, orchestral instrument), Voice, Theory and Com- 
position, Liturgical Music, and Music Education. The hours required 
include : 

Courses S.H. 

English 101-1021 0-6 

English 211 and 212 or 202, or 252 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History 101-1021 q. 6 

Physical Education 2 

Music: 

Core 30 

Major 41-62 

Elective 0-14 

Other Non-Music courses required in 

various music majors 0-18 

Non-Music elective courses in various 

music majors 9-27 



*For exceptionally well qualified students, this requirement can be waived by special 
examination. 



77 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Course Requirements in the Bachelor of Music Sequences: 

Music History and Literature: Music 101, 102, 103, 104, 141, 201, 

202, 203, 204, 301, 302, 303, 304, 331, 332, 431, 432, 447, 448; Applied 
Music, 16 hours: choir or orchestra, 4 hours; music electives, 6 hours. 

Applied Music: Music 101, 102, 103, 104, 141, 196 ab, 201, 202, 

203, 204, 301, 302, 303-304 or 461-462, 331, 332, 371, or 372, 431, 432, 
447, 473, 474; Applied Music, 28 hours; Choir or Orchestra, 4 hours, 
music electives, 14 hours. 

Voice: Music 101, 102, 103, 104, 141, 170, 171, 201, 202, 203, 204, 
301, 302, 331, 332, 371, 375, 376, 447, 448, 475, 476. Voice 24 hours, 
Piano, 4 hours; Choir, 4 hours; Madrigals, 6 hours. 

Theory and Composition: Music 101, 102, 103, 104, 141, 201, 202, 
203, 204, 205, 206, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 331, 332, 371, 372, 
401, 402, 403, 431, 432. Concentration Instrument, 16 hours; secondary 
instrument, 6 hours; Choir, Orchestra or Band, 4 hours; music electives 
3 hours. 

Music Education: Music 101, 102, 103, 104, 141, 161, 162, 163, 
164, 165, 201, 202, 203, 204, 301, 302, 303, 331, 332, 363, 364, 371 or 
372, 465, 466. Concentration instrument, 16 hours; secondary instru- 
ment, 8 hours; Choir, Orchestra or Band, 4 hours; Health 101. 

Master of Education with a major in Music Education: (see gradu- 
ate school p. 217). 

For further information about degree requirements call or write 
to the Dean of the School of Music. 

SPECIAL INFORMATION 

B.S. and B.M. Elective Hours 

Under the restrictions noted below a certain number of hours of 
elective work chosen from the departments which give courses leading 
to the Bachelor of Science degree and to the Bachelor of Music degree 
may be credited toward the Bachelor of Arts degree. The courses chosen 
must be from those approved for Bachelor of Arts credit by the Cur- 
riculum Committee and the Faculty Council. 

Also a student whose major is in one of the departments with work 
leading to the B.S. or the B.M. degree may take courses in another 
department offering work toward the B.S. degree, subject to the 
restrictions listed below. 

1. Students taking the B.A. degree are permitted to count toward 
graduation not more than 12 hours from the offerings of a single 
department whose work leads to the B.S. or the B.M. degree, not 

78 



Special Information 

more than 15 hours from the offerings of two such departments, 
and not more than 18 hours if taken in more than two of these 
departments. 

2. Students taking the B.S. degree are permitted to count toward 
graduation a maximum of 9 hours of free elective work in other 
departments whose work leads to the B.S. or the B.M. degree. 
Students taking the B.M. degree are permitted to count toward 
graduation a maximum of 9 hours of elective work in depart- 
ments whose work leads to the B.S. degree. 

3. Any course taught in a department whose work leads to the B.S. 
or the B.M. degree shall count toward the maximum number of 
B.S. or B.M. hours to be credited toward the B.A. or the B.S. or 
the B.M. degree. Required freshman and sophomore Physical 
Education courses are not included. 

These limits do not apply to the Interdepartmental Major in 
Recreation. 

The courses to be applied toward the Bachelor of Arts degree must 
be selected from the following: 

Approved Business Education courses are: Business Education 111, 
112, 213, 214, 314 1 , 321-322, 333, 423, 433, 501, 502, 506, 507, 508, 511-512, 
and 518. 

Approved Home Economics courses are: Home Economics 101, 213, 
300, 301, 302, 341, 345, 351, 353, 355, 412, 446, 504, 514, 522, 532, 536, 
562, and 592. 

Approved Music courses are: Music 101, 102, 103, 104, 141, 180, 181, 
182, 190, 191, 192, 201, 202, 203, 204, 301, 302, 331, 332, 341, 342, 368, 
375, 376, 475, 476, 542, and applied music courses to which the student 
may be admitted in accordance with the School of Music rules. 

The approved courses in the Department of Physical Education are: 
Physical Education 241, 334, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 
344, 345, 346, 354, 355, 356, 522, 523. 

Certain departmental regulations govern the choice by the individual 
student of any of the courses above. 

Associate in Applied Science in Nursing 

The Department of Nursing Education offers a two-year program 
cooperating with Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital. A six-week summer 
session in Psychiatric Nursing follows the first year of academic 
work at John Umstead Hospital at Butner, N. C. The two years of 



'For Economics majors only. 

79 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

academic work at the University are followed by a four-month practicum 
for which a salary is paid. Students are eligible to take the Registered 
Nurse Licensing Examination. Admission requirements and tuition fees 
are the same as for all students in the university. Graduation exercises 
are held upon completion of the practicum. 

Second Year 

Semester 

Courses 1st 2nd 

Sociology 211 1 3 

Psychology 224 1 3 

Nursing 201-202 9 9 

Physical Education 1 . . % % 

Elective 3 3 



First Year 








Semester 


Courses 


1st 


2nd 


English 101-102 1 .... 


3 


3 


Psychology 221 1 


3 




Chemistry 201 




3 


Biology 103-104 1 


3 


3 


Nursing 101-102 


6 


4 


Physical Education 1 . . 


% 


y 2 


Home Economics 302 1 




3 



Total sem. hrs 15 % 16 % Total sem. hrs 15 V 2 15% 

Summer School — Nursing sl50 6 cr. 

THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

An International Studies Program for Juniors and Seniors with an 
average of 2.7 or better was approved in the Fall of 1962. This program 
is directed primarily to students in the various social sciences and 
foreign language departments and is designed for those interested in 
acquiring an understanding of world affairs. 

The International Studies Program does not contemplate a separate 
department or degree but instead supplements the existing depart- 
mental major programs. Upon successful completion of the program the 
student's academic record will show under the designation for "Major" 

the following: " (major) and International Studies," 

e.g., "Economics and International Studies." In most instances the re- 
quirements of the program can be met by fulfilling departmental 
requirements plus approved electives. 

Direction of the Program 

The International Studies Program is directed by the Committee 
on International Studies whose members are drawn from the Depart- 
ments of Economics, Geography, German and Russian, History and 
Political Science, Romance Languages, and Sociology and Anthropology. 



*A student transferring to a four-year degree program in the college may use these 
courses for credit. 



80 



Special Information 

This committee, acting in conjunction with the chairman of the major 
departments concerned, advises the student participants; it also directs 
the Senior Seminar. 

Requirements of the Program 

The International Studies Program requires a student to: (1) 
meet the basic requirements of the University and major department; 
(2) take at least six courses from a selected list of courses in the De- 
partments of Economics, Geography, German and Russian, History and 
Political Science, Romance Languages, and Sociology and Anthropology. 
One of these courses must be International Politics and two of these 
courses must be taken outside the student's major department; (3) 
attend the Special Lecture Series and other events scheduled for this 
program; (4) satisfactorily complete the Senior Seminar in Interna- 
tional Studies. 

It is possible to integrate an Asian or a Latin American concentra- 
tion into the International Studies Program. More detailed information 
may be obtained from the Committee on International Studies or from 
department heads. 

ASIAN STUDIES 

Students who desire depth of understanding in Asian problems may 
take courses in the departments of Art, Geography, History and Politi- 
cal Science, and Sociology and Anthropology. Special study relative to 
Asia may also be developed in these departments in connection with 
the Honors Program. 

Recognition is given to the importance of Asia and to the necessity 
of all students understanding how Asians live, think and feel. Docu- 
mentary films, exhibitions and concerts are scheduled each year. 

For further details interested students may obtain information from 
the Committee on Asian Studies or department heads. 

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The Nations of the Americas are a family. Campus facilities, com- 
bined where possible with summer study and travel, will enable any 
individual student to develop a real feeling for the Latin American 
atmosphere. 

A program in depth consisting of courses on Latin American civiliza- 
tion, geography, history, literature and problems may be pursued by 
the interested student. Special reading courses and honor work are 
available, and a knowledge of the Spanish language is expected. The 
program will be supplemented by films, lectures, and special events. 

81 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

More detailed information may be obtained from the Committee on 
Latin American Studies or from department heads. 

HONORS WORK 

A comprehensive program of Honors Work for students of high 
promise and with very superior records was established in 1962. The 
purposes of the program are to discover gifted students and to make 
available to them as much of the benefit of a liberal education as their 
capacities and educated interests permit. Recognizing that a univer- 
sity's program as a whole reflects, perhaps necessarily, the capacities 
and interests of the average student, Honors Work seeks to provide the 
better students with additional stimulus to full growth. 

Although students who achieve the distinction of being designated 
as Honors Students will, for the most part, continue to enroll in regular 
courses with their classmates, a proportion — roughly a fourth — of their 
scholastic program will be composed of special sections and seminars 
in which only the most gifted students will participate, to give them 
the opportunities for growth provided by more demanding course work 
and more vigorous intellectual competition than is possible in the more 
conventional curriculum. 

In cooperation with the Ford Foundation's efforts to recruit the 
ablest college students for academic careers, the Honors Program also 
makes special efforts to interest Honors Students in preparing for 
graduate work with a view to earning advanced degrees after obtaining 
the Bachelor's degree, and to encourage them to consider careers in col- 
lege teaching. 

Requirements for Admission to the Program 

Only superior students may be considered as candidates for 
Honors Work. The program is under the general supervision of an 
Honors Council, composed of six members of the faculty, appointed by 
the Chancellor. The Council determines the standards of eligibility for 
participation in the plan at the freshman level and makes the program 
available to approximately the upper ten percent of an entering fresh- 
man class, as identified by scholastic aptitude tests and high school 
records. Sophomores and juniors are considered eligible if their scholastic 
average is 3.0 or above. In the case of seniors, a prerequisite for parti- 
cipation is a minimum average of 3.5 in courses in the student's major, 
above Grade I, and 3.0 in all other courses which carry credit (both 
hours and quality points) for graduation. All candidates are subject to 
approval of the Honors Council. Freshmen, sophomores, and juniors 
eligible for candidacy are notified of their status and are invited by 
the Honors Council to enter upon Honors Work. So far as possible, 

82 



Special Information 

these invitations are sent prior to registration periods, but in some 
cases, the necessity of computing scholastic averages will postpone 
these invitations until the registration period itself. 

For participation in Honors Work in the senior year, application for 
admission should be made by the student not later than May 10th of 
her junior year, by writing a letter of application to the chairman of the 
Honors Council. The student must also be recommended by three 
members of the faculty, including the head and one other member of 
the department in which Honors Work is to be undertaken. These recom- 
mendations shall be sent to the chairman of the Honors Council inde- 
pendently and shall, with the possible exception of the head of the de- 
partment, be from members of the faculty who have taught the student. 

Work of the Candidate 

The first stage of the program, in the freshman and sophomore years, 
operates within the established frame of courses, but provides unusually 
stimulating and demanding sections of the courses that most students in 
the college may be expected to take. In the freshman year honor 
candidates elect special sections, open to honor students only, in one or 
more of the standard courses required of all freshmen {e.g., English, 
history, languages, sciences). In addition, all Freshman Honors 
Candidates are obligated to attend meetings of the Freshman Honors 
Seminar, which offers no credit. The seminar will meet in independent 
groups of not more than eight students, with each group under the 
direction of a member of the Freshman Honors Seminar Faculty. There 
will be at least eight informal meetings during the academic year at 
times and places designated by the faculty member. These meetings will 
usually be held in the evening, frequently in the faculty member's home. 
In the sophomore year students again elect one or more special honors 
sections in their standard program, plus a one-credit-hour interdis- 
ciplinary seminar devoted to intensive study of a theme that cuts across 
departmental lines. Honors students are required during the freshman 
and sophomore years to take not less than one of the special sections 
available to them each semester. No upper limit in the number of 
special sections in which they may enroll is now contemplated, but it 
is proposed that careful and continuous counselling serve as a restraint 
upon "overloading." 

The second stages of the program consists of a broad six-hour 
interdisciplinary seminar to be offered in the junior year. Here the 
student will be confronted with topics relating to significant attempts 
of the human mind to understand itself and the human situation. The 
student will be required to read an impressive list of books and to at- 
tend regular lectures and discussions. At this point, the student must 
be sufficiently mature to willingly make the expenditure of time and 

83 



University op North Carolina at Greensboro 

energy and the sacrifice of lesser distractions which this opportunity 
will necessarily require. In some cases the committee will consider the 
substitution, in the second semester, of a suitable departmental course, 
to be approved by the Honors Council, in lieu of the regular Junior 
Honors Seminar's second semester. Such substitution shall be con- 
sidered only when, in the opinion of the Committee on Honors work, the 
substitute course is consistent with the general objectives and philosophy 
of the honors program. 

The final stage, undertaken in the senior year, will consist of the 
activity which has heretofore comprised the college's honor program, 
A student will spent one semester in intensive investigation of a limited 
sector of scholarship or in collecting materials and making preparation 
for an investigative or creative project, and one semester in the execution 
of that project. Students who complete the program are awarded special 
honors at graduation and enjoy the additional privilege of having their 
special honors work program permanently inscribed on their college 
transcripts. 

Honors Work in the senior year (for which the Junior Seminar shall 
be a prerequisite) shall replace six semester hours of class work, 
three each semester. One semester is to be devoted to intensive read- 
ing and research covering a broad area of the student's major, 
followed by an honors examination. The other semester is to be 
devoted to the writing of an honors essay, to a creative project, or to 
an experimental project, depending upon the nature of the student's 
material. A director will guide and assist the student in correlating the 
two phases of the honors program. Credits earned in the major field 
through honors work are included in the total hours required for major- 
ing in that field; however an honors student in the B.A. course may 
take for credit the six hours of honor work in addition to the maximum 
allowed in the major subject. The Honors candidate shall not be per- 
mitted to enroll for more than thirteen hours in addition to the honors 
work in either semester. With the permission of the head of the depart- 
ment and the instructor concerned, the student may be excused from 
any course examination in a major subject in the second semester. 

Students designated as eligible for participation in the honors 
program will elect to enter the program or not, as they choose. Pro- 
vision is to be made for ready entry into the program at the beginning 
of both the sophomore and the junior years, to permit participation by 
students whose capacities were not at first recognized by the testing 
and evaluative procedures, and to permit subsequent entry to students 
who originally declined to take part. A provision allowing entry as late 
as the beginning of the junior year permits highly qualified transfer 
students to avail themselves of this plan. It is anticipated that pro- 

84 



Special Information 

vision will also be made for easy withdrawal from the program by 
students who feel that they do not wish to continue. 

SPECIAL PROGRAM FOR ACADEMICALLY 
TALENTED FRESHMEN 

Special sections for academically talented freshmen are offered in 
chemistry, health, History, mathematics, English, Spanish, and French. 
Freshmen with excellent high school preparation in these areas who 
also show high aptitude in test scores on admissions and placement tests 
are eligible for these sections. The School of Home Economics offers a 
special section of the freshman course required of students planning 
to major in home economics. 

JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD 

A qualified sophomore in good standing and with sufficient language 
training may, if conditions permit, spend her junior year abroad under 
the auspices of an approved group, or at an acceptably accredited 
institution. The group must be recognized by the Council on Junior 
Year Aboard or the Committee on Junior Year Aboard of the Institute 
of International Education. Residence, whenever possible, is with a 
family in the host country. 

Study abroad is carefully supervised by faculty members of the 
sponsoring group, who, upon proof of satisfactory work, will recom- 
mend 30 semester hours of credit for one year of work. At times, exam- 
inations upon return may be required. 

Interested students should consult with Dr. Virginia Farinholt, Pro- 
fessor in Romance Languages, Adviser on Junior Year Abroad. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREE 

See Chapter VIII, Graduate School of the University of North Caro- 
lina. (Page 217.) 



85 



PART VI. 



Academic Regulations 



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*M V H 




VI. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

ADMINISTRATION 

THE ACADEMIC AND PERSONNEL COMMITTEE 

The Academic and Personnel Committee is composed of nine faculty- 
members with the Associate Dean as chairman. This committee has the 
responsibility of applying academic regulations as stated in the Bulletin 
and of considering requests for the waiver of these regulations in 
unusual situations. 

ACADEMIC COUNSELING 

The Associate Dean coordinates the academic counseling and advising 
services available to students. A member of the faculty serves as 
Academic Class Adviser for each of the four undergraduate classes. 
Selected members of the faculty serve as faculty advisers to small 
groups of freshmen and sophomores, and the deans of schools and heads 
of departments advise the juniors and seniors majoring in their particular 
schools and departments. Thus each student has available to him 
throughout his college course a faculty member, acquainted with his 
needs and interests, from whom he may seek assistance in academic 
matters. 

Vocational Counseling Service 

The Vocational Counselor has the responsibility to help students with 
vocational choices by means of tests and counseling. 

Reading Improvement Program 

The Reading Improvement Program is available to help the student 
improve his reading efficiency. This service is designed to help as many 
students as possible on an individual basis. Tests and an analysis of 
reading difficulties are given, followed by a series of self-directed 
assignments to improve comprehension and speed. 

REGISTRATION 

Orientation Week 

New students are required to be present for Orientation Week to aid 
them in becoming adjusted to college life as quickly as possible. The 
program of this week includes testing, preregistration counseling, special 
lectures on student traditions, library tours, social gatherings, and 
registration for fall semester. Selected student leaders and members of 
the faculty help with this program. A schedule of orientation events is 
mailed in late August to all entering students. 

89 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

REGISTRATION AND PREREGISTRATION DATES 

Registration dates are set forth in the Calendar on Page 3 of this 
bulletin. Students will be notified by campus mail the hour they should 
report to the gymnasium to begin registration. All students who register 
for classes after the regularly scheduled dates have passed will be 
charged a late registration fee of $5.00. 

On the date of preregistration indicated in the Calendar (page 3 
of this bulletin) each returning student shall present to the Registrar 
a copy of her program of study for the coming year. This program must 
have the official endorsement of the student's faculty adviser. 

COURSE LOAD 

Credits for all courses are reported in semester hours. A semester 
hour of credit is one fifty-minute period of recitation per week or its 
equivalent throughout one semester. Undergraduates normally carry 15 
or 16 semester hours per semester, and are considered full-time students 
if they are carrying 12 or more semester hours for credit. Undergradu- 
ates carrying less than 12 semester hours per semester for credit are 
considered part-time students. Students may register for two half-hour 
lessons a week in applied music (without credit) in addition to their 
regular work so long as they are doing satisfactory work in all courses. 

The maximum load for students who have a scholastic average of 
"C" in the preceding semester is 17 semester hours. A scholastic average 
of "B" in the preceding semester is required for students to register for 
18 hours. Under special circumstances students who have a scholastic 
average of "B" on a program of 15 or more semester hours for the 
preceding semester may register for a maximum of 19 hours. These 
maximum hours must constitute their complete programs except for 
required physical education courses. Students in the Honors program 
and others who have a cumulative quality point ratio of 3.0 may, in 
special circumstances, be authorized, at the discretion of The Associate 
Dean, to carry a maximum of 20 hours of course work. 

All permissions for extra hours are subject to the approval of the 
University Physician. 

No regular student may carry less than 12 hours of work except by 
permission of the Academic and Personnel Committee. 

CREDITS 

No student may receive credit in any course for which she has not 
officially registered. Students are required to register and pay all course 
fees on appointed dates. Failure to do so will result in forfeiture of 
registration and credit. 

90 



Academic Regulations 



CHANGE IN COURSE 



Changes of courses should not be made after registration except in 
unusual cases. For one week after registration a student may make 
necessary changes by presenting to the Registrar a change-of-course 
card signed by her faculty adviser and her class adviser. A student is 
not officially dropped from a course until she has followed this precedure. 

Students are not permitted to enroll in a course for credit later than 
one week after registration. 

A course dropped after four full weeks of instruction in a semester 
have elapsed shall be recorded as WF (withdrawn failing). This ruling 
may be waived by The Associate Dean, the University Physician in 
case of illness of a student, or referred to the Academic and Personnel 
Committee. See the Calendar on page 3 of this bulletin for deadline 
dates in dropping courses. 

AUDITING A COURSE 

Regular students may audit a course upon the written approval of 
the instructor and the faculty adviser, and they must register officially 
for the course. Attendance, preparation, and participation in the class- 
room discussion and laboratory exercises shall be at the discretion of 
the instructor. Auditors are not required to take examinations and tests 
and receive no credit. No student may change her registration from 
audit to credit after the date of changing courses as stated in the 
Calendar on page 3 of this bulletin. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

Students desiring to withdraw from school before the end of a 
semester must file a Permanent Withdrawal card in the office of the 
Registrar. Students living in the college residence halls obtain these 
cards from their residence halls counselors. All other students obtain 
these card from the Office of the Dean of Students. Withdrawal from 
college becomes effective only when the completed Permanent With- 
drawal card is filed in the Office of the Registrar. 

CLASSIFICATION 

At the beginning of the college year regular students working toward 
a bachelor's degree must have acquired the following minimum semester 
hours of credit (exclusive of required physical education) for the classi- 
fication indicated: seniors, 84; juniors, 51; sophomores, 24. They must 
also have removed all entrance deficiencies. 

91 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

The Academic and Personnel Committee may modify the foregoing 
regulations in the case of a meritorious student. 

Those meeting entrance requirements and taking college courses for 
credit but not with the intent of earning a degree or Commercial Cer- 
tificate are designated unclassified students. Those mature students 
who submit satisfactory records of education and experience but who 
do not wish to work for a degree because of irregularities in qualifica- 
tions or because of personal objectives are designated special students. 
Special students will not receive college credit. Further information may 
be found on page 49. 

ENTRANCE DEFICIENCIES 

Graduates of approved high schools who present the required 15 
units may be admitted to the University. To be admitted as a candidate 
for a degree, the student must meet the specific requirements established 
for that degree. If there are entrance deficiencies, they must be removed 
before the student may be classified as a sophomore. Students who are 
admitted with entrance deficiencies are urged to remove them whenever 
possible during the summer preceding enrollment and are required to 
remove them before admission to the sophomore year unless an extension 
of time is granted by the Academic and Personnel Committee. 

Every effort should be made to remove entrance deficiencies during 
the summer before entering college. Sometimes students are required 
to remove these deficiencies as a condition of admission. However, if 
students are allowed to enroll with deficiencies, these deficiencies must 
be removed before the student can be classified a sophomore. 

Deficiencies may be removed in the following ways: (1) Any de- 
ficiency may be removed by passing a proficiency examination adminis- 
tered by the University; (2) or by completing the course in an approved 
high school or through the Extension Division of the University of 
North Carolina; (3) or by completing the appropriate college level 
course in the area of deficiency. Note: A beginning foreign language 
course, when taken to remove an entrance deficiency, carries no credit 
hours or quality points toward graduation. 

COURSE WORK 

GRADES AND QUALITY POINTS 

The University uses a credit-quality point system of grading for 
undergraduates. Semester credits represent the number of course hours 
completed. Quality point ratios are determined by the semester hours 
attempted and grades earned; for each hour of A, 4 quality points; 
for each hour of B, 3; for each hour of C, 2; and each hour of D, 1; 
and for each hour of F, 0. 

92 



Academic Regulations 

The course grade is not based on the examination alone but also on 
the quality of the student's classroom work and written work through- 
out the semester. 

A — Excellent. A indicates achievement of distinction. It involves 
excellence in several if not all of the following aspects of the work: 

Completeness and accuracy of knowledge 
Intelligent use of knowledge 
Independence of work 
Originality 

B — Good. B indicates general achievement superior to the acceptable 
standard denned as C. It involves excellence in some aspects of the 
work, as indicated in the definition of A. 

C — Average. C indicates the acceptable standard for graduation from 
college. It involves such quality and quantity of work as may fairly be 
expected of a student of normal ability who gives to the course a 
reasonable amount of time, effort, and attention. Such acceptable stand- 
ard should include the following factors : 

Familiarity with the content of the course 
Familiarity with the methods of study of the course 
Full participation in the work of the class 
Ability to write about the subject in intelligible English 

D — Lowest passing grade. D indicates work which falls below the 
acceptable standard defined as C but which is of sufficient quality and 
quantity to be counted in the hours of graduation if balanced by 
superior work in other courses. 

E — Conditional. E indicates conditional failure. 

(a) How removed. An E may be removed only be re-examination. 

(b) When removed. The re-examination for the removal of an 
E on a course in the regular session must be taken before the beginning 
of the corresponding semester in which the student is in residence. For 
the removal of an E on a course taken in summer school the re-examin- 
ation must be taken in September or not later than the student's next 
semester in residence. An E on a course taken in summer school at 
another college will be considered an F unless the student has removed 
the E prior to her next registration at the University. If a senior wishes 
to remove an E received in her last semester, she must remove it by 
passing a re-examination at the next examination period, or the E 
automatically becomes an F. 

(c) Application for re-examination. Application for a re- 
examination must be made to the Registrar's Office. The final date for 

93 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

filing an application for re-examination either in September or during 
one of the regular examination periods will be found in the Calendar 
in the catalogue. When application for a re-examination has been re- 
ceived, the instructor and the department head should be informed prior 
to the examination. 

(d) Grade received after removal. An E may be replaced only 
by a D or an F. An E which has not been removed within the time 
limit specified under (b) automatically becomes an F. 

F — Failure. Indicates failure that may not be made up except by 
repeating the course. 

Inc — Incomplete. Inc. indicates that the completion of some part of 
the work for the course other than the examination has been deferred 
because of the prolonged illness of the student or because of some other 
serious circumstances beyond the control of the student. An Inc for 
prolonged illness can be handed in only with the written approval of the 
University Physician. An Inc for other cause may be handed in only 
with the written approval of the Associate Dean. Concomitantly with the 
recording of an Incomplete grade, the instructor also files with the head- 
of the department concerned the student's average grade and the specific 
work which must be accomplished before the Incomplete is removed. 

(a) How removed. An Inc may be removed by the completion 
of the deferred work. 

(b) When removed. An Inc received in a course in the regular 
session or in summer school must be removed within six weeks after 
the beginning of the student's next semester. An Inc on a course taken 
in summer school at another college will be considered an F unless the 
student has removed the Inc prior to her next registration at the 
University. 

(c) Grade received after removal. When an Inc is removed, 
it may be replaced by A, B, C, D, or F. An Inc which has not been 
removed within the time limit specified under (b) automatically becomes 
an F. 

Abs — Absent from examination. An examination may be authorized 
by the Registrar's Office only upon the written approval of the Uni- 
versity Physician or the Associate Dean. 

W — Withdrawal. W indicates either that the student withdrew from 
the course within the period permitted for withdrawal without penalty; 
or that her withdrawal after the period was for medical reasons certified 
in writing by the University Physician and that she was passing the 
course at the time of withdrawal. 

94 



Academic Regulations 

WF — Withdrawal-Failure. WF indicates that the student withdrew 
at a time when she was not passing the course or after the period for 
withdrawal without penalty. 

Aud — Audited. Aud indicates that the student registered for the 
course as an auditor and not for credit. 

A grade report of each student's work is mailed to her parent or 
guardian at the end of each semester, and a similar report is sent to 
each student at the end of the first semester. 

CONTINUING IN COLLEGE 

In addition to requirements listed elsewhere in this bulletin, a student 
who is making satisfactory progress toward a degree passes at least 
15 hours of work each semester with a quality point ratio of at 
least 2.0. 

A student who passes fewer than nine semester hours during the first 
semester enrolled may be allowed to enter a second semester on 
scholastic probation. After the first semester, a student must pass a 
least nine hours each semester to continue in college or to be readmitted. 

In addition to passing at least nine semester hours each semester, 
a student must meet the following criteria of minimum number of 
hours passed and quality point ratio to continue in college. 



To enter the 


Minimum number of 


Quality point ratio 


indicated 


semester hours 


on hours 


year 


passed 


undertaken 


Sophomore 


24 


1.3 


Junior 


51 


1.5 


Senior 


84 


1.7 


Fifth 


105 


1.9 



A student whose quality point ratio at the end of the fall semester 
is lower than that required to enter the succeeding year shall be placed 
on scholastic probation to make the required average. Each student is 
expected to be aware at all times of his academic status and to be 
responsible for knowing whether he is on scholastic probation. 

The quality point ratio is calculated by dividing the accumulated 
number of quality points earned by the accumulated number of semester 
hours undertaken within the University (not semester hours passed). 
However, if a student passes a course on which he has previously made 
"F's", no more hours of "F" than hours of credit for that course will 
be used in ascertaining the quality point ratio. Required physical edu- 
cation activity courses, courses in which credit toward the degree is 

95 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

forfeited to remove entrance deficiencies, and courses transferred from 
an institution other than the University of North Carolina, are not 
included in the quality point ratio. 

In unusual circumstances, an appeal of this regulation may be 
presented to the Academic and Personnel Committee. 

(See page 62 concerning freshman-sophomore requirements.) 

The University reserves the right to deny the enrollment of a student 
even though he has met the above minimum quality point ratios if it is 
apparent from his academic progress in required courses that he will 
not be able to meet the graduation requirements. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Every candidate for a degree must satisfy all of the specific require- 
ments of the University and of the department or school in which she is 
majoring. She must present for graduation 120 semester hours (ex- 
clusive of required physical education) and 240 quality points earned. 
If more than 120 hours are taken, a quality point ratio of at least 2.0 
must be maintained in relation to the hours undertaken. 

Note: Required physical education courses carry no quality points, 
and, therefore, will not be considered in computing averages. 

HONOR ROLL 

All students carrying 12 or more hours of course work are eligible 
for the Honor Roll. The roll is made up at the end of each semester, and 
the basis of selection for it is the quality point ratio attained in the 
semester. The Honor Roll includes the upper 8% of the freshman class, 
upper 10% of the sophomore class, and upper 12% of the junior and 
senior classes respectively. When the range of the highest 8%, 10%, or 
12% of the given class has been determined, all students in that class 
whose quality point ratio falls within that range will be placed on the 
Honor Roll even though the number is greater than the allotted per- 
centage for that class. Suitable recognition is accorded the recipients 
of this honor. 

SUMMER SESSION CREDITS 

Students who desire to apply transfer credit toward their degree 
by taking work taken in summer sessions of other colleges must have 
their summer school programs approved by their faculty advisers and 
class advisers and present a copy of their proposed program to the 
Registrar's Office in advance of registration for summer school. The 
Registrar will present to the students a copy of the program for which 

96 



Academic Regulations 

they may register. Without this statement from the Registrar, no credit 
is assured. Quality points are given on all work undertaken within the 
Consolidated University. 

Summer session students (other than those who have matriculated 
during the fall and spring semesters of the University) planning to apply 
their summer session work toward a degree must file a record of their 
entrance credits with the Registrar of the University previous to 
matriculation. Load for a six-weeks summer term is seven hours credit 
when approved by the Associate Dean. 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

The University accepts the accreditation of the North Carolina State 
Department of Education for colleges in the state. Colleges and uni- 
versities outside of North Carolina must have accreditation of the ap- 
propriate regional accrediting agency for transfer credit to be accepted. 
No credit will be allowed for work done at a non-accredited institution 
or for college work prior to High School graduation unless a validating 
examination is passed at the University in each subject for which credit 
is sought. 

The nature of the work in some courses for which a student seeks 
credit upon transfer from another college is such that it is desirable 
that the credit be validated by an examination where departments 
require transfer credits to be so validated. The examination shall be 
administered by the department or school. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION CREDITS 

No credit will be given for correspondence or extension work taken 
while a student is registered for work at this University. 

Not more than one-fourth of the requirements for a degree may be 
done by extension or correspondence work and not more than nine 
semester hours of this work may be done in any one year. 

Extension credit will be accepted from any institution from which 
residence credit is accepted provided the student is a junior or a senior 
and has a cumulative average of at least C. 

Correspondence credit will be accepted from the Extension Division 
of units of the University of North Carolina provided the student is 
a junior or a senior and has a cumulative average of at least C. 

A validating examination will be required before a freshman or 
sophomore may receive credit for a course taken by extension or 
correspondence. 

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University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

COURSE EXAMINATIONS 

Every student is required to take an examination, if one is given, 
on every course for which she is registered. No examinations may be 
given except during the regular examination periods of the year in 
September and at the end of each semester. Please see the Calendar 
on page 3 of this bulletin for the date of the September examination. 
(See exception for senior honors students page 84). 

EXAMINATIONS FOR PLACEMENT 

It is important that a student with exceptional ability be enrolled in 
courses which are of sufficient difficulty to challenge the student to 
his best performance. It is urged that these students be encouraged 
to take examinations for placement without credit in order that they 
may take advantage of opportunities for advanced courses and for 
individual research or other creative endeavor. 
Regulations 

I. Passing an examination of this type will not alter the number of 
hours required in that area or subject. 

II. Examinations for placement without credit will be administered 
by the departments or schools concerned. 

III. It is recommended that departments or schools make available to 
interested students reading lists and other source material which 
might assist the student in preparing for the examination. 

IV. Successful completion of an examination for placement at the 100 
level in the student's major field shall have the effect of increasing 
the number of hours accepted towards graduation above the 100 
level by the number of hours so waived. 

V. In all cases where requirements or prerequisites are waived, by 
placement examination or other means, this fact should be re- 
ported in writing to the Committee on Special Examinations and 
should be entered on the student's record. 



SPECIAL EXAMINATIONS FOR 
CREDIT-HOURS TOWARD GRADUATION 

In exceptional circumstances students of proven ability who have in- 
dependently pursued a systematic course of study may attempt, upon 
recommendation of the department or school concerned and endorsed 
by the Committee on Special Examinations, an examination to establish 
credit. 



98 



Academic Regulations 



Regulations 



I. Examination for credit may be given only on those courses which 
have been designated by the department or school concerned. 

II. The student must consult in advance with his adviser and with 
the head of the department or school concerned and give evidence 
of making adequate preparation for the examination, including 
any work designated by the department or school concerned. 

III. It is recommended that the department or school concerned make 
available to interested students reading lists and other source 
material to assist the student in preparation for the examination. 

IV. A fee will be charged, payable after the application has been 
approved. There will be no refund of any part of this fee regard- 
less of the outcome of the examination. 

V. Not more than 12 semester hours may be earned toward ful- 
fillment of graduation requirements by this method. Except with 
the permission of the class adviser and the approval of the 
Special Examination Committee, a student will not be allowed 
to apply for and take more than one special examination for 
credit at a regular examination period. 

VI. Credit and quality points will be granted only if the level of 
performance is C or better. Grades of D or F will not be entered 
on the student's record. 

VII. No examination for credit may be given which tests subject 
matter or techniques for which a student has received high 
school credit or in the case of a transfer student, which would 
serve to extend the number of hours allowed in transfer. 

VIII. No junior or senior may take an examination for credit in a 
freshman elective course. 

IX. Examinations for credit must be taken before the beginning of 
the last semester or before a twelve-week summer school of work 
immediately preceding completion of requirements for gradua- 
tion. Any exception to this regulation must go to the Special 
Examination Committee for special action. 

X. No examinations for credit may be taken in a course which the 
student has audited. 

All special examinations for credit hours are under the supervision 
of a Committee on Special Examinations. 

99 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

I. A committee composed of the four class advisers, the Dean of the 
Faculty, the Associate Dean and one faculty member appointed 
by the Chancellor, shall constitute the Committee on Special 
Examinations. 

II. Special examinations shall be given only during the regular exam- 
ination periods. 

III. Applications shall be made to the appropriate class adviser, to- 
gether with the written permission of the head of the department 
or school concerned, at least 30 days before the examination period. 

IV. Each examination shall be a written examination, except in cer- 
tain cases where mastery of techniques must be demonstrated 
either in combination with or in lieu of the written examination. 
The examination shall be kept on file in the office of the Dean of 
the Faculty. 

V. Each examination shall be administered by the department or 
school concerned and should be read by at least two members of 
the department. 

VI. Results of all such examinations shall be reported to the Registrar 
prior to the first day of the next registration period. 



RE-EXAMINATIONS 

An E may be removed only by passing a re-examination. See section 
on Grades and Quality points (p. 92) for procedure for arranging for 
re-examination. 

Blanks on which to apply for September re-examinations are avail- 
able at the Registrar's Office in July. In December and April the students 
must file requests for re-examinations to be given at the close of the 
first and second semesters, respectively. Consult the Calendar on page 
3 of this bulletin for the deadline dates for filing for re-examinations. 

An E grade may be removed by passing a re-examination before the 
beginning of the corresponding semester of the next year in which the 
student is in residence. If not removed, an E automatically becomes an 
F. An E grade on a course taken during summer school can only be 
removed by passing an examination in September or not later than the 
regular examination period of the next semester in which the student is 
in residence. An E or I grade on a course taken in summer session at 
another college will be considered as an F grade unless the student has 
removed such a grade period to his next registration at the University. 



100 



Academic Regulations 

CLASS ATTENDANCE REGULATIONS 

Attendance at classes, laboratory sessions, and examinations is 
expected of all students. The regulations governing class attendance are 
intended to give the student special privileges within reasonable limits 
and at the same time to enforce a minimum of necessary restrictions. 
It is the obligation of the student to attend class. 

1. Student Responsibility 

a. The student is responsible for all material covered in class. 

b. Each student must attend a quiz announced to the class at 
least one week in advance, and each student must attend 
laboratory sessions. 

c. "Make-up" work shall be permitted at the discretion of the 
instructor. 

2. Attendance Probation 

An instructor may place a student on attendance probation at 
any time that his work is endangered or when the instructor 
considers that it will be to the advantage of the student. The 
penalty shall be Attendance Probation in the course in which 
the student has been reported. Penalties for cutting class or 
laboratories while on probation will be invoked by the Academic 
and Personnel Committee. 

a. After a student has been notified of his attendance probation, 
absences shall be prohibited in that course except in the case 
of illness. 

b. Any unexcused absence from class in a course in which the 
student is on attendance probation shall make his subject 
to withdrawal from the course. 

c. When compulsory withdrawal occurs after the last day for 
dropping a course, a grade of WP shall be entered upon the 
student's academic record. 

3. Special Regulations for Freshmen and Commercial Students 

a. In a course carrying three hours credit, freshmen and Com- 
mercial students will be permitted two cuts the first semester 
and three cuts the second semester. In courses with fewer 
credit hours, only one cut is allowed. 

b. A freshman or Commercial student will be placed on attend- 
ance probation for the remainder of the semester in a course 
immediately after he has taken the number of cuts permitted 
unless given a medical excuse by the University Physician or 
excused by the Dean of Students. 

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University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

4. Holiday Regulations 

Every student must attend his last day of classes before, and 
his first day of classes after, any regularly scheduled holiday. 
Attendance probation or other penalty may be imposed by the 
Academic and Personnel Committee for violation of this regula- 
tion. 

5. Statement of Reasons for Class Absence 

If a student misses class work because of circumstances beyond 
his control, he will be given a statement to that effect by either 
the University Physician or the Dean of Students. This is for the 
information of his instructors. 

a. Any student who misses college work because of illness which 
confines him for twenty-four hours or more in the infirmary, 
hospital, or at home will be given a statement to that effect 
by the University Physician. Any student who, because of some 
emergency other than illness, misses college work will be 
given a statement to that effect by the Dean of Students. 

b. Special regulations for freshmen and Commercial students: 
For the first semester the University Physician will grant ex- 
cuses for all confining illnesses, and during the second semester 
for all confining illnesses of 24 hours or more. The Dean of 
Students may excuse freshmen and Commercials for other 
emergencies. 

6. Festival and Forum Regulations 

a. Upperclassmen may attend any forum session at their dis- 
cretion unless there is a conflict with attendance regulations. 

b. A Freshman may, with the permission of the instructor in 
a course, substitute attendance at any session of the festival 
or forum for class attendance, providing the session is at 
the same hour as the scheduled class. 

c. These statements are subject to the following interpretations 
and restrictions: 

1. These regulations do not apply to laboratory classes and 
announced quizzes as stipulated in the present Class 
Attendance Regulations. 

2. Not later than the last class meeting previous to the 
opening of the festival or forum, a freshman desiring to 
attend should present to his instructor his request to be 
excused from class. 

d. The Honor Policy shall apply to the student's attendance at 
a forum session for which she has been excused from class. 



102 



Academic Regulations 
GRADUATION 

The student will be held responsible for fulfilling all requirements 
of the degree for which he is registered. It is the student's responsibility 
to apply officially to the Registrar for his degree at the beginning of the 
term in which he expects to graduate. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Honors are awarded to seniors at commencement. For summa cum 
laude, a minimum average of 3.90 is required; for magna cum laude, 
3.60; for cum laude, 3.30. Averages are computed on the basis of those 
courses which have been undertaken for credit and which have been 
completed by the end of the first semester of the senior year. Any senior 
is eligible for honors who at the end of the first semester has completed 
at least 45 hours of work (not including hours for which credit has been 
received by proficiency examinations) in residence at the University 
and who has received not more than three semester hours of F in 
courses of Grade I and II. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

All students are expected to take their last year in residence at the 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Under certain cir- 
cumstances students who have completed their sophomore and junior 
years in residence at the University will be allowed to take a maximum 
of fifteen of their last thirty hours at another approved college, except 
in those instances where the faculty has adopted a co-operative program 
with another institution. 

Senior transfer students must complete at least thirty semester hours 
for the degree in residence regardless of the number of credits trans- 
ferred. 

The Academic and Personnel Committee shall have jurisdiction over 
exceptional cases concerning residence requirements. 

TIME REQUIREMENTS 

A student who does not graduate with the class with which she en- 
tered may meet general College requirements for graduation as stated 
in the Catalogue for the year she entered if she graduates within six 
years after her entrance; otherwise she will be expected to meet the 
requirements as stated in the College Catalogue in effect at the time of 
her re-entry if she returns as a full-time degree student; if she re- 
enters as a part-time degree student she will be expected to meet the 
requirements as stated in the College Catalogue in the year in which she 
begins work on her final 15 hours. 

103 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

DUAL REGISTRATION, UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE 

Any senior who is required to take less than twelve semester hours 
of work in his last semester of residence to fulfill all requirements for 
the bachelor's degree, may register for graduate courses for graduate 
credit provided approval is granted by the Dean of the Graduate School, 
the student's major adviser, and the Senior Class adviser. The total 
credit to be obtained in this way shall not exceed twelve hours including 
undergraduate credit. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR A SECOND BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 

A graduate of the University in one curriculum may receive a 
baccalaureate degree in a different curriculum by fulfilling the following 
conditions: 

1. Meet all the requirements for the second degree. 

2. Complete a minimum of 30 hours in residence beyond require- 
ments for the first degree 

3. The same degree may not be awarded twice. 



TRANSCRIPT OF RECORD 

Only one complete transcript for each student registered will be 
furnished without charge. In the case of seniors applying for teaching 
certificates in North Carolina, one additional transcript is furnished 
without charge. Further copies will be supplied only on receipt of a fee 
of one dollar ($1.00). 



104 



PART VII. 



Courses of Instruction 







,- 



*lf*^ ;y >: '-' ; r:l"-ki rf 



WMm:^m:: 



VII. COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

First semester courses are usually given odd numbers. Second semes- 
ter courses are usually given even numbers. Courses which deviate from 
this arrangement will carry notation to the effect in their description. 

An r after a course number indicates that the course may be given 
either semester. 

An s before a course number indicates that the course is given only 
during the summer. 

A semester hour credit corresponds, unless otherwise stated, to one 
50-minute class period per week through one semester. 

A hyphen (-) between course numbers indicates that no credit will 
be given for either course until both are successfully completed. 

A comma (,) between course numbers indicates that independent 
credit is granted for the work of one semester. 

The first of the figures enclosed in one or more parentheses immedi- 
ately following the course title indicates the number of semester hours 
credit given for the course; the second and third figures indicate the 
number of lecture and laboratory hours (or studio) normally scheduled 
each week for one semester in the course. For example, (3:2:3) means 
that the course carries three semester hours credit, and meets two lec- 
ture hours and three laboratory hours each week. Graduate and certain 
other courses may have only one figure enclosed in parentheses; for 
such courses this figure indicates the number of semester hours credit 
given. Unless three figures appear in the parentheses, there are no 
laboratory or studio hour requirements. 

The notation Pr. appearing in the course description is an abbrevia- 
tion for the word prerequisite. 

The s following the fee charged for the course denotes that the fee 
quoted is for one semester only. 

Courses of Grade I are numbered 100-199 and are primarily for 
freshmen and sophomores; those of Grade II, 200-299, primarily for 
sophomores; those of Grade III, 300-399, primarily for juniors and 
seniors. Grades IV, 400-499, indicates courses open to seniors. Grade 
V, 500-599, includes courses open to advanced undergraduates and grad- 
uate students. Courses numbered 600 and above are open only to gradu- 
ate students. 

It is a requirement of the University that department heads obtain 
the special approval of the Chancellor to offer regularly scheduled 

107 



ART 

undergraduate classes for which fewer than five students enroll, or 
graduate classes for which fewer than five students enroll. If en- 
rollment does not justify continuation of a class, it may be withdrawn. 



DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Professors Carpenter (Head of the Department), 
Sedgwick, Thrush; Associate Professors Hardin, Partin; 
Assistant Professors Barksdale, Kehoe; Instructor Smith; 
Curator-Instructor Tucker ; Lecturers Loewenstein, Vevers ; 
Part-time Instructor Zenke; Assistant to the Curator Pol- 
lard; Graduate Assistants Bennett, Lackey, Mills, Wu. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Design 
lOlr. Design (3:1:6). Basic course in the fundamentals of design. 
224. Color (3:1:6). A continuation of 101 with emphasis on color. 
Required of all art majors. Pr. 101. 

227. Lettering (3:1:6). A study of letter forms and their application 
in layout. 

322, 324. Costume Design and Fashion Illustration (3:1:6), (3:1:6). A 
basic study of creative design in costume and illustration. Pr. 101, 
224, 241. 

323. Interior Design (3:1:6). Creative work in interior design. Pr. 101, 
103, 224, 241. 

327. Design for Advertising and Display (3:1:6). A course for students 
interested in advertising art. Pr. 101, 103, 224, 227. 

331, 375. Three Dimensional Design (3:1:6), (3:1:6). Problems using a 
variety of materials executed with emphasis on design and suitability 
for mass production. Pr. 101, 103, 224, 241. 

332. Architectural Design (3:1:6). Work in architectural design. Pr. 
101, 103, 224, 241. 

336r. Introduction to Crafts (3:1:6). Problems using a variety of ma- 
terials including wood, clay, metal, and various textile processes. 

338. Perspective and Architectural Rendering (3:1:6). Various media 
and instruments are used to develop skill and knowledge necessary for 
making pictorial representations and perspective renderings. Pr. 101, 
103, 241, 373. 

108 



ART 

359. Textile Design (3:1:6). Emphasis on structural design in weaving. 
Pr. Art 101, 103, 224. 

361. Printing of Textiles (3:1:6). A course of advanced practice and 
execution of original designs for printed textiles. Pr. 101, 224, 241, 
331, 359. 

362. Weaving of Textiles (3:1:6). Application of the materials and 
techniques of weaving. Pr. Art 101, 224, 241, 331, 359. 

379. Art of the Book (3:1:6). A course for students interested in book 
illustration. Pr. 101, 103, 224, 241. 

450. Co-ordinating Course (3:2:2). The purpose is to co-ordinate the 
previous course work of the student in the field of art. Pr., senior 
standing. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:1:6)-(3:1:6). 

Drawing and Painting 

241. Drawing (3:1:6). Basic course in the fundamentals of drawing and 
composition. Required of all art majors. 

326. Woodcut and Wood Engraving (3:1:6). The development of cre- 
ative ability and technical skill in this graphic medium. Pr. 101, 103, 
224, 241. 

328. Etching (3:1:6). Technical processes of etching, drypoint, aquatint, 
soft ground, etc. Pr. 101, 103, 224, 241. 

342, 360, 383. Painting (3:1:6), (3:1:6), (3:1:6). Experimental studies 
in the techniques of painting. Pr. 101, 103, 224, 241. 

351. Lithography (3:1:6). Composition in black and white, using the 
lithograph stone as a medium of expression. Pr. 101, 103, 241. 

364. Figure Drawing and Painting (3:1:6). This course is devoted to 
figure drawing in black and white. Pr. 101, 241, 342. 

373. Mechanical Drawing (3:1:6). To equip the student to produce and 
read working drawings and plans. Pr. 101, 103, 241. 

History and Interpretation of Art 

103r. Introduction to Art (3:3). Intensive analysis of selected monu- 
ments and artists. 

325. Modern Art (3:3). The development of the major artists and move- 
ments of the 19th and 20th century, with emphasis on painting. 

109 



ART 

329. Primitive Art (1:1). Examples of the arts of prehistoric and 
primitive cultures. Pr., junior standing. 

330. Ancient Art (3:3). Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Etruscan, and 
Roman architecture, sculpture, and painting. Pr. Art. 103. 

334. Arts of East Asia (3:3). The development of architecture, sculp- 
ture, painting, and minor arts in India, China, and Japan. Pr., junior 
or senior standing. 

339. American Art (1:1). The major styles and artists of North 
America from Colonial times to the present. 

341. Arts of the Middle Ages (3:3). Early Christian, Byzantine, Roman- 
esque, and Gothic Art. Pr. Art 103. 

349. Renaissance and Baroque (3:3). Development of architecture, 
sculpture, and painting of the 15th through 18th century. Pr. Art 103. 

350. Renaissance Art (1:1). Selected types of Renaissance sculpture and 
painting. 

357. History of Architecture (3:3). A study of the architectural forms 
and the chief historic styles. 

366. History of Furniture (2:2). Period styles of furniture and interior 
design and the relation of these to the life of the time. 

Ceramics and Sculpture 

239. Modeling (3:1:6). A general course in the preparation and design- 
ing and modeling in clay. 

344. Sculpture (3:1:6). Study of the sculptural and plastic problems 
encountered in various sculptural media. Pr. 101, 103, 239. 

Arr Education 

333. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in the Elementary School 

(3:2:2). A study of the aims and the philosophy of art education in the 
elementary school. Pr. 101. (Count as Art credit) 

354. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in the Secondary School 

(3:2:2). The aims of art in the public school, the curricula of the crea- 
tive program in schools for kindergarten through high school, and the 
selection, preparation, and use of teaching materials. Pr. 18 sem. hrs. 
of art. (Count as Art credit) 

461r, 462r. Student Teaching (3:1:4), (3:1:4). Supervised student 
teaching at the elementary and secondary school level. Pr., senior stand- 
ing, Education 350, Art 354. Certificate requirement for art education 
majors. $10 fee. (Count as Education credit) 

no 



ART 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

521. Serigraphy (3:1:6). Creative work in silk screen painting. Pr. ad- 
vanced undergraduate or graduate standing. 

569r. Studio Problems (3:3). Special problems adjusted to the needs 
and interests of the individual students. Pr., senior or graduate standing. 

581. Painting (4:1:8). Theories, methods, and techniques characteristic 
of recent trends in painting. Pr., senior or graduate standing. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

A graduate major in Painting and Graphic Arts is offered within 
the Department of Art as a part of the degree program leading to the 
Master of Fine Arts. (See p. 206). Graduate courses sufficient to 
constitute a minor in Painting and Graphic Arts or Art History are 
also available. 

603. Motion and Art (3:3). An attempt to integrate sensorial and in- 
tellectual experience with emphasis on vision and the visual qualities of 
art. Pr., graduate standing. 

626. Woodcut and Wood Engraving (3:1:6). Printing in black and white, 
and color. Pr., graduate standing. 

628. Etching (3:1:6). Experimentation with processes of etching, dry- 
point, aquatint, soft ground, etc. Pr., graduate standing. 

631. Design (3:1:6). Two and three dimensional design, emphasizing 
plastic qualities. Pr., graduate standing. 

642, 660, 664. Drawing and Painting (3:1:6), (3:1:6), (3:1:6). Creative 
work in drawing and painting. Pr., graduate standing. 

651. Lithography (3:1:6). A study of the use of the lithograph stone as 
an art medium. Pr., graduate standing. 

654. Art Education (3:3). Selected problems of curricula, administra- 
tion, method, and general education. Pr., graduate standing. 

687, 688. Painting Research Seminar (3:3), (3:3). Research and study 
on selected painting problems. Pr., graduate standing. 
694. Thesis (2 to 6). 

Minor Program may be selected from this group : 

634. Painting in East Asia (3:3). A study of the development of 
painting in East Asia. Pr., graduate standing. 

in 



BIOLOGY 

649. Italian Renaissance Painting (3:3). The development of painting 
in Italy from 1300 to 1600. Pr., graduate standing. 

650. Northern Renaissance Painting (3:3). The development of paint- 
ing in the northern European countries from 1350 to 1700. Pr., gradu- 
ate standing. 

661, 662. Modern Painting (3:3), (3:3). Important art movements and 
theories will be studied. Pr., graduate standing. 

690r. Experimentation and Analysis — Painting and the Graphic Arts 

(3:1:6). This course is designed to provide an understanding of painting 
as a creative activity. Not open to painting majors. Pr., graduate 
standing. 

Tools of Research and Composition — Painting (3:3). See Philosophy 
690 — Aesthetics. Required of all graduate majors in painting. 

Note: The graduate course in Philosophy of Education (Education 696) 
may be taken as a part of the minor in painting. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Professor Eberhart (Head of the Department), Wilson; 
Associate Professors Anderton, Berkeley, Dawley, Gang- 
stad, Harpster, Roeder, Rogers ; Assistant Professors Lutz, 
Morrison, Sands; Instructor Tontz; Lecturers Lund, 
Weisner. 

The department permits those students who can demonstrate a 
mastery of the material covered by its General Biology course to regis- 
ter for advanced courses. It also encourages students who demonstrate 
superior ability to undertake special problems, assistantships and 
Honors Work. These students are also advised to apply for admission 
to the Summer Undergraduate Research Programs sponsored by the 
National Science Foundation, and to present papers before the Collegi- 
ate Academy of the North Carolina Academy of Science. 

101-102. General Biology (3:2:3)-(3:2:3). Selected plants and animals 
are studied to emphasize basic biological principles. 

103-104. General Biology, Microbiology, Anatomy and Physiology 

(3:2:3)-(3:2:3). Biological principles relating to the growth, develop- 
ment, structure and behavior of the human body and its parasites with 
particular reference to nursing practice. Restricted to students in Nurs- 
ing Education. 

112 



BIOLOGY 

1 121r. Floriculture (3:3). The practical aspects of plant anatomy and 
physiology are applied, to the growth and care of domestic plants, in- 
cluding propagation methods, soil requirements and the control of plant 
diseases. The basic principles of landscape and floral design are em- 
phasized with demonstrations and field trips. 

222r. Plant Morphology (3:2:3). Selected types of Thallophytes, Bry- 
ophytes and Tracheophytes. 

224r. Plant Physiology (3:2:3). A study of the physiological processes 
involved in plant growth and behavior including the effect of such en- 
vironmental factors as climate and soil. Pr. 101-102 or 222. 

241r. Invertebrate Zoology (3:2:3). A survey of invertebrate zoology 
with emphasis on representative types. Pr. 101-102. 

251. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates (4:2:6). Comparative study 
of anatomy and evolution of vertebrates with dissection of representa- 
tive types. Pr. 101-102. 

271. Mammalian Anatomy (3:2:3). Human anatomy with study of 
skeletons, models, and anatomical preparations and the dissection of the 
cat. Pr. 101-102. 

277r. Vertebrate Physiology (3:2:3). A study of human physiology with 
emphasis on homeostatic mechanisms. Pr. 101-102. 

2 326. Introductory Course in Biochemistry (3:2:3). A survey of general 
biochemistry, emphasizing basic biochemicals and metabolic systems. 
Pr. Chem. 225 or 231-332. 

1 333r. Natural Science (3:2:3). A general course to cultivate interest 
and understanding of the natural environment with field study of 
natural sites. 

3 535-536. Biochemistry (4:3:3) -(4:3:3). Organic chemistry of major 
biochemical groups, followed by study of enzymes, vitamins, and hor- 
mones, metabolic systems, energy transfer and bio-oxidation. Pr. Chem. 
231-332, 322. 

372. Histology and Microtechnique (3:1:6). Histological study and 
preparation of animal cells, tissues and organs. Pr. 271, 351. 

378. Physiology of Activity (3:2:3). Mechanisms involved in the ad- 
justments of the human body to physical activity. Pr. 271, 277 and 
Chem. 101-102 or 103-104. 



lr This course cannot be used to fulfill the science requirements for graduation. 

2 Same as Chemistry 326. 

3 Same as Chemistry 535-536. "Major students in the respective departments of chem- 
istry or biology who take either of the biochemistry courses shall count them in their 
own major department, subject to all of the usual restrictions applying to courses in 
the major sequence." 



113 



BIOLOGY 

383. Introduction to Clinical Pathology (3:2:6). The course introduces 
the student to a career in Medical Technology. Stress is placed upon the 
reasons for doing clinical tests and only to a lesser extent on actual 
performance of tests. The subject matter includes the relationship of the 
laboratory to medical practice, the causes of disease, and the effects of 
disease, both structural and physiological. Practical procedures are 
correlated with the underlying principles of biology and chemistry. 

499r. Biological Problems (3 or more). Individual studies in Biological 
Research. Laboratory work and readings of the student will be guided 
by regular conferences with the instructor in charge. Times by arrange- 
ment. The problem will be planned with the Director of Undergraduate 
Biology Research during the fall semester. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

524. Local Flora (3:2:3). Classification and identification of flowering 
plants with field work. Pr. 101-102 or 222. 

525r. Plant Histology and Anatomy (3:2:3). Preparation of plant ma- 
terials for microscopic study and the origin, differentiation and organi- 
zation of plant tissues. Pr. 222-224 

527. Terrestrial Ecology (3:2:3). Relationship of plants to their en- 
vironment with emphasis on plant associations and distributions. Pr. 
101-102 and three additional semester hours of Biology. 

549. Co-ordinating Course: Problems in Biology (3:3). Current prob- 
lems in the biological sciences. The student is expected to make 
individual contributions in the form of independent reading, bibliographic 
work and simple laboratory experiments. Required of all senior biology 
majors. 

554. Experimental Embryology (4:2:6). Experimental and classical em- 
bryology are combined in this course. Experiments on normal and ab- 
normal fertilization, cleavage, and gastrulation are conducted on living 
eggs from the sea urchin, frog, and chick. Selected systems are studied 
in the organogenesis of the frog, chick, and pig. The course includes a 
seminar on embryonic induction, differentiation, regeneration, and wound 
healing. 

570. Natural History of Vertebrates (3:2:3). Classification, identifica- 
tion and life histories of all classes of vertebrates, with field work. 
Pr. 101-102. 

577. Physiology of Vertebrates (3:2:3). The function and control of 
mechanisms of vertebrate animals, with basic laboratory techniques in 
physiology. (Not open to those who have taken 277.) 

114 



BIOLOGY 

578. Cellular Physiology (3:2:3). The fundamental activities of cells 
with respect to nutrition, response, growth and reproduction; consider- 
ing animal cells, plant cells and microorganisms. 

581. General Bacteriology (3:2:6). The fundamentals of microbiology, 
emphasizing the role of microorganisms in everyday life. Pr. 101-102, 
Chem. 101-102 or 103-104. 

582. Pathogenic Bacteriology (3:2:6). Relation of pathogenic micro- 
organisms to disease in man. Pr. 381. 

584. Immunology (3:2:6). The principles of immunology and serology 
with laboratory applications. Pr. 381. 

592. Genetics (3:3). Theory of organic evolution, Mendelism and modern 
trends in genetics. Pr. 9 hours of biology or permission of the instructor. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

601 A 1 . Biology for the Secondary School Teacher (2). A review of 
fundamental biological facts and principles with particular reference 
to those concepts included in the North Carolina Handbook for Ele- 
mentary and Secondary Schools as applied to the teaching of Biology. 

601B 1 . Recent Developments in the Biological Sciences (2). A study of 
recent advances in biology and their application in the teaching of high 
school biology students. 

603ab!. Selected Topics in Biology (3), (3). A study of fundamental 
concepts in biology as these are related to other sciences included in 
general science: metabolism, photosynthesis, ecology, evolution, repro- 
duction, inheritance. Thirty lecture and twelve laboratory hours. Pre- 
requisites: graduate standing. 

607 A 1 . Cellular Physiology for the Secondary School Teacher (2). A 
study of the biological cell as the basic unit of life. Cellular structure 
and function and the dynamic features of growth and differentiation 
at the cellular level. 

607B 1 . Genetics and Inheritance for the Secondary School Teacher (2). 
A study of Molecular and Mendelian Genetics with emphasis on organic 
evolution. 

691. Advanced Problems in Biology. Individually supervised study in 
any field of biology. Hours per week and credit to be arranged. 

(a) Biochemistry-physiology, (b) developmental biology, (c) mor- 
phology (plants or animals), (d) genetics evolution, (e) ecology-animal 
behavior. 



x Not applicable to M.A. degree in Biology. 



115 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 

699. Research in Biology. Independent research under the guidance of 
a faculty member designated by the Head of the Department after con- 
sultation with the student. This will include the preparation of a 
master's thesis. Hours per week and credit to be arranged. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS EDUCATION AND 
SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Littlejohn (Head of the Department) ; Asso- 
ciate Professors Hardaway, Whitlock, Harrell; Assistant 
Professors Sievers, Smith; Instructors Jones, Darnell, 
Grill, Worsley. 

The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Secretarial Administration integrates a broad general education with 
special education for students who are planning to enter business or 
business teaching. Five areas of concentration are provided: (1) a 
business teacher sequence, leading to basic business teaching positions 
in secondary schools, junior colleges and business colleges — meeting the 
requirements for the North Carolina Basic Business Teacher Certificate; 
(2) a business teacher sequence, leading to clerical, stenographic, and 
basic business teaching positions in secondary schools, junior colleges 
and business colleges — meeting the requirements for the North Carolina 
Comprehensive Business Teacher Certificate; (3) a distributive education 
sequence, leading to store service positions and distributive education 
positions in secondary schools — meeting the requirements for the North 
Carolina Distributive Education Teacher Certificate; (4) a merchandising 
sequence, leading to store service positions; (5) a secretarial sequence, 
leading to secretarial and related positions. 

The requirements in the freshman and sophomore years comprise a 
basic liberal arts program. Basic courses in economics which provide a 
fundamental understanding of the operation of business and economic 
organization are prerequisite for the more specialized courses offered in 
this department. 

For the requirements for graduation with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Secretarial Administration, see page 73. 

Graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Science and Master 
of Education with a major in business education is offered through 
courses in both the regular sessions and the summer sessions at the 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

See also Chapter VIII, Graduate School. 

116 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

111. Fundamentals of Typewriting (1:3). Development of basic type- 
writing skills as a vehicle of communications. 

112. Intermediate Typewriting (1:3). Further emphasis on basic type- 
writing skills with their application to business letter writing, tabulating, 
manuscript typewriting, and an introduction of office production and 
office production measurement. Pr. Ill or the approved equivalent. 

213. Problems in Typewriting (1:3). Problems involving statistical re- 
ports, rough drafts, financial reports, legal forms, manuscripts, dupli- 
cated reports, and other selected forms and reports. Continued emphasis 
on letter production problems. Pr. 112 or the approved equivalent. 

214. Advanced Problems in Typewriting (1:3). Development of sus- 
tained production on advanced simulated typewriting problems com- 
monly met in business offices. Measurement by office standards. Pr. 213 
or the approved equivalent. 

314. Business Data (3:3). Uses, sources, correct interpretation, and 
common fallacies of numerical data in business and economics. Principles 
and practice in collecting, presenting, analyzing, and interpreting ele- 
mentary statistical material. 

321-322. Shorthand and Transcription (3:5) -(3:5). Mastery of Gregg 
Shorthand. Application of the skills of shorthand, typewriting, and 
English in transcriptions. Pr. 112 or the approved equivalent. 

333. Office Machines (3:1:4). Basic course in the operation, use and 
care of office machines and equipment, including filing; offset and fluid 
process duplicators; dictation and transcribing machines; adding, cal- 
culating, posting machines; and the Vari-Typer. Pr. 112, or the approved 
equivalent. 

338. Institution Accounting (3:2:2). Principles and techniques of ac- 
counting applied to a tea room, a school cafeteria, the nutrition depart- 
ment of a hospital, a college residence hall, a city club, and similar 
organizations. 

351. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in Bookkeeping, Basic Business 
and Typewriting (3:3). Analysis and evaluation of objectives, materials, 
and methods for teaching bookkeeping, basic business, and typewriting 
in the secondary school. Observation of demonstration teaching. 

352. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in (a) Shorthand, or (b) Office 
Practice, or (c) Distributive Education (1:1). Analysis and evaluation of 
objectives, materials, and methods for teaching shorthand, or office 
practice, or distributive education in the secondary school. Observation 
of demonstration teaching. 

117 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 

423. Secretarial Problems and Procedures (3:2:2). Review of Gregg 
Shorthand. Emphasis on transcription proficiency. Introduction to routine 
secretarial procedures. Minimum amount of work experience required 
preceding or during this semester. Pr. 321-322 or the approved equivalent. 

424. Administrative Secretarial Problems and Procedures (3:2:2). 
Retention of recording and transcription speed attained in 423. Emphasis 
on specialized business vocabularies. Application of knowledges and 
skills to office practices and procedures specific to the administrative 
secretary. Pr. 423 and 333 or the approved equivalent. 

433. Calculating Machines (2:0:6). Development of a proficiency in the 
use of adding, calculating, and posting machines. 

465. Supervised Teaching (6). Observation, teaching under supervision, 
and participation in the total school and related community activities of 
a teacher. Full-time responsibility for one-half semester or equivalent. 
Fee $20. 

468. Principles of Business Education (3:3). Aims and objectives of 
business education. Scope and functions of the agencies and institutions 
for business education. Evaluation of various business curricula in re- 
lation to modern educational philosophy, trends in business education, 
and findings of research. 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

501. Advanced Accounting (3:3). Study of financial statements and the 
items that comprise them, with major attention to theory and procedures 
involved in valuation, reporting, and interpreting working capital items. 
Pr. Econ. 233-234 or the approved equivalent. 

502. Advanced Accounting (3:3). A continuation of the study of 
financial statements and the items which comprise them, with major 
attention to procedures involved in valuation, reporting, and interpreting 
noncurrent items. Special attention given to accounting for stockholders' 
equity, to ratios and measurements, and to error analysis and corrections. 
Pr. Econ 233-234 or the approved equivalent. 

504. Office Management (3:3). Principles and successful practices in the 
management of the flow of information within an enterprise. The basic 
management functions of planning, controlling, organizing, and actuating 
are applied to physical facilities, procedures, and personnel. 

506. Introduction to Retailing (3:3). Introductory course in the funda- 
mentals of retail store organization, management, and merchandising. 



118 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 

507. Merchandise Analysis (3:3). Study of selected items of non-textile 
merchandise. Special problems involved in merchandising. Pr. 506 or 
consent of instructor. 

508. Operating Problems in Retailing (3:3). Operating problems and 
techniques of the modern store and relationship of the operating divisions 
to the merchandising functions of buying and selling. Pr. 506 or consent 
of instructor. 

509. Business Communications (3:3). Analysis, composition, and dicta- 
tion of effective business letters and reports. Communication as a 
management function within the business enterprise and with the public. 

511. Income Tax Accounting (3:3). Study and interpretation of the tax 
structure and tax principles. Analysis and interpretation of accounting 
principles and procedures related to tax accounting. Application of tax 
and accounting principles to specific problems. 

512. Cost Accounting (3:3). Cost accounting principles, systems, pro- 
cedures, and practices. Cost principles, cost determination procedures, 
cost control, and cost analysis. Cost and profit analysis for decision- 
making purposes. 

518. Advanced Merchandising and Sales Promotion (3:3). Fundamentals 
and techniques of merchandise pricing. Theory and techniques of 
planning and implementing sales promotion programs. Pr. 506 or consent 
of instructor. 

550. Directed Business Practice (1-4:1:3-12). Planned work experience 
approved in advance by instructor. Coordinating conferences and sem- 
inars. Pr. advanced undergraduate or graduate standing in business 
education, and consent of instructor. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

The graduate program in business education for the Graduate School 
of the University of North Carolina is a function of the University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro. Students are encouraged to complete 
some graduate study at the Chapel Hill division. The program is designed 
to prepare master teachers and supervisors of business subjects, in- 
cluding teachers and heads of departments in secondary schools, junior 
colleges, and teacher-education institutions. A special leaflet outlining 
the requirements for the degrees of Master of Science and Master of 
Education may be obtained from the head of the department on request. 

605. Business Statistics (2 or 3). A study of the steps in the statistical 
approach to problems in business and economics; statistical populations; 
sample selection; probability theory; data flow. Emphasis on the signif- 
icance, usefulness, and limitations of statistical methods in dealing with 
management problems. 

119 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 

610. Research in Business Education (2 or 3). Methods and techniques 
in business education research. Bibliography, problem selection and 
definition. Preparation of overview of research project. 

611. Review of Research (2-4). Intensive study, analysis, and evaluation 
of research in business education and related fields. 

612. Field Study (2-4). Opportunity for individual investigation, con- 
ducted in absentia with periodic conferences and reports required. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to study their individual problems with approved 
research technique. 

613. Independent Study in Business Education (1-3). Intensive study 
on some phase of business or business education of special interest to 
the student. Regular conferences with the instructor. Pr. Demonstrated 
capacity for independent work and consent of the instructor. 

614. Tests and Measurements in Business Education (2). A study of 
the types, functions, construction, evaluation, administration, and 
scoring of tests in business courses. Analysis and interpretation of test 
results. 

615. 616. Seminar in Teaching (1:1), (1:1). Critical examination and 
evaluation of current research in teaching procedures. Credit for two 
semesters may be allowed in this course. 

620. Principles and Problems in Business Education (2). Problems and 
issues in business education, including philosophy, functions, and re- 
lationships. 

629a. Curriculum Problems in Business Education (2). An evaluation 
of present curriculum practices and trends in terms of the functions of 
education and business education. 

629b. Course-Making in Technical Business Education (1 or 2). The 

statement of objectives, selection of appropriate teaching materials, 
learning exercises, and recommended teaching procedures in the courses 
which have as their primary purpose technical skill development and 
job training for the office occupants. The curriculum workshop technique 
is followed with an opportunity to work on individual problems. 

629c. Course-Making in Basic Business Education (1 or 2). Consider- 
ation of the scope, objectives, teaching materials, and teaching pro- 
cedures in (1) the courses which have for their primary purpose the 
development of economic intelligence of all students, and (2) the courses 
which have for their primary purpose the development of an under- 
standing of business and job intelligence essential for success in business 
occupation. The curriculum workshop technique is followed, with an 
opportunity to work on individual problems. 

120 



CHEMISTRY 

631. Improving Instruction in Bookkeeping (2). Recommended materials 
and procedures in teaching bookkeeping, and an analysis of standardized 
test materials. 

635. Improving Instruction in Gregg Shorthand (2). Materials and 
methods in Gregg shorthand, new classroom procedures and techniques, 
and recent research and standards of achievement. 

636. Improving Instruction in Typewriting (2). Materials and methods 
of teaching typewriting. Special attention to a study of individual 
differences. 

639. Improving Instruction in Office Practice (3:0:6). Materials and 
teaching procedures in office and clerical practice, including an acquaint- 
ance with and instructional use of office machines. $3. 00s. 

640. Retail Personnel Problems (2 or 3). Problems and practices of 
personnel administration in retail stores, including case studies of actual 
problems geared to text material. Pr. B.E. 506, or consent of instructor. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Professor Schaeffer (Head of the Department) ; Asso- 
ciate Professors Marble, Vermillion; Assistant Professors 
Bedon, Felton, Forrester. 

101-102. General Chemistry (4:3:3) -(4:3:3). Introduction to the theo- 
ries, principles and applications of various fields of chemistry. 

103-104. General Chemistry (4:3:3) -(4:3:3). A general course designed 
for those students who have had high-school chemistry. Offered for 
students who present one unit in chemistry for entrance. 

201r. Fundamental Principles of Chemistry (3:2:3). A one semester 
introduction to inorganic and organic chemistry. This course cannot be 
used to fulfill the science requirement for graduation but may be elected 
by students who have not received credit for Chemistry 101-102 or 
103-104. 

221. Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (4:2:6). A study of inorganic re- 
actions with emphasis on equilibrium principles and solution theory 
illustrated in the laboratory by the qualitative testing of the common 
cations and anions and practice in their separation and identification 
using the semimicro technique. Pr. 101-102 or 103-104. Miss Marble. 

225. Introductory Course in Organic Chemistry (3:2:3). An introduction 
to organic chemistry in preparation for Chemistry 326. Pr. 101-102 or 
103-104. Miss Felton. 

121 



CHEMISTRY 

231-332. Organic Chemistry (4:2:6) -(4:2:6). Aliphatic hydrocarbons, 
their derivatives, fats, carbohydrates, proteins, and the aromatic series 
of organic compounds. Pr. 101-102 or 103-104. Miss Schaeffer, Miss 
Vermillion. 

322. Inorganic Quantitative Analysis (4:2:6). Introduction to the theory 
and practice of volumetric and gravimetric methods of analysis. Pr. 
221. Miss Marble. 

323. Advanced Inorganic Quantitative Analysis (4:2:6). Continuation 
of Chemistry 322. Also practice in potentiometric and amperometric 
titrations, electrogravimetric, colorimetric, photometric and spectro- 
photometric methods of analysis. Pr. 322. Miss Marble. 

1 326. Introductory Course in Biochemistry (3:2:3). Offered in the De- 
partment of Biology. Chemistry of foods and nutrition, emphasizing 
basic biochemicals and metabolic systems. Pr. Chem. 225. Mr. Roeder. 

337-338. Qualitative Organic Analysis (3:1:6), (3:1:6). Characteristics 
of various classes of organic compounds with laboratory practice in 
identifying pure compounds and simple mixtures. Pr. 231-332. Miss 
Bedon. 

342. Physical Chemistry Lectures (2:2). Introduction to the principles 
and problems of physical chemistry. First semester. Pr. 322, 231-332; 
Math. 327, Physics 103-104. Miss Schaeffer. 

343. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2:0:6). To accompany Chemistry 
342. Practice in the making of fundamental physiochemical measure- 
ments, with emphasis on the mathematical treatment and interpretation 
of scientific data. Pr. 342. Miss Marble. 

344. Physical Chemistry (4:2:6). Continuation of Chemistry 342, 343 
dealing with chemical equilibrium and kinetics, electrochemistry, atomic 
structure, and colloid chemistry. Pr. 342, 343. Miss Marble. 

361. Chemical Literature (2:2). Instruction in the use of the library 
and the literature of chemistry. Library problems will be assigned. Pr. 
fourteen hours of chemistry or the consent of the instructor. Reading 
knowledge of German would be helpful. Miss Bedon. 

450. Co-ordinating Course (3:3). To co-ordinate previous course work 
of the student in the field of chemistry and to present a general survey 
of the field. Required of all students majoring in chemistry. Miss 
Schaeffer. 



493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). Staff. 



iSame as Biology 326. 

122 



CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

601a. Basic Concepts in Chemistry (2:1:2). A course designed to study 
the fundamental principles and theories in the field of chemistry with 
emphasis on modern concepts of the structure, properties and chemical 
reactions of the elements and their compounds. Miss Schaeffer. 

i^-Me. Biochemistry (4:3:3)-(4:3:3). Offered in the Department of 
Biology. Organic chemistry of major biochemical groups, followed by 
study of enzymes, vitamins, and hormones, metabolic systems, energy 
transfer and bio-oxidation. Pr. Chem. 231-332, 322. Mr. Roeder. 

601b. Selected Topics in Chemistry (2:1:2). A course designed to pre- 
sent some of the more recent developments in chemistry of particular 
interest to the teacher of high school science. Miss Schaeffer. 



DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

Associate Professor Laine (Head of the Department) ; 
Instructor Meriwether. 

COURSES IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION 
(No knowledge of Greek or Latin required) 

lllr. Mythology (3:3). Designed mainly for freshmen. The great myths 
of the world, with frequent references to the literature which they in- 
spired. The Greek, Roman and Norse mythologies are stressed. Primary 
sources only are read. Mr. Laine. 

330. Ancient Art. See Art 330. 

335, 336. Greek and Latin Literature in Translation (3:3), (3:3). The 
art of epic poetry and influence of Greek and Roman epic upon subse- 
quent literature; Homer and Vergil. Greek tragedy and Greek and Latin 
historical literature. Greek literary and religious conceptions; the ideals 
making Greek culture pre-eminent in the history of thought; the influ- 
ence of Green literature upon subsequent thought. Miss Meriwether. 
(Not offered in 1964-65.) 

397. Comparative Studies in World Epics (3:3). A course in the com- 
parative study of major world epics in translations. The following works 
will be read in whole or in part: Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid, Chanson du 
Roland, Nibelungenlied, Divine Comedy, Jerusalem Delivered, Beowulf, 
Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Joyce's Ulysses. Mr. Laine. 



iSame as Biology 535-536. "Major students in the respective departments of chemis- 
try or biology who take either of the biochemistry courses shall count them in their 
own major department, subject to all of the usual restrictions applying to courses in 
the major sequence." 



123 



CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

398. Comparative Studies in World Drama (3:3). Comparative studies 
in translations of some of the Greek, Latin, and modern plays. Repre- 
sentative plays from Aeschylus through Euripides, Seneca, Terence, 
Racine, Goethe, O'Neill, Cocteau and Anouilh. Mr. Laine. 

GREEK 

201-202. Elementary Greek (3:3) -(3:3). Greek language and cultural 
influences. Emphasis on the principles of grammar, and attention to 
the correlation of Greek grammar with the grammar of modern lan- 
guages. Recommended for students of the languages, religion, and 
medicine. Mr. Laine. 

203-204. Intermediate Greek (3:3) -(3:3). Designed to develop fluency 
in the reading of Greek and to introduce the student to a part of the 
great literature of the past. Selections from Plato, Herodotos, etc. Pr. 
201-202 or two entrance units. Mr. Laine. 

325, 326. Homer "Iliad" and "Odyssey" (3:3), (3:3). Mr. Laine. 

401, 402. Plato, Selected Works (Apology, Crito, etc.) (3:3), (3:3). 
Mr. Laine. 

403, 404. Greek Drama (3:3), (3:3). Selected works of Sophocles, 
Aeschylus, Euripides, and Aristophanes. Mr. Laine. 

450. Co-ordinating Course for Majors (3:3). Extensive reading in 
literature of the Classics selected in accordance with student needs. 
Periodic conferences, written reports, and quizzes throughout the semes- 
ter. Mr. Laine. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). Staff. 

LATIN 

101-102. Elementary Latin (3:3) -(3:3). Essentials of grammar and 
reading of selections. Designed to give fundamental knowledge of the 
Latin language, to present an introduction to the further study of 
Roman literature and civilization, and to provide for a greater under- 
standing of English. Miss Meriwether. 

103-104. Intermediate Latin (3:3)-(3:3). Review of fundamentals. Se- 
lected reading from Vergil's Aeneid, I- VI, with lectures on pertinent 
topics and emphasis upon literary appreciation. Pr. 101-102 or two or 
three entrance units. Miss Meriwether. 

201-202. Roman Comedy and Lyric (3:3) -(3:3). Study of the back- 
ground of the Roman drama and lyric; selections from the odes and 
epodes of Horace and the poetry of Catullus. Reading of selected plays 
from Plautus and Terence. Pr. 103-104 or four entrance units. Miss 
Meriwether. 

124 



COMMERCIAL 

COURSES FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS 

302. Roman Philosophical Writings (3:3). Selections from the essays 
of Cicero, De Rerum Natura of Lucretius, and the essays of Seneca. 

331. Advanced Prose Composition (3:3). Intensive review of Latin 
forms and syntax; extensive composition and translation into Latin 
from English. 

333. Advanced Vergil (3:3). A study of Vergil's Aeneid VII-XII; read- 
ings from the Eclogues and Georgics. Mr. Laine. 

342. History and Politics in the Times of Julius Caesar (3:3). A study 
of the works of Julius Caesar, Sallust's Catiline, and extensive selec- 
tions from Cicero's letters and orations. Miss Meriwether. 

402. Roman Drama (3:3). Selections from the tragedies of Seneca and 
their influence on Renaissance drama. 

450. Co-ordinating Course for Majors (3:3). Extensive readings in 
literature of the Classics selected in accordance with student needs. 
Periodic conferences, written reports, and quizzes throughout the semes- 
ter. Mr. Laine. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3). Staff. 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

Associate Professor Allen (Head of the Department), 
Assistant Professors DeVinny, Weyl; Instructors Collins, 
Pierce, Worsley. 

To be eligible for a Commercial Certificate, a student must complete 
satisfactorily the prescribed courses and meet specific skill requirements 
in typewriting, shorthand, and office machines. Grade requirements for 
certification are based on a passing grade each semester and a minimum 
grade of C the second semester in typewriting and shorthand. Certain 
credits earned by the Commercial Department students may be applied 
toward a Bachelor's degree 1 . 

First Semester Second Semester 

Courses S.H. Courses S.H. 

Commercial 11 1 Commercial 12 1 

Commercial 21 3 Commercial 22 3 

Commercial 33 3 Commercial 34 3 

Commercial 26r 3 Commercial 26r, 31r, Health, and 

Commercial 31r 2 Physical Education if not taken in 

Health 103r 2 first semester. 

Physical Education 107r V 2 



Commercial 11-12; 21, 22, 33, 34; Health 103; and Physical Education 107. 

125 



DRAMA SPEECH 

11-12. Typewriting (1:5) -(1:5). Development of basic typewriting skills 
and sustained production on various types of problems encountered in 
the business office. Students receiving a certificate must be able to type 
with a minimum rate of 60 correct words a minute on a series of five- 
minute straight copy tests with errors totaling no more than 5 per cent 
of words typed; to maintain a rate of speed, on a series of production 
tests, comparable to office requirements. Miss DeVinny and Staff. 

21. Shorthand (3:5). The fundamental principles of Gregg Shorthand. 
Pretranscription training. Miss Pierce and Staff. 

22. Dictation and Transcription (3:5:3). An intensive course in dicta- 
tion and transcription. Mailability emphasised. Requirements for cer- 
tificate: a minimum transcription rate of 22 words a minute for a given 
period on letters of medium difficulty and length, with 60 per cent of 
the letters dictated in mailable form; a series of tests dictated at 90 
words a minute for five minutes, transcribed with satisfactory accuracy. 
Miss Pierce and Staff. 

26r. Business Correspondence (3:3). A detailed study of the major 
types of business letters and practice in the composition of office cor- 
respondence. Miss Pierce. 

31r. Office Machines (2:3). Development of a working knowledge in 
the use of adding and calculating machines and a marketable skill on 
voice-writing machines, with emphasis on mailable transcripts. Miss 
DeVinny. 

33-34. Principles of Accounting (3:3), (3:3). The principles of account- 
ing theory, closing the books, and preparation of statements for service 
and merchandising firms. Second Semester: Advanced theory; analysis 
of business forms and procedures; payroll records. Mr. Allen, Mrs. 
Worsley. 

DEPARTMENT OF DRAMA AND SPEECH 1 

Associate Professors England, Middleton (Head of the 
Department) ; Assistant Professor French ; Instructors 
Perkins, Rose, Seifrit ; Teaching Assistant Hobbs. 

Drama and speech courses except 491, 493, and 494 are open to all 
students. - 

The Department of Drama and Speech offers three sequences for 
majors. The drama sequence provides a pre-professional program for 
those interested in careers in commercial or community theatre or in 



'Drama majors are advised to take 101 in the freshman year. Majors are allowed 
to take a maximum of six semester hours of speech in addition to the maximum of 
36 semester hours allowed in drama. 



126 



DRAMA SPEECH 

city and other recreation programs. Freshmen should elect 121r and 
lllr, sophomores 211r and 251 or 252. Students in this sequence are 
allowed to take a maximum of six hours of speech in addition to the 
maximum of 36 hours above grade one allowed in drama. 

The general speech sequence includes study in all areas of drama 
and speech as preparation for secondary school teaching and graduate 
education. Freshmen should elect lllr and 121r; sophomores 211 and 
230 or 231 or 252. 

The speech correction sequence provides a pre-professional program 
for those interested in being speech and hearing therapists in schools 
or clinics for which graduate professional education is not required and 
for those preparing for graduate education in the rehabilitation of 
speech and hearing. Freshmen should elect lllr and sophomores 230 
and 332. 



UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 
Drama 

121r. Drama Appreciation (3:3). An introduction to the work of selected 
major playwrights. Consideration of historical and sociological aspects 
of theatre. Illustrated lectures, demonstrations, and classroom experi- 
ments. Mr. French. 

150r. Students' Theatre (1:0:3). The departmental workshop. Open to 
any student who is interested in participating in any phase of the 
theatre's production program. May be repeated for credit. Mr. Rose. 

211. Introduction to Theatre Production (3:2:3). Designed to familiar- 
ize the student with various aspects of play production including choice 
and analysis of script, acting, directing, and techniques of production. 
Practical experience is given in the laboratory. No participation in 
University Theatre productions is required. Mr. Rose. 

250. Stage Make-Up (1:0:2). Study and practice in creating straight, 
middle-aged, old-age, and character make-ups. Drama majors should take 
this course concurrently with 251. Mr. French. (Alternate years, offered 
1964-1965). 

251, 252. Acting I, II (2:1:2), (3:1:4). Designed to train the actor to 
convey thought and emotion through the use of the body and the voice. 
Mime, oral exercises, and improvisations. In the second semester, em- 
phasis on the Stanislavsky method through the preparation of roles and 
scenes. Pr. 211 or consent of instructor. Mr. French and Mr. Middleton. 
(Alternate years, offered 1964-1965). 



127 



DRAMA SPEECH 

301. Writing for the Theatre (3:3). Exercises in dramaturgical tech- 
nique. The composition of one-act plays. Exploration and experimenta- 
tion in radio, television and film scripting. Mr. French. 

333. History of the Theatre (3:3). Intended to give the student a 
knowledge of the specific conditions under which the great plays of the 
western world have been produced. Consideration of audience, actors, 
patrons, and physical conditions, architecture, and the relation of the 
theatre to the various arts. Projection of the production of representa- 
tive plays, which the student will read. Mr. Rose. (Alternate years, 
offered 1964-1965). 

375, 376. Design and Production I, II (3:2:3), (3:2:3). The principles 
of scene, lighting and costume design for the stage. Introduction to 
technical problems of play production through assignments in the studio 
and backstage during rehearsal and performance. Pr. 211, or consent 
of the instructor. Mr. Rose. 

391. Television Production (3:2:2). A course designed to introduce 
the student to basic television techniques and to acquaint her with studio 
operations. Mr. French. (Alternate years, offered 1965-1966). 

471. Directing (3:3). The fundamental principles of directing for the 
theatre. Pr. 211, 251, 252, or consent of the instructor. Mr. Middleton. 

491. Experimentation (3:1:4) A course designed to permit the student 
to experiment in the creative process of building a dramatic role, 
directing, playwriting, stage design, or television production with an 
accompanying analysis of that process. Open only to drama majors of 
senior standing. Staff. 

Speech 

Students following recommendations of the speech faculty based 
upon the Freshman Speech Screening Test who have been placed in 
the "required" or "advised" categories should register for lllr if fresh- 
men or sophomores, or, 329r if juniors or seniors. Those placed in the 
"special" category should register for 219. 

Other students desiring to elect a course in speech should choose 
from among lllr, 230, 231, 320, 329r, 332, 341, 342. 

Other students desiring to elect a course in speech should choose 
lllr, 230, 329r, 320, 332, or 341. Those who speak English as a second 
language should take Speech 329r. 

lllr. Fundamentals of Speech (3:3). A basic introductory course to 
oral communication with emphasis on voice and speech improvement, 
reading aloud, public speaking and group discussion. Mrs. Perkins, 
Mr. Seifrit. 

128 



DRAMA SPEECH 

217. The Speaking Voice (2:2). Mechanism of the voice. The principles 
and practice of good voice and speech — clear voice quality phrasing, 
stress patterns, distinct and acceptable pronunciation. Recommended 
only for those who cannot schedule Speech lllr or 329r. May not be 
taken by those who have had Speech lllr. Miss England, Mrs. Perkins. 

219. Speech Laboratory (1:0:2). Supervised practice in continuing the 
development of good speech for those who have nasal or husky voices, 
stutters, lisps, foreign accents, or other speech problems which need 
attention beyond that possible in Speech lllr or 329r. Pr. Speech lllr 
or 329r or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Miss 
England, Mrs. Perkins. 

230. Introduction of Phonetics (3:3). A study of the science of speech 
sounds. Consideration of the voice mechanism, the phonemes of the 
English language, and the International Phonetic Alphabet. Pr. lllr 

or 329r, or consent of instructor. Mrs. Perkins, Miss England. 

231. Argumentation and Debate (3:3). A survey of reasoning patterns 
especially appropriate to the analysis of issues and arguments of current 
public interest; training in the presentation of logical and persuasive 
oral discourse. Pr. lllr, 217, 329r, or consent of instructor. Mr. Seifrit. 

320. Reading Aloud (3:3). Principles of interpretation: analysis and 
practice in the oral presentation of various forms of literature to be 
selected from narrative and dramatic prose and poetry, lyric poetry, 
old ballad, sonnet, and essay. Pr. lllr or 329r or consent of instructor. 
Miss England. 

329r. Voice and Speech Production (3:3). Physiology of the vocal and 
auditory mechanisms; phonetics; exercises designed to develop strength, 
resonance, and flexibility in voice and speech production. May not be 
taken by those who have had lllr or 217. Miss England. 

332. Introduction to Speech Correction (3:3). A study of the disorders 
of articulation, rhythm, voice, and hearing, with special emphasis on 
the functional disorder. Brief survey of organic disorders. Focus is on 
the role of therapist plays in assisting the speech handicapped and the 
assistance which the classroom teacher may provide. Pr. lllr or 329r. 
Mrs. Perkins. 

341. Public Speaking (3:3). Composition and delivery of various types 
of speeches. Analysis of speaking situations in business, professional 
and social relations. Mr. Seifrit. 

342. Group Discussion (3:3). Study and practice in the principles and 
methods of group discussion: consideration of group action, the concept 
of leadership, the nature of conflict and agreement. Pr. lllr, 217, 329r, 
or consent of instructor. Mr. Seifrit. 

129 



DRAMA SPEECH 

493-494. Honors (3:3). The honors project may be a part of the drama, 
general speech, or speech correction sequences. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

Drama 

596r. Creative Dramatics for School and Community (3:2:2). A study 
of the research and literature of creative dramatics for children ages 
five through fourteen. Practice in leading groups of children in creative 
dramatics. Exploration of it as a method of teaching other subject 
matter and its use in community recreation programs. Mr. Middleton. 

Speech 

567. Phonetics (3:3). An investigation of the phonemes of the English 
language designed for the classroom teacher who wishes to improve the 
pronunciation and articulation of her students. Detailed study of the 
voice mechanism. Practice in narrow transcription of the International 
Phonetic Alphabet. Mr. Middleton. 

568. Principles of Speech Correction (3:3). A foundation course in 
principles and procedures of speech correction for children handicapped 
by disorders of voice, rhythm, and articulation. Pr. a course in phonetics. 
Mr. Seifrit. 

569. Clinical Methods of Speech Correction (3:3). A study of methods 
used to correct speech disorders of voice, rhythm, and articulation. Par- 
ticular reference to the speech correction program in the public schools. 
Observation of methods used with selected cases in the speech labora- 
tory. Pr. a course in principles of speech correction or consent of in- 
structor. Mrs. Perkins. 

570. Audiology (3:3). An introductory course into the field of audiology. 
A study of tests and measurements of hearing and of therapy for the 
person with a hearing loss. Opportunity to become familiar with the 
operation of various machines involved in hearing testing. Pr. a course 
in principles of speech correction or consent of instructor. Mrs. Perkins. 

571. 572. Clinical Practice (3:0:6), (3:0:6). Supervised practice in 
clinical teaching of groups and individuals, application of clinical 
methods in diagnosis, and re-training of those who have speech and 
hearing disorders. Pr. 569 or consent of instructor. Mrs. Perkins. 



130 



ECONOMICS & BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

Professors Kennedy (Head of the Department), Little- 
john; Associate Professor Lindsey; Assistant Professor 
Davies; Lecturers Brashear, Warne, Webster. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1 lllr. Introduction to the Business World (3:3). An introduction to 
some of the practices and procedures of the business world with em- 
phasis upon types of business organization, personnel administration, 
marketing, finance, business law, and taxes. 

211-212. Principles of Economics (3:3) -(3:3). A study of the present- 
day economic system; demand, supply, prices, and costs; wages, interest, 
rent, and profits; national income analysis; business cycles, under- 
developed nations, and other current economic problems; a comparison 
of capitalism, fascism, socialism, and communism. 

1 233-234. Principles of Accounting (3:2:2) -(3:2:2). The typical trans- 
actions of a business firm as they pass through the books; closing the 
books and making up the statements. Business forms and practices. 

325r. General Economics (3:3). A survey of elementary economics 
especially designed for students who may want only one semester of 
work in the field. A brief treatment of the production and distribution 
of wealth in society; money and banking; business organization; labor 
economics; and other current economic problems. Not open to those 
who have had 211-212. 

327. Money and Banking (3:3). How our money and credit instruments 
are issued and secured; monetary policy and theory; the functions per- 
formed by money in our society; the operations of commercial banks 
and of the Federal Reserve System. Pr. 211-212, or 325. 

431, 432. Business Law (3:3), (3:3). The general principles of business 
law, including contracts, agency, sales, negotiable instruments, partner- 
ships, corporations, and bankruptcy. Ec. 431 is a prerequisite for 432. 

450. Economic and Business Statistics (3:3). An introduction to statis- 
tical methods and their applications in economics, sociology, business 
administration, governmental affairs, and in other social sciences. Topics 
covered will include: measure of central tendency, dispersion, and re- 
lationship; trends; index numbers; time series analysis. Emphasis will 
be placed on problem solving and laboratory. A student taking this 



'This course cannot be offered to satisfy the social science requirement for graduation. 

131 



ECONOMICS & BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

course may not receive credit for Mathematics 341 or Psychology 510. 
Same as Sociology 450. Credit may be received as either Economics or 
Sociology, but not both. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

501. Advanced Accounting (3:3). Rapid review of the accounting proc- 
esses, with particular emphasis on adjustments, working papers, finan- 
cial statements, and closing and reversing entries. An intensive study of 
accounting statements and the items that comprise them, with major 
attention to procedures involved in evaluating, reporting, and inter- 
preting working capital items and corporate capital. Pr. Ec. 233-234. 
Same as Business Education 501. 

502. Advanced Accounting (3:3). A continuation of the study of ac- 
counting statements and the items which comprise them, with major 
attention to procedures involved in recording, evaluating, reporting, 
and interpreting noncurrent items. Special attention given to ratios and 
measurements, and error analysis and corrections. Pr. Ec. 233-234. Same 
as Business Education 502. 

511. Income Tax Accounting (3:3). Comprehensive explanation and 
interpretation of the tax structure and tax principles. Analysis and 
interpretation of accounting principles and procedures related to tax 
accounting. Application of tax and accounting principles to specific 
problems. Pr. Ec. 233-234. Same as Business Education 511. 

512. Cost Accounting (3:3). Cost accounting principles, systems, pro- 
cedures, and practices. Cost principles, cost determination procedures, 
cost control, and cost analysis. Cost and profit analysis for decision 
making purposes. Pr. Ec. 233-234. Same as Business Education 511. 

515. Business Finance (3:3). The American business firm, with em- 
phasis on the corporate form: institutional importance; economic, social, 
legal, and financial aspects. Analysis of corporate capital structure and 
organization, growth, and governmental regulation. Pr. Ec. 211-212 or 
325; and 233-234. 

523. Public Finance (3:3). The chief expenditures and the main sources 
of revenue used by governments; property taxes; income and inheritance 
taxes, and various forms of sales taxes; the distribution of the tax 
burden on different classes in society; managing the federal debt. Pr. 
211-212, or 325. 

132 



ECONOMICS & BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

524. Labor Problems (3:3). The relationship between labor and em- 
ployers, and some of the more important results thereof, such as labor 
organizations, collective bargaining, and labor legislation. Pr. 211-212, 
or 325. 

528r. The Management of Personal Finances (3:3). Budgeting and 
keeping account of one's personal funds; borrowing money; buying on 
credit; making out personal income tax returns; saving and the wise 
investing of savings; insurance; and home ownership. 

530r. Principles of Marketing (3:3). A general survey of the field of 
marketing, including the functions, policies, and institutions involved in 
the marketing process. Pr. 211-212, or 325; or consent of instructor. 

534. Social Control of Business (3:3). The responsibilities of business 
to society; different methods of encouraging and compelling business to 
recognize its social responsibilities, including regulation of corporations, 
rate fixing of public utility enterprises, the conservation of natural and 
human resources, and the better ethical practices voluntarily developed 
by business itself. Pr. 211-212, or 325. 

536. Consumer Economics (3:3). The economic position of the con- 
sumer; the factors, both helpful and harmful, influencing consumer 
demand; building up the defenses of the consumer against the pressure 
of the producer and the advertiser; the various movements to aid the 
consumer, including more effective legislation, research, testing of 
products, and consumer co-operatives. 

540. Economic Development (3:3). A study of factors attending and 
determining the economic growth of nations over long periods of time. 
Application of economic concepts to problems of underdeveloped nations. 
Pr. 211-212; or 325 and consent of instructor. 

550. Comparative Economic Systems (3:3). A comparison of capital- 
ism, socialism, communism, and fascism as economic systems and as 
philosophies; the points of strength and weakness in each system. 
Pr. 211-212, or 325. 

551. Directed Studies in Economics (3). Individual studies on economic 
problems with emphasis upon areas of special interest to the student. 
Regular conferences with the instructor required. Pr. 12 S.H. of Eco- 
nomics, including 211-212, or 325; and consent of instructor. Ec. Ill 
and 233-234 not acceptable as prerequisites. 

560. International Economics (3:3). An introduction to the mechanism 
and theory of international trade. Selected current problems in inter- 
national economic and commercial policies will be evaluated. Pr. 211-212; 
or 325 and consent of instructor. 

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EDUCATION 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 



625. Problems in Applied Economics (3:3). A study of certain economic 
principles and their application to modern economic problems such as 
monopoly, economic growth, inflation and depression, money and bank- 
ing, fiscal policy, international trade, agriculture, and organized labor. 

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Kenneth E. Howe, Dean 

Professors Eugenia Hunter, Russell, Herbert Vaughan ; 
Associate Professors Franklin, Hagood, Sharma; Assistant 
Professors Aromi, Colbert, Edinger, James, Mary Hunter, 
Kreimeier, Peden; Instructors Adams, Avent, Bowles, 
Brown, Cude, Jarrett, Johnson, Jones, Manchester, 
Miller, Mitchell, Moser, Parrish, Royster, Shipton, 
Welker, Wertz; Teachers Brett, Lineberger; Teaching 
Assistant Burton. 

CURRY SCHOOL 

Located on the college campus, Curry School includes kindergarten, 
elementary and high school. It serves as a center for observation, 
demonstration, and provides some opportunity for special projects 
related to the teacher education program. The student body of Curry 
School is selective; admission is by application and particular emphasis 
is given, on the high school level, to a liberal arts program — college 
preparatory in nature. The school is a member of the Southern Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The teacher education program in elementary education is under 
the direction of the School of Education. The curriculum and sequence 
of courses are described in the requirements for the inter-departmental 
major in the Bachelor of Arts degree. Teacher education programs 
in the liberal arts fields for secondary teachers are directed by the 
department in which the student majors. The sequence of profes- 
sional education courses should be carefully noted and followed in work- 
ing out the total program in teacher education. For students preparing 
to teach in the high school, not more than 15 hours of Education may 
be credited toward the Bachelor of Arts degree. For students preparing 
to teach in the elementary grades, 21 hours of education may be credited 
towards the Bachelor of Arts degree; except that where a student offers 

134 



EDUCATION 

for graduation courses required by the North Carolina Department of 
Public Instruction specifically for certification in Special Education, 24 
hours of Education are allowed. 

CERTIFICATION 

Students who complete the total program in teacher education, and 
who meet all requirements and standards pertaining to academic and 
professional preparation as required by the respective departments, and 
who are certified by their major department as fully competent to carry 
on the work of a classroom teacher, will be recommended by the 
University for a teaching certificate. 

To be certified in North Carolina, the student must meet the specific 
state requirements for the certificate and take the National Teacher 
Examination, both Common and Optional forms. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

Student teaching is a period of guided teaching in which the student 
takes increasing responsibility for the work of the teacher in the 
classroom to which he has been assigned over a period of consecutive 
weeks. Preparation and planning for this assignment should be carefully 
worked out in advance. Prospective secondary school student teachers 
should take a lighter course load during the semester in which they 
plan to teach. They should also clear a morning or an afternoon in their 
schedule for student teaching. Students who, upon graduation, expect to 
qualify for a Class A certificate in North Carolina, are required to 
complete satisfactorily an assignment in student teaching. The student 
teaching requirements may be met by the satisfactory completion of 
Education 465 Student Teaching and Seminar (6) for teachers in 
secondary fields; for Elementary Education the student must complete 
Education 463 Student Teaching and Seminar (6). Teaching in the 
Nursery School is provided for majors in early childhood education who 
wish additional hours in student teaching beyond the requirements of 
Education 463. Credits earned in Education 464 Student Teaching and 
Seminar — Nursery School (3) will be in addition to the total 122 credits 
required for graduation. 

Admission to Student Teaching. A student planning to do student teach- 
ing in the School of Education must make application by March 1 of 
the year before the teaching is to be done. Application is made through 
the office of the Dean of the School of Education. Assignments to student 
teaching will be made after the application has been approved and the 
applicant has satisfactorily met all prerequisites. The prerequisites to 
student teaching in the School of Education are: (1) Grade point average 

135 



EDUCATION 

of 2.0 in the total college record; (2) Health clearance from the college 
physician; (3) Approval of the Speech Department; (4) Recommendation 
from the department where the student is doing his major work. 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Elementary Education 

Professional Course Program in Elementary Education 

Psychology 221* General Psychology 3 sh 

(Sophomore year) 

Education 330 Growth and Development of the Elementary 

School Child (Junior year) 3 sh 

Education 443 Curriculum and Teaching Methods in Reading 

and Language Arts 3 sh 

(Last of junior year or first of senior year) 

Block Schedule: (Senior year) 

Ed. 444 Curriculum and Teaching Methods in Social Studies, 

Arithmetic and Science 4 sh 

Ed. 446 Children's Literature 2 sh 

Ed. 463 Student Teaching and Seminar 6 sh 

Ed. 481 Social and Philosophical Aspects of Education 

in the Public School 3 sh 

24 

*May be satisfied by Psychology 211-212. 

330r. Growth and Development of the Elementary School Child (3:3:4). 
Designed to develop an understanding of the characteristics and growth 
of the elementary school child. Emphasis is given to relating the de- 
velopmental characteristics to the elementary school program. At least 
thirty hours of observation and participation in school situations 
required. Pr. Psy. 221. 

443r. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in Reading and Language 
Arts (3:3). The teaching of reading and the language arts in the 
elementary school. Pr. Ed. 330. 

444r. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in Social Studies, Arithmetic, 
and Science (4:4). Curriculum planning and the teaching of the social 
studies, arithmetic, and science in the elementary school. Pr. Ed. 330. 

446r. Children's Literature (2:2). Literature for children in the ele- 
mentary school; functions and use in the curriculum. 



136 



EDUCATION 

463r. Student Teaching and Seminar (6:1:10). Supervised student 
teaching in the elementary school under the direction of the coordinator 
of student teaching and a college faculty supervisor. Full-time teaching 
assignment for approximately one-half semester. Conferences and 
seminars required. Pr. Ed. 330. Fee $20. 

464. Student Teaching and Seminar — Nursery School (3:1:6). Intended 
for those elementary education majors who need additional student 
teaching credit to meet certification requirements in other states. Credits 
earned in this course will be in addition to the total 122 credits required 
for graduation. Pr. Ed. 330. Fee $10. 

481r. Social and Philosophical Aspects of Education in the Public School 

(3:3). Historical background, purposes, and concepts basic to public 
education; the school as an expression of social and economic life, as a 
modifying influence on this life, as an interpreter of ideologies, as an 
instrument for the transmission of culture; evolution, use, and personal 
significance to the teacher of the dominant American philosophy of 
education. Required of all teaching majors for certification. Pr. Ed. 330 
or 350. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3), (3:3). 

Secondary Education 

Professional Course Program in Secondary Education 

Psychology 221 General Phychology 3 sh 

(Sophomore year) 
Education 350 The Secondary School Pupill 3 sh 

(Junior year) 
Education 35x Curriculum and Teaching Methods 3 sh 

(Last of junior year or first of senior year) 
Education 465 Student Teaching and Seminar 6 sh 

(Senior year) 
Education 481 Social and Philosophical Aspects of 

Education in the Public School 3 sh 

(Senior year) — 

18 

350r. The Secondary School Pupil (3:3). Physical, mental, and social 
development at the secondary age levels; the goals of the American 
secondary school as related to individuals; pupil study through obser- 
vation and use of anecdotal records; practical procedures for meeting 
individual differences; tests and evaluations of teaching; extracurricular 
activities of secondary students with opportunity for observation and 
participation. Pr. Psy 221. 

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EDUCATION 

351r. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in English (3:3). Designed to 
acquaint prospective teachers with the modern concepts and practices of 
English instruction in the secondary schools; emphasis on the teaching 
of the four fundamental language arts of speaking, writing, reading, 
and listening. Required of student teachers in English. Pr. Ed. 350. 

352. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in Romance Languages (3:3). 
Effective guidance of secondary classes in their approach to objectives 
in Romance Languages; criteria for methods, devices, and materials; 
observation of teaching in the Curry School. Required of student teachers 
in Romance Languages. Pr. Ed. 350. 

353. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in Social Studies (3:3). Organi- 
zation of the social studies in the secondary schools; classroom methods, 
techniques, and activities; teaching materials; testing and evaluation. 
Required of student teachers in the social studies. Pr. Ed. 350. 

354. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in Drama and Speech (3:3). 
Instruction, organization, and content of the basic courses in drama- 
speech in the secondary school curriculum. Attention to the more im- 
portant philosophies and systems of drama-speech instruction of the 
past 50 years. Required of student teachers in drama-speech. Pr. Ed. 350. 

357. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in Mathematics (3:3). Effective 
guidance of secondary classes in their approach to objectives in mathe- 
matics; criteria for methods, devices, and materials; observation of 
teaching in the Curry School. Required of student teachers in mathe- 
matics. Pr. Ed. 350. 

359. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in Science (3:3). The mission 
of science as a high-school subject. Science in the early secondary 
schools; current trends and their causes. Principles for selection and 
organization of content; methods in laboratory and classroom; evalu- 
ation of teaching. Course presupposes a teaching knowledge of physical 
and biological sciences. Required of student teachers in science. Pr. Ed. 
350. 

461. Practicum in Teaching (3:1:5). Supervised practicum in teaching 
under the direction of a college supervisor. Observations, participation, 
and appropriate classroom teaching experience in junior or senior high 
school. Conferences required. Open to unclassified students by per- 
mission of the Dean of the School of Education. Fee $10. 

465r. Student Teaching and Seminar (6:1:10). Supervised student 
teaching in junior or senior high school under the direction of a college 
supervisor. Observation, participation, and appropriate classroom teach- 
ing experience on a half-day basis. Seminar required. Pr. Ed. 350. 
Fee $20. 

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EDUCATION 

48 lr. Social and Philosophical Aspects of Education in the Public School 

(3:3). Historical background, purposes, and concepts basic to public 
education; the school as an expression of social and economic life, as a 
modifying influence on this life, as an interpreter of ideologies, as an 
instrument for the transmission of culture; evolution, use, and personal 
significance to the teacher of the dominant American philosophy of edu- 
cation. Required of all teaching majors for certification. Pr. Ed. 330 or 
350. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

Students taking graduate courses or pursuing a graduate degree 
program should consult the bulletins and official announcements of the 
Graduate School of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

504. Kindergarten Teachers Workshop (2). A course planned for 
teachers of kindergarten-age children. Observations, lectures, discussions, 
laboratory experiences with specialists. (For certification credit only.) 

516. Literature in the Elementary School (2). A course designed to 
acquaint teachers with the resources, the functions and the use of 
children's books in the elementary school today. Designed for teachers 
in service. 

517. Reading in the Elementary School (3). Nature of the reading pro- 
cess. Principles, methods and materials for developing effective attitudes 
and skills in the reading program. Designed for teachers in service. 

518. Mathematics in the Elementary School (3). A study of the current 
mathematics program, including emphasis on meaning theory and on 
instructional materials, methods and procedures in teaching the funda- 
mental operations. Designed for teachers in service. 

519. Elementary School Science (2). A course in science for the ele- 
mentary school teacher with some emphasis on methods and materials 
for teaching. Designed for teachers in service. 

520. Social Studies in the Elementary School (3). Modern trends and 
practices in teaching the social studies in the elementary school. Dis- 
covery and use of local resources. Designed for teachers in service. 

521. Workshop in Language Arts — Elementary (2). A workshop de- 
signed to give experienced teachers practical assistance in improving the 
skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and observing. Designed 
for teachers in service. 

522. Diagnosing Learning Difficulties in Elementary and Junior High 
School (2). Procedures and techniques for classroom diagnosis of learn- 

139 



EDUCATION 

ing difficulties in basic school subjects; methods by which developmental 
and corrective measures can be adjusted for individual needs. Designed 
for teachers in service. 

526. Physical Science for the Elementary Teacher (2). Consideration 
will be given to ways in which science concepts are developed. Included 
will be the application of fundamental laws to properties of matter, 
sound, heat, light, electricity, magnetism, and atomic theory; applica- 
tions of various fields of chemistry. 

527. Workshop in Elementary Education (2-4). A general workshop on 
problems and trends in organization, administration, teaching and 
curriculum in the modern elementary school. Designed for teachers in 
service. 

528. Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers (2). Basic mathe- 
matics for teachers, with emphasis on the content of value to the ele- 
mentary school teacher. 

530. Recent Trends in the Teaching of Mathematics in the Secondary 
School (2). Designed to help familiarize teachers of grades 7-12 with the 
changes in content and methods of teaching secondary school math. De- 
signed for teachers in service. 

535. Reading in the Secondary School (3). A course designed to give 
an overview of reading development; to study the problems and pro- 
cedures of teaching the basic and mature reading skills to pupils in the 
junior and senior high school; to explore the implications of research 
for teaching reading and to identify problem areas. Designed for teachers 
in service. 

540. Exceptional Children (2). An introduction to problems and pro- 
grams of work with children who differ from the average in mental, 
physical, and emotional characteristics. 

541. Materials and Methods for Teaching Mentally Handicapped Chil- 
dren (2). Instructional content, procedures and programs for educable 
and trainable mentally retarded children. For special education majors. 
Pr. an introductory course in Exceptional Children and approval of 
instructor. 

542. Materials and Methods for Teaching Mentally Handicapped Chil- 
dren (2). A continuation of Ed. 541. Emphasis on the selection and 
development of materials for instruction and guidance of the mentally 
retarded. For Special Education majors. Pr. Education 540, 541, and 
approval of instructor. 

543. Laboratory Experiences with Mentally Handicapped Children (2). 
A practicum designed to meet North Carolina provisional requirements 

140 



N 



EDUCATION 

for certification in the teaching of mentally retarded children. For 
Special Education majors. By arrangement. Pr. Education 540, 541, 542 
and approval of instructor. 

550. Education of the Gifted (2). Definition and identification of men- 
tally gifted children. The role of the school and the parent in dealing 
with giftedness. Demonstrations and evaluation of gifted children. 
Designed for teachers in service. 

552. Libraries and Librarianship (3). Study of the library as a social 
institution: its historical development, patterns and objectives of library 
service, relationships of libraries to other social and educational agencies, 
standards for library service, and librarianship as a profession. 

553. Organizing Library Collections (3:3:2). A study of methods of 
organizing library collections for effective use, considering principles 
and techniques for the acquisition, cataloging, and classification of 
materials. Includes laboratory practice. 

554. Selection of Books and Related Materials for Young People (3). 
A survey of library materials appropriate for the high school student, 
with study of aids and criteria for their selection, and investigation of 
the reading interests of adolescents. 

555. School Library Administration (3). A study of the organization 
and administration of the school library: staff and student assistants, 
budget, quarters and equipment, library routines, scheduling, services 
to pupils and teachers, public relations, and evaluation. 

556. Selection of Books and Related Materials for Children (3). A sur- 
vey of the development of children's literature, with study of aids and 
criteria for selection of books and other materials for the elementary 
school pupil, and investigation of children's reading interests. 

557. Basic Reference Sources and Methods (3). The selection, evalua- 
tion, and use of basic reference materials, with emphasis on the selec- 
tion of materials, study of their contents, methods of locating informa- 
tion, and instruction in the use of the library. 

558. Non-Book Materials (3). A study of principles and techniques for 
the selection, acquisition, organization, circulation, and use of non-book 
printed materials and audio-visual materials in the library program. 
Pr. 553. Designed for teachers in service. 

560. Audio-Visual Methods of Teaching (2). Survey of basic psychology, 
literature, operation of audio-visual equipment. Criteria for previewing 
and auditioning materials, utilization of materials, sources; preview and 
audition films, filmstrips, tapes and records. Designed for teachers in 
service. 

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EDUCATION 

574. Educational Measurement and Evaluation (3). Designed for teach- 
ers, counselors, and administrators. Principles of measurement and 
evaluation; criteria for evaluation, methods of scoring and interpreta- 
tion of tests. Construction and use of teacher-made tests. Organization 
and function of school and system-wide testing programs. 

575. Principles of Guidance (3). Designed to help teachers, administra- 
tors, and other nonspecialists in guidance understand guidance roles 
and emphasis in education. Consideration will be given to guidance 
philosophy, principles and procedures. Designed for teachers in service. 

576. Counseling Theory and Practice (3). The application of principles, 
devices, instruments, etc., to practical problems in the school. Emphasis 
on techniques of interviewing and counseling. Pr. Ed. 575 or approval of 
instructor. Designed for teachers in service. 

579. School Public Relations (2). The fundamentals of public relations 
programs, cooperating agencies and organizations, the public interest 
and the community approach to education. Designed for teachers and 
other community participants. 

580. Supervision of Student Teachers (2-3). Intended for supervising 
teachers in public schools; aims of the student teaching experience; the 
beginning stage and its problems; more advanced levels of responsibil- 
ity; conferences and techniques of evaluation. 

581. Mental Hygiene in the School (3). A basic course in the principles 
of mental hygiene and their applications in school organization, in- 
struction, and management. Pr. Educational Psychology or equivalent. 
Designed for teachers in service. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

628. Seminar in Elementary Education (2). Advanced study of prob- 
lems in the field of elementary education. 

644. Problems in Program Development for the Mentally Handicapped 

(3). Major administrative, curriculum and instructional problems in 
public day and residential school programs for mentally retarded chil- 
dren and youth. Development of individual and co-operative student 
projects. For special education majors. Pr. Education 541, 542, 543, 
and approval of instructor. 

645. Seminar: Research in the Management of Mental Deficiency (3). 
A study of major contemporary developments and research in the 
medical, psychological, educational and sociological management of 
mentally retarded children and youth. Pr. Psychology 503 or equivalent 
and approval of instructor. 

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EDUCATION 

651. Seminar in Education of the Gifted (2). For school people in- 
volved in programs for mentally gifted children. Includes evaluation of 
research, experimentation with methodology and construction of func- 
tional materials. Pr. a basic course, or a year of experience in teaching 
gifted children. 

677. Seminar in Guidance (2). A seminar for counselors who are now 
engaged in guidance and who wish to extend technical skills, analyze 
current problems, and plan new activities in guidance. Enrollees are 
given the opportunity to deal with problems in guidance in accordance 
with their special needs and interests. 

678. Educational and Occupational Information (3). A study of the 
psychological, sociological, and economic factors influencing educational 
and occupational choice. The appraisal and use of educational and occu- 
pational materials for group and individual counseling, and their rela- 
tionship to school curriculum. 

679. Administration of Guidance Services (3). Organizing the guidance 
functions in elementary and secondary schools; administrative relation- 
ships and organizational patterns; initiating and developing the guidance 
program; roles and responsibilities of administrative, guidance, and re- 
lated personnel; in-service education, facilities and equipment. Emphasis 
will be given to developing and evaluating guidance services. 

680. Supervised Practicum in Guidance (3). This course is designed 
solely for Guidance majors seeking the Graduate Counselor's Certificate. 
Provision will be made for a total Guidance experience under the super- 
vision of a college coordinator and certified public school counselors. 
Practice will be provided in counseling techniques and all related Guid- 
ance services. 

684. The Junior High School (3). Organization of the Junior High School 
program in light of characteristics and educational needs of junior high 
school youth. 

685. Supervision: Improvement of Instruction (3). A study of the 
nature and function of supervision and of supervisory techniques such 
as workshops, conferences, observational visits, evaluation and research. 

686. Curriculum Construction (3). A study of curriculum problems 
and methods of improvement in the light of objectives and significant 
research findings. 

688. Elementary School Organization and Administration (2). Trends, 
practices and leadership roles in the organization and administration of 
the modern elementary school. 

143 



EDUCATION 

689. Secondary School Administration (2). Trends, practices and lead- 
ership roles in the organization and administration of the modern 
secondary school. 

690. Supervised Practicum in Administration (3). Provision will be 
made for a total administrative field experience under the supervision 
of a college coordinator and selected experienced public school principals. 

692. Independent Study (1-4). Guided readings, research and individual 
project work under direction of a staff member. Pr. graduate standing 
and approval of instructor. 

693. Individual Thesis Problems (2-6). Individual guidance and direc- 
tion in the development of a research problem in the master's degree 
thesis. 

695. Comparative Education (3). This course includes the definition and 
x, scope of comparative education, with particular emphasis on the racial, 
linguistic, geographical, economic and religious factors affecting educa- 
tion. Extensive study is made of education in England, France, Germany 
and U.S.S.R., and the relationship of humanism, socialism, nationalism, 
and democracy to education. 



REQUIRED CORE FOR MASTER'S DEGREE 

696. Philosophical Foundation of Education (3 s.h.). A study of the his- 
torical development of basic philosophies of education, with particular 
emphasis on the reasons for changes in educational outlook and prac- 
tices, including curricular and organizational movements and trends. 

697. Major Issues in American Education (3). Identification and analy- 
sis of the major issues facing American education. Requires practice in 
research, critical thinking, and evaluation. 

698. Human Development (3). An analysis of selected studies in social 
and biological sciences for the purpose of determining the basic psy- 
chological foundations to learning and human behavior involved, and 
their application to educational practices. 

699. Research Seminar (3). A study of the techniques and uses of edu- 
cational research, including practice in design and carrying out research, 
along with some of the more basic elements of statistics. Pr. Education 

574. 



144 



ENGLISH 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



Professors Bridgers, Bryant (Head of the Department), 
Bush, Jarrell 1 , Taylor; Associate Professors Buchert 2 , 
Charles, Gagen, Watson; Assistant Professors Dixon, 
Ellis, Putzel, Stephens; Instructors Brashear, Collier, 
Eibel, Hartwig, Hege, Ladd, Moore, Phillips, Powell, 
William Tucker, Walton, Wright; Lecturers Johnson, 
Snider; Teaching Assistants Angle, Swaim, Virginia 
Tucker; Assistants Benson, Davis, Dawson, McGlaun, 
McMillan, Pastore, Wilkinson, Wyrick. 

Proficiency in written English is a requirement for graduation. Any 
undergraduate whose work in the course in any department gives evi- 
dence of a lack of proficiency in written English or in reading ability 
may be referred to the Department of English for additional work. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 
Required Courses 

101-102. English Composition (3:3) -(3:3). A course designed to develop 
the student's ability to read with discrimination and to write effectively. 
First semester: practice in expository writing; the study of shorter 
works of poetry and fiction. Second semester: continued practice in writ- 
ing exposition; practice in the use of source materials; the study of 
novels and plays. Miss Charles and Staff. 

211-212. English Literature (3:3)-(3:3). Introduction to English litera- 
ture. Reading and writing discipline of English 101-102 continued; em- 
phasis on interpretation and intelligent appreciation of certain literary 
masterpieces. Miss Putzel and Staff. 

Elective Courses 

The courses listed below are open to qualified students according to 
the college regulations except as specifically stated in the course descrip- 
tions. 

The student who majors in English, in addition to taking the required 
twelve hours of English composition and literature, is expected to elect 
three hours of American literature and three hours of Shakespeare. 
Beyond these elections, with the advice of the head of the department of 
her departmental adviser, she will be expected to decide on one of the 



1 On leave first semester 1963-1964. 
2 On leave 1963-1964. 



145 



ENGLISH 

following sequences: (1) English Literature, (2) American Literature, 
(3) Writing. The student should also arrange, when possible, for the 
intelligent correlation of her sequence with other subjects. Details con- 
cerning these sequences may be obtained at the office of the Department 
of English. In preparation for the departmental examination, the major 
in English will be required to enroll in the departmental Coordinating 
Course, English 449, in which she will be given an opportunity to or- 
ganize the work she has taken in her major subject. 

105r. An Approach to Narrative (3:3). Intended primarily for fresh- 
men who do not plan to major in English, and designed to give the 
student a knowledge of various types of narrative and to stimulate pur- 
poseful and discriminating reading for pleasure. Mr. Jarrell. 

Writing and Language 

213. Journalism (2:2). A basic course in journalistic writing, with 
special emphasis on the straight news story. Analysis of student and 
professional articles. Mr. Snider. 

221, 222. Advanced Composition (3:3), (3:3). A course in the writing 
of fiction and poetry for students beyond the freshman year. Mr. Watson 
and staff. 

223, 224. Advanced Exposition (3:3), (3:3). A course in expository 
writing for students beyond the freshman year. Mr. Watson and Staff. 

319. English Grammar (1:1). Modern English grammar; the relationship 
of grammar and composition. Designed to satisfy the state requirements 
for prospective teachers of English who have taken or are taking courses 
in advanced composition. Credit will not be given for both 319 and 321. 
Miss Charles. 

321. Grammar and Composition (3:3). Present-day grammar viewed 
historically. Various types of writing. This course satisfies a state re- 
quirement for prospective teachers of English. Miss Charles. 

325, 326. The Writing Workshop I, II (3:3), (3:3). A writing laboratory 
course devoted to fiction, verse, and criticism. Student work criticized 
in class and in individual conferences; parallel reading in, and class dis- 
cussion of, the work of contemporary novelists, short-story writers, 
poets, and critics. Prerequisite: the completion of either 221 or 222, 
or permission of the instructor. Mr. Jarrell. 

Literature 

201. European Literary Masterpieces (3:3). Extensive reading of com- 
plete works in translation: Dante, Erasmus, Montaigne, Cervantes, and 
others. Miss Buchert and Miss Putzel. 

146 



ENGLISH 

202. European Literary Masterpieces (3:3). Extensive reading of com- 
plete works in translation: Moliere, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Kafka, 
and others. Miss Buchert and Miss Putzel. 

251. American Literature from the Beginnings to the Civil War (3:3). 
American culture and literature from early colonial times through Lin- 
coln, with emphasis upon the expansion of the American mind. Mr. 
Stephens and Mr. Ellis. 

252r. American Literature from the Civil War to the Present (3:3). 
American literature from 1850 to 1900, with emphasis on the Civil War 
and Reconstruction; westward expansion; the local color movement and 
regionalism; the rise of realism, the development of social revolt, and 
the beginning of naturalism. Mr. Stephens and Mr. Ellis. 

337. English Literature to 1500 (3:3). An introduction to the culture 
of the Middle Ages. Selected reading in English literature from Beowulf 
to Malory. Works in Anglo-Saxon and some of those in Middle English 
in translation. Mr. Bridgers. 

338. Literature of the English Renaissance, 1500-1610 (3:3). Readings 
in the poetry and prose, with emphasis on the development of thought 
and style. Miss Buchert. 

339. Shakespeare: The Early Plays and the Sonnets (3:3). Twelve plays 
will be studied, including The Merchant of Venice, the two parts of 
Henry IV, Romeo and Juliet, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, and 
Hamlet. Mr. Bryant and Staff. 

340. Shakespeare: The Later Plays (3:3). Twelve plays will be studied, 
including Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, Measure 
for Measure, and The Tempest. Mr. Bryant and Staff. 

342. The Seventh Century (3:3). The main lines of thought and style 
noted in the major writers from the beginning of the century through 
Milton and Bunyan. Emphasis upon the lyric and meditative poetry of 
the metaphysicals. Miss Charles. 

359. The Restoration and Early Eighteenth Century, 1660-1740 (3:3). 
A study of representative writers of the period, including Pepys, Dryden, 
Congreve, Defoe, Addison and Steele, Swift, and Pope. Mr. Tucker. 

360. The Later Eighteenth Century (3:3). A study of the decline of the 
Neoclassic tradition. Emphasis upon such writers as Richardson, Field- 
ing, Gray, Goldsmith, Boswell, Johnson, Burns and Blake. Mr. Tucker. 

343. Wordsworth and Coleridge (3:3). Intensive study of the works of 
Wordsworth and Coleridge, with attention to the development of the 
Romantic movement. Mr. Dixon. 

147 



ENGLISH 

344. The Later Romanticists (3:3). The major poems of the later Ro- 
mantic poets and some prose of the period. Mr. Dixon. 

345. Victorian Literature (3:3). Important writings (exclusive of the 
novel) of the era 1832-1880. Those studied include Tennyson, Browning, 
Arnold, Rossetti, Swinburne, Elizabeth Browning, Carlyle, Ruskin, New- 
man, Clough, Huxley, and others. Miss Bush. 

346. The Later Nineteenth Century (3:3). Writings of the last thirty 
years of the nineteenth century, including Hopkins, Hardy, Housman, 
Wilde, Meredith, Shaw, Kipling, Yeats, Wells, and others. Miss Bush. 

357, 358. Contemporary Poetry (3:3), (3:3). A study of contemporary 
poets whose writings reflect the changing aesthetic, social, political, and 
ethical conventions of our present civilizations. Either course may be 
elected independently of the other. Mr. Jarrell. 

371. The Literary Study of the Bible (3:3). The Bible as a part of the 
world's great literature; designed to give the student a better compre- 
hension of the Bible through study of its origins, history, structure, 
and literary qualities. Miss Bush. 

449r. Co-ordinating Course (3:3). Required of English majors in the 
senior year. Designed to give the student an opportunity to organize 
her work in her major subject and to coordinate this work with work 
taken in other fields. Staff. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). Staff. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

Literature and Language 

Prerequisite for graduate credit in all courses in literature listed 
Delow: the successful completion of at least nine hours of approved 
courses in English and American literature above Grade I. 

507, 508. Russian Literature in Translation (3:3), (3:3). A survey of 
Russian fiction, including novels, stories, and plays by Dostoevsky, Tol- 
stoy, Turgenev, Chekhov, Gogol, Leskov, Pushkin Goncharov, Saltykov- 
Shchedrin, Ostrovsky, and Gorky. These will be discussed as individual 
works of art, not as a part of literary history. Mr. Jarrell. 

513. The English Language (2:2) or (3:3). A study of the origins and 
the development of the English language, emphasizing the influences 
on its growth as well as its present usage. Miss Charles. 

531. The American Transcendentalists (3:3). A survey of the writings 
of the New England transcendentalist group with intensive study of 
the contributions of Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman. Mr. Stephens. 

148 



ENGLISH 

532. The American Romantic Novel (3:3). Development of the Ameri- 
can novel and romance from the early sentimental and gothic forms 
through Hawthorne and Melville. Some attention to related forms such 
as travel narrative, sketches, etc. Mr. Stephens. 

533. The Realistic and Naturalistic Novel (3:3). A survey of the 
American novel (1860-1920) that will include such writers as Twain, 
James, and Dreiser and also selected minor writers. Mr. Ellis. 

534. The Modern American Novel (3:3). A survey of modern American 
novels, including such writers as Faulkner, Hemingway, and Fitzgerald 
and also selected minor writers. Mr. Ellis. 

536. Chaucer (2:2) or (3:3). The literary study of selections from 
The Canterbury Tales, and parts of Troilus and Criseyde; selected minor 
poems. A project will be expected of the graduate student. Mr. Bridgers. 

539. Spenser (3:3). A study of Spenser's Faerie Queene and selected 
minor poems. Extensive reading in related works of the period. Mr. 
Bryant and Miss Putzel. 

540. Shakespeare, Eight Plays (3:3). A course background in the read- 
ing of Shakespeare's plays will be assumed. Mr. Bridgers and Mr. 
Bryant. 

541. Milton (3:3). A study of Milton's major poems and several of his 
most important works in their seventeenth-century setting. Miss Gagen. 

547. The English Novel through the Nineteenth Century (3:3). An his- 
torical and critical study of the English novel from its beginning through 
Thomas Hardy, with emphasis on the novel in the nineteenth century. 
Mr. Watson. 

548. The Modern Novel (3:3). A study of a group of selected novels 
of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries; emphasis on continental 
novelists with some comparative study of a few English and American 
masters. Mr. Bryant. 

549. Literary Criticism (3:3). A study of important critical writings 
from Plato to the present. Particular attention to English criticism. 
Miss Bush. 

550. Modern English Literature (3:3) or (2:2). Consideration of a se- 
lected group of outstanding contemporary writers: essayists, novelists, 
dramatists, and poets. Mr. Watson. 

552. Southern American Literature (3:3). A study of principal authors, 
from colonial times to the present, and literary movements related to 
the development and influence of the Southern tradition in American 
literature. Mr. Stephens. 

149 



ENGLISH 

555, 556. English Drama from Its Beginning through the Eighteenth 
Century (3:3), (3:3). First semester, English Drama from the Begin- 
nings to 1640. Second semester, English Drama of the Restoration and 
Eighteenth Century. Either course may be elected independently of the 
other. Miss Gagen, Miss Buchert. 

582. The Modern Drama (3:3). Drama of the late nineteenth century 
and the twentieth century. Mr. Stephens. 

Writing 

525, 526. Writing- Advanced: Fiction. Mr. Taylor. 

527, 528. Writing- Advanced: Poetry. Mr. Jarrell. 

529, 530. Writing- Advanced: Plays. Mr. Watson. 

The courses above constitute continuations of 325, 326, and are re- 
served for writers who have been encouraged to study writing through 
a second year. Prerequisites for graduate credit: (1) a successful com- 
pletion of a semester in advanced composition and in 325 or 326 or the 
equivalent; and (2) permission of the head of the Department of English 
and of the instructor. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

The graduate student in English may work toward one of three de- 
grees: the Master of Arts with a minor in an approved related field or 
with a minor in some field of American or English literature; the 
Master of Fine Arts with a major in writing and a minor either in 
other arts or in English literature; and the Master of Education with 
a major in English or a minor in English. Graduate programs are de- 
scribed in Chapter, pp. 

Prerequisite for writing courses planned for candidates for the M.F.A. 
in writing: the successful completion of at least eighteen hours in ap- 
proved courses in English and American literature above Grade I. Re- 
quired of all candidates for the M.F.A. in writing: Philosophy 690. 
Aesthetics (3:3). 

Literature and Language 

601. Bibliography and Methodology (3:3). An introduction to the scope, 
aims, materials, and methods of literary scholarship, including textual 
criticism. Mr. Bryant. 

611, 612. Seminar in the Literature of the English Renaissance (3:3), 
(3:3). Intensive investigation of selected authors or topics. First semes- 
ter, sixteenth century; second semester, early seventeenth century. 
Miss Gagen. 

150 



GEOGRAPHY 

633, 634. Studies in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century American Litera- 
ture (3:3), (3:3). Nineteenth-century seminar usually offered in fall 
term; early twentieth century in spring. Topics to vary. Mr. Stephens. 

655, 656. Contemporary British and American Literature (3:3), (3:3). 
In 1963-64: first term, an intensive study of the writings of W. B. Yeats, 
James Joyce, and D. H. Lawrence; second term: William Faulkner, T. S. 
Eliot, and Robert Frost. Mr. Watson. 

660. Modern English (3:3). A detailed study of modern American Eng- 
lish in its synchronic aspect. Mr. Bryant. 

617 a, b. Studies in Lyric and Narrative Verse: (a) Romantic; (b) 
Victorian (3:3), (3:3). Primarily for M.Ed, candidates. 

662 a, b, c. Studies in Poetry and Drama: (a) Sixteenth Century; (b) 
Seventeenth Century; (c) Eighteenth Century (3:3), (3:3), (3:3). Pri- 
marily for M.Ed, candidates. 

663 a, b, Studies in the Development of English Prose: (a) 1500-1660; 
(b) 1660-1900; (3:3), (3:3). Primarily for M.Ed, candidates. 

667 a, b. The English Novel (3:3), (3:3). Primarily for M.Ed, candidates. 

668. Directed Reading (3 to 6). Conducted by means of individual con- 
ferences. Program of reading formulated to meet the varying needs of 
each student. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy for the degree. Staff. 

Writing 

671, 672. Graduate Tutorial in Writing : Fiction. Mr. Taylor. 

673, 674. Graduate Tutorial in Writing : Poetry. Mr. Jarrell. 

675, 676. Graduate Tutorial in Writing Plays. Mr. Watson. 

677, 678. Special Problems in Writing. Mr. Jarrell, Mr. Taylor, and Mr. 
Watson. 

694. Thesis (2 to 6). Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 

Associate Professor Dozier (Head of the Department) ; 
Assistant Professor Schul ; Instructor Niedringhaus ; 
Assistant Parker. 

101r. World Human Geography (3:3). A world regional study in which 
the emphasis is on man and his distinctively human responses to various 
geographic situations throughout the earth. The nature and development 

151 



GEOGRAPHY 

of cultural regions will be studied through countries selected as repre- 
sentative. Students may not receive credit for both this course and 
Geog. 335. 

1 211-212. Physical Geography (3:2:3)-(3:2:3). An introduction to the 
earth science aspects of geography, such as weather processes and cli- 
mate, soils, natural vegetation, water resources, rocks and minerals, and 
surface morphology. Students may not receive credit for both this course 
and Geog. 335. 

237r. Economic Geography (3:3). A world study of the location and 
functioning of economic activity, with an emphasis on physical and 
human geographic factors in analyzing patterns of production, ex- 
change, and consumption. Required of sophomores in business education. 

1 335r. General Geography (3:2:3). A general survey of world environ- 
mental patterns and features, especially those of climate, the inter- 
relationships, the physical processes involved, and the human-economic 
significance. Required of elementary education majors. 

337. Geography of South America (3:3). A study of the physical en- 
vironmental conditions, resources, patterns of population and develop- 
ment, economic and social problems of the various countries of the South 
American continent. 

339. Geography of Middle America (3:3). A study of the physical en- 
vironmental conditions, resources, patterns of population and develop- 
ment, economic and social problems of Mexico, Central America, and 
the Caribbean Islands. 

341. Geography of Europe (3:3). An analysis of the influences of cli- 
mate, surface features, and natural resources on the distribution of 
peoples, the economy, and problems of modern Europe. 

342. Geography of the Soviet Union (3:3). A regional study emphasizing 
the relationships that exist between the physical environment and the 
cultural patterns in the Soviet Union. 

344. Geography of Anglo- America (3:3). A regional study emphasizing 
the relationships that exist between the natural environment and the 
human activities in each of the geographic regions of the U. S. and 
Canada. 

348. Geography of Asia (3:3). A survey of the physical features, natural 
resources, population distribution, and economic adjustments of the 
peoples of Eastern, Southeastern, and Southwestern Asia. Students may 
not receive credit for both this course and 548. 



*May not be used to satisfy the social science requirement. 

152 



GEOGRAPHY 

350. Geography of Africa (3:3). A study of the physical and cultural 
environments of Africa, with emphasis on the role of geographic factors 
in the historical, political, and economic development of the various 
regions of the continent. 

511. Climatology (3:3). A study of the meaning, scope, and methods of 
climatology with emphasis on the climatic elements, the climatic controls, 
and the climatic types of the various continents. Pr. 211, or permission 
of the instructor. 

523. Political Geography (2:2). Geographic relationships in the forma- 
tion, administration, and international problems of nations; emphasis is 
upon locational factors, boundaries, culture groups, core areas, and 
resource inequalities. 

538. Advanced Economic Geography: Agriculture (2:2). A study of 
factors relating to land use and agricultural productivity, emphasizing 
crop-environment relationships, systems, population and food problems, 
and expansion of agricultural frontiers. 

548. Geography of East Asia (2:2). A regional study emphasizing the 
relationships that exist between the physical environment and the 
cultural patterns in each of the geographic regions of Japan, Korea, 
China, and selected countries of Southeast Asia. (May not be taken by 
students with credit in 348). 

571. Cartography and Geographic Techniques (3:1:6). Introduction to 
maps and map-making, stressing drafting techniques, map design, and 
application of research methods to the map. 

576. Conservation of Natural Resources (2:2). The problem of the ex- 
haustibility of natural resources especially as it pertains to population 
pressure, the extent and character of resources, their use and misuse, 
and present conservation practices in the light of their adequacy for the 
future. 

601. Basic Concepts in Earth Science (2). Fundamental principles and 
processes of earth science; topics to be selected from the general fields 
of earth-sun relations, atmospheric temperature, pressure, circulation, 
moisture, mid-latitude frontal conditions, and climate types — together 
with laboratory exercises. Pr. Consent of instructor and Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

602. Basic Concepts in Earth Science (2). Fundamental principles and 
processes of earth science; topics to be selected from the general fields 
of rock and mineral analysis, weathering, soils, tectonic and gradational 
forces in surface morphology, and topographical map interpretation — 
together with laboratory exercises. Pr. Consent of instructor and Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

153 



GERMAN-RUSSIAN 

603 a, b. Special Studies in Physiography. (2), (2). A study of the 
physiographic regions of the United States, the genesis and pattern of 
the major landforms included within each, their distinctive character- 
istics, and their cartographic interpretation. (1st Semester: Eastern 
U.S.; 2nd Semester: Western U.S.) 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN AND RUSSIAN 

Associate Professor Baecker (Head of the Department) ; 
Assistant Professors Kurland, Rener; Lecturer Frank. 

GERMAN 

German 101-102, 103, 104, and 210 will not count toward a major in 
German. Suggested courses in support of a German major: English 301, 
302 (European Literary Masterpieces); History 391 (Germany and Cen- 
tral Europe), History 392 (Germany and Central Europe from 1815 to 
the Present); Geography 341 (Geography of Europe); Philosophy 312 
(History of Modern Philosophy). 

101-102. Elementary German (3:3) -(3:3). Essentials of grammar, graded 
reading, vocabulary building. Language laboratory facilities. 

103, 104. Intermediate German (3:3) -(3:3). Review of grammar, read- 
ing lyrics, short stories, and classical plays. 

210. Scientific and Technical German (3:3). German readings in chemis- 
try, physics, zoology, botany, geology. Prerequisite, 103. 

211r. German Conversation and Composition (3:3). For students desiring 
some proficiency in spoken and written German. Free conversation on 
a wide range of everyday subjects. Language laboratory facilities. 
Pr. 103, 104, or permission of the instructor. 

212. Intermediate Conversation (3:3). Free conversation in idiomatic 
German. Written work in dialogue form. Building up an active vocabu- 
lary. Laboratory facilities. 

317-318. Survey of German Literature (3:3) -(3:3). Survey of the Ger- 
man Literature to 1750. Major works and figures of the Medieval, the 
Renassiance, and the Baroque periods. 

321, 322. Goethe's Life and Selected Works (3:3) -(3:3). A study of the 
various periods of Goethe's literary activity; reading of works illustrat- 
ing different periods of his development. 

325, 326. German Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 

(3:3), (3:3). Selected works of representative writers in the fields of 
poetry and novel and drama. 

154 



GERMAN-RUSSIAN 

327, 328. The Classical Period of German Literature (3:3), (3:3). Repre- 
sentative works of Lessing, Schiller, Goethe. 

331. Lessing and His Time (3:3). 

332. Schiller's Life and Selected Works (3:3). 

345. German Fiction of the Nineteenth Century (3:3). Selected works 
of the more important writers are read. Emphasis upon the Romantic 
period. Collateral readings and reports. 

346. The German Drama of the Nineteenth Century (3:3). Brief lec- 
tures on the lives and works of the following authors: Kleist, Buchner, 
Grabbe, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Ludwig, and Hauptmann. 

401r. Goethe's "Faust" (3:3). 

491, 492. Readings for Seniors (3:3), (3:3). Required of all seniors 
majoring in German. A reading list will be provided to meet the needs 
of the individual student. Weekly reports are required 

RUSSIAN 

101-102. Elementary Course (3:3)-(3:3). Basic principles of grammar; 
reading of selected texts from Lermontov, Pushkin, Turgenov; some con- 
versation. 

203-204. Intermediate Course (3:3) -(3:3). Review of grammar, practice 
in conversation, selected readings from 19th and 20th century literature. 
Pr. 101-102. 

215. Russian Conversation and Composition (3:3). Conversational prac- 
tice based upon compositions and readings: conversation on a wide 
range of subjects. Pr. Concurrent with Russian 203-204, or consent of 
instructor. 

507, 508. Russian Literature in Translation (3:3), (3:3). A survey of 
Russian fiction, including novels, stories, and plays by Dostoevsky, 
Tolstoy, Turgenev, Chekhov, Gogol, Leskov, Pushkin, Goncharov, 
Saltykov-Shchedrin, Ostrovsky, and Gorky. These will be discussed as 
individual works of art, not as a part of literary history. Same as English 
507, 508. 



155 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
AND RECREATION 

Professors Martus (Head of the Department), Schriver; 
Associate Professors Davis, Griffin, Hennis, Leonard, 
McGee, Moomaw, Ulrich; Assistant Professors Greene, 
McCain, Riley, Shamburger; Instructors Alexander, 
Angle, Duncan, Flynn, Porter, White 1 , Teaching Assist- 
ant Locke; Graduate Assistants Carsey, Lintner, Slatton, 
Stroble. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

lOlr. Health (3:3). To promote the ideal of a well-balanced program 
for daily living and to emphasize the student's obligation to serve society 
by the promotion of individual, family, and public health. Required of 
all students seeking teacher certification; elective for all others. 

103r. Health (2:2). Basic principles of health maintenance and promo- 
tion. Required of all one-year commercial students. 

301. Health (3:3). The scientific approach to physical, emotional and 
social health problems; application of personal health knowledge and 
practices to community and world living. Open only to juniors and 
seniors who have not had Health 101. 

330. Family Health (3:3). The principles and protection of family 
health and safety, and home care of the sick. Pr. 101 or its equivalent. 
Elective for juniors, and seniors and qualified sophomores. 

334. Community Health (3:3). The broadening scope of community 
health, the attack of official and voluntary agencies upon major health 
problems, and the responsibility of the individual in the community 
health program. Pr. 101 or its equivalent. 

338. Safety and First Aid (3:3). Factual information, desirable atti- 
tudes and behavior in safety matters, essential to safety in the home, 
school, camp, and community. Presentation of the American Red Cross 
first aid instructor training course leading to certification as instructor 
for those who qualify. Teaching of first aid in community adult groups 
is emphasized. Pr. 101, or its equivalent. 

341r. Elementary School Health (3:3). Problems relevant to desirable 
health practices. Selection and organization of materials, methods of 
instruction, and the use of modern communications media are stressed. 



HDn leave, first semester 1963-1964. 

156 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION 

Required of majors in Elementary and Grammar-grade Education. Pr. 
101, Psychology 222, and Biology 101-102, or Chemistry 101-102 or 
103-104. 

369. Child Health (3:3). Growth and development as related to the 
health of children from prenatal life through adolescence. Consideration 
is given to meeting physical, emotional, and social needs in the care of 
children. Pr. 101, or Biology 277. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical education is required of all students in the freshman and 
sophomore years, and of all commercial students. Not more than two 
semesters of any one activity may be presented for credit. Juniors and 
seniors may elect courses listed in the catalogue as elective courses for 
credit, and may audit activity courses with the permission of the class 
chairman and the instructor. 

All students are classified for activity participation by the College 
Physician. Selection of activities for physical education instruction and 
recreation must be made on the basis of these recommendations. Motor 
skill scores, posture examinations, interests, needs, and previous expe- 
rience are used in the guidance of the student in the intelligent choice 
of activities for instruction and for leisure. A wide range of course 
offerings is available to students within the limitations of health status 
recommendations. 

In the latter part of the first semester of the freshman year, an 
orientation program is offered to all freshmen. This orientation course 
includes readings, assignments, discussions, and group participation in 
units of study in the history of physical education, the philosophy of 
modern physical education, and patterns of living defined as health 
practices, body mechanics, relaxation, and leisure. Through these experi- 
ences, the student has opportunities to develop understandings, appre- 
ciations, and attitudes in the theoretical approach to physical education 
as a part of his total educational experiences. 

Courses for Freshmen and Sophomores (%:2). 103, Body Mechanics; 
104, Basic Activities; 105, Modified Activities; 106, Rest; 121, Badmin- 
ton; 123, Softball; 125, Basketball and Softball; 127, Beginning Golf; 
130, Field Hockey; 131, Recreational Sports; 135, Soccer; 137, Speedball; 
139, Volleyball and Basketball; 140, Hall Ball; 141, Lacrosse; 142, Social 
Dance; 143, Folk Dance; 145, Beginning Modern Dance; 147, Square 
Dance; 149, Tap Dance; 151, Beginning Swimming; 161, Beginning 
Tennis; 163, Volleyball; 170, Fencing; 220, Archery; 227, Intermediate 
Golf; 228, Advance Golf; 245, Intermediate Modern Dance; 252, In- 
termediate Swimming (lower); 254, Intermediate Swimming (higher); 

157 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION 

256, Advanced Swimming; 258, Life Saving; 259, Water Safety In- 
structors; 262, Intermediate Tennis; 264, Boating and Canoeing; 266, 
Bowling; 109, Riding. 

103. Body Mechanics for the Individual (Mj:2). Group and Individual 
work in practical body mechanics, the use of the body in everyday ac- 
tivities; posture and relaxation. Particularly recommended for students 
whose posture examination indicates a need for work in this area. 

104. Basic Activities (%:2). Designed for the student who needs ad- 
ditional work in basic fundamental skills as evidenced by the motor 
skills tests. 

105. Modified Activities (%:2). Substituted for regular class work on 
the advice and recommendation of the College Physician and the head 
of the department, for those students for whom a program of light 
activities is recommended. Recreational activities adapted to the needs 
of individuals in the group. 

106. Rest (V2i2). Substituted for regular class work on the advice of 
the College Physician. Reading assignments and written work required 
in selected activities. 

107. Physical Education for Commercial Students (%:2). Selection of 
activity may be made in one of the following activities: swimming, rec- 
reational games, folk and social dance, tennis, or modern dance. 

108. Physical Education for Nursing Student (V2 :2). 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

241. Playground Organization and Management 

See p. 173. 

334. Camp Leadership (1:1). Lectures, discussions, observations, and 
required readings on camp program, camp organization and administra- 
tion, and the place of camping in the educational program. 

336. Advanced Modern Dance (1:2). Open only to students who have 
completed two semesters of the Modern Dance or who can demonstrate 
the necessary skill. 

337. Waterfront Supervision (1:2). Open only to students who can 
present the requisite skill in swimming. Designed for students interested 
in camp counselorships and summer recreational programs. Red Cross 
certification. 

338. Sports Organization and Management: Tennis (1:1). Designed 
especially for recreation leaders, camp counselors, high-school teachers, 

158 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION 

and social workers. Fundamentals of coaching: and standards of tourna- 
ment play with emphasis on the values of health protection and ethics 
of sportsmanship. 

339. Sports Organization and Management: Volleyball and Basketball 

(2:2). Adapted to meet the needs of recreation leaders, high-school 
teachers, and camp counselors. Fundamentals of coaching* and officiating 
in team sports. 

340. Sports Organization and Management: Recreational Sports and 
Softball (2:2). Adapted to meet the needs of recreational leaders, high- 
school teachers, and camp counselors. Fundamentals of coaching and 
officiating in team sports and organization and management of recrea- 
tional games. 

341r. Principles and Procedures in Physical Education (3:3). Integra- 
tion of principles in general education and physical education curriculum 
for Grades I to VI. Enrollment limited to Primary and Elementary 
Education Majors. 

342. Social, Folk and Country Dance (2:2). A study of the national 
characteristics of music, costumes, dances, and folk arts. Designed for 
the high-school teacher, community worker, or recreation leader. 

343. Festivals for School and Community (1:1). A study of traditional 
folk festivals and their adaptation to school and community use. Each 
student is required to write one festival based on the semester's study. 
The student should have had one semester in folk dances. 

344r. Community Recreation (3:2:3). The philosophy of recreation; pro- 
gram planning for various types of groups, practice teaching in social 
recreation; and observation in local community programs. Designed 
especially for recreational leaders, camp counselors, girl scout execu- 
tives, county home demonstration agents and social workers. 

345. Elementary Dance Composition 

See p. 173. 

346. Intermediate Dance Composition 

See p. 173. 

354. History and Theory of the Dance 

See p. 174. 

355. Applied Dance (2:1:3). A co-ordinating course designed to increase 
skill in technique and the use of related art materials. 

356. Applied Dance (2:1:3). Continuation of first semester course in 
which advanced skill and maturity in the selection and use of materials 
should be demonstrated. 



159 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The department offers graduate and undergraduate courses leading 
to the Bachelor's and Master's degrees. 

In co-operation with the Department of Sociology, the Department 
offers work leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in Recreation Leader- 
ship. See p. 65. 

The curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science degree with a 
major in Physical Education is based on the study of natural sciences, 
social sciences, and health. Courses in the humanities are required to 
insure the cultural background essential to women who hope to hold 
positions in this field of education. At the beginning of the junior year, 
the professional student in physical education may choose a program 
emphasizing teacher education, dance education, recreation in physical 
education, corrective physical education, or dance performance. The 
teacher education and dance education sequences include courses in Edu- 
cation and Psychology required for a Grade A secondary-school teaching 
certificate. 

No student is permitted to enter upon or continue the work of the 
professional course if in the judgment of the College Physician his 
physical condition renders it inadvisable. 

For the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree with a major 
in Physical Education, see p. 72. 

Graduate work is offered leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree 
with a graduate major in dance, the Master of Education degree with 
a major in Physical Education, and the Master of Science degree in 
Physical Education. 

See also Chapter VIII, Graduate School and department bulletin. 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

111, 112. Theory and Practice in Selected Activities (V 2 :6), (V 2 :6). 
Speedball, swimming, body mechanics, recreational sports, stunts, volley- 
ball, rhythmic fundamentals, tennis, softball, modern dance orientation, 
safety. 

211, 212. Theory and Practice in Selected Activities (V 2 :Q), (%:6). 
Field hockey, archery, modern dance, bowling, social dance, basketball, 
badminton, folk dance, swimming, golf, tap dance, American dance, 
coaching, orientation, and safety. 



160 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION 

241. Playground Organization and Management (3:3). Organization and 
leadership, techniques of teaching playground games, lead-up games to 
team sports, stunts, relays, and safety. Includes programming for and 
construction of school and community playgrounds. Observations of 
playground activities. 

345. Elementary Dance Composition (2:2). Includes the study of the 
rhythmic and musical bases of dances, the elements of art and theatre 
in the structure of dances. 

346. Intermediate Dance Composition (2:2). Includes the study of the 
historical and anthropological bases of dance form from primitive 
through modern times. 

348. The Dance Curriculum (2:2). Evaluating and grading dance ma- 
terials. Teaching methods in modern dance, folk, tap, American country, 
and social dance. The administration of the dance curriculum and the 
organization and problems of the dance production. 

351. Principles of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (3:2:3). 
Study and analysis of the biological, sociological, psychological, edu- 
cational, and philosophical foundations of physical education and health 
including the definition, relationship, and application of principles to the 
teaching of physical education. Determination of the aim and objectives 
of physical education. Directed laboratory experiences in selected 
activities; child rhythms, and English folk dance. 

352. The Curriculum in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

(2:2). Construction of modern programs of physical education including 
units in health and recreation education. Study of state and city pro- 
grams. Development of courses of study, instructional units, and lesson 
plans. Observations of junior high school and secondary school programs. 

354. History and Theory of the Dance (2:2). The history and motiva- 
tion of dance from primitive through present times. Study of theories 
of leading dancers from the beginning of theatrical dance through 
modern times. 

359, 360. Techniques and Teaching Methods in Physical Education 
Activities (2:6), (2:8). Gymnastic teaching, coaching and officiating in 
speedball, hockey, basketball, tennis, softball, fencing, folk dance teach- 
ing, intramurals marching, modern dance, camp leadership, modified 
field events. Opportunities for officiating in team and individual sports 
and procedures for the organization of field days, sport days, play days, 
festivals, and safety. 

367. Methods and Materials in Health and Physical Education (2:2). 
Consideration given to materials, co-ordination of health and physical 

161 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION 

education with other subjects. Emphasis is given to program planning, 
problem-centered teaching, and the use of modern communications media. 

376. Kinesiology (3:3). Analysis of human motion. Study of joint and 
muscle function, mechanical principles governing human motion. An- 
atomic and mechanical analysis of physical education activities, basic 
skills and posture. 

434. Camp Leadership (0). In June of the junior year, professional 
students in physical education are required to attend a two-week camp 
period in camping experience. During this summer camp program, 
the student must successfully pass work in the following activities: 
practical camp leadership, volleyball coaching and officiating, water- 
front supervision, swimming methods, recreational sports, boating 
and canoeing. The student is given instruction in activities which 
can be adapted for use in camps, in practical problems of camping, and 
in camp counseling. The satisfactory completion of all work is necessary 
before the student may enter the senior year in physical education. 

449. Seminar in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (3:3). The 
course is designed to co-ordinate the work of the student and to serve 
as a guide in the co-ordination of interpretations, philosophy, and under- 
standings in modern physical education. 

461, 462. Directed Teaching in Health and Physical Education (3:5), 
(3:5). Techniques of teaching health and physical education under 
supervision. Regular observation and teaching in the Curry School, city 
schools, college service program, and teaching centers in the state. 
$10. Admission by application only. Acceptance contingent upon approval 
of department chairman, major class adviser, and major professor. 

464. Administration of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

(2:2). A study of the administration of physical education in secondary 
schools and colleges, with special reference to the problems of the 
administrator in the conduct of the integrated program of physical 
education, health, and recreation. 

465. Preventive and Corrective Physical Education (2:3). The study of 
the preventive and corrective programs in physical education. Organi- 
zation and techniques of the physical examination. The study of body 
mechanics, corrective exercises, relaxation and massage. Preparation 
for teaching preventive and corrective physical education. 

468. Evaluation and Measurement in Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation (2:2). Survey of tests and the application of measurement 
in physical education including related areas of health and recreation. 
Elementary testing procedures. 

162 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION 

469, 470. Advanced Techniques and Teaching Methods in Physical Edu- 
cation (1:5), (1:5). Modern dance, golf, handball, squash, life saving, 
fencing, bowling, sports coaching, officiating, and safety. This course 
includes assisting in college classes in physical education and officiating 
in physical education activities of the College and community. Electives 
are open in handicraft, scouting, golf, riding, and canoeing. 

476. Problems Seminar (2:2). A general survey of current problems in 
the fields of physical education. The course will provide an opportunity 
for the student to specialize in a problem of her choice. The emphasis 
of the problem shall be in dance, body mechanics, recreation, or teacher 
education. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). 

Gymnasium Costume 

Every woman student in the regular university courses must provide 
herself with a regulation gymnasium outfit as follows : 

Two washable suits $12.30 

Regulation shoes 3.85 

Two pair socks 1.60 

Sweater 3.25 

Total $21.00 

Students in the Commercial course are not required to purchase uni- 
forms before registration. (These may be purchased at the University 
for $11.50.) Men students should consult with the head of the department. 

Gymnasium suits must be secured after the student comes to college 
from the University Bookstore which handles the uniform adopted 
and required by the Department of Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation. 

No swimming suit except a regulation cotton suit may be worn in 
the swimming pool. This suit is supplied by the Department. The suit 
is laundered by the University after each swimming period. Women 
students using the pool must have bathing shoes and caps. 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

522. Anthropological Bases of Dance (2:2) or (3:3). A study of the 
dances of the primitive and developed cultures. Folk, court dances, and 
ballet as expressions of social forms and cultures. 



163 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION 

523. Dance of the Twentieth Century (2:2) or (3:3). Development and 
trends of the various types of dance; their relationship to older social 
forms and cultures; to developments in the other arts today and to our 
present-day social pattern. 

530. Recreational Crafts (2:2) or (3:3). Organization of crafts pro- 
gram and practical experience in the use of various craft materials. 

552. Outdoor Education (2:2). A preparation of leaders in the admin- 
istration and guidance of school camping and outdoor education pro- 
grams with special emphasis on programming, the acquisition of skill 
techniques, and administrative problems. 

553. Organization and Administration of Recreation (2:2). A study and 
general survey of programs in recreation, with special emphasis on the 
problems which arise in planning the program. 

557. The Adapted Program in Physical Education (2:2). A survey of 
the need of an adapted program in physical education. The development 
of related problems with special emphasis on advanced techniques for 
teaching body mechanics at different age levels. 

563. The History of Physical Education (2:2). The historical develop- 
ment of physical education, with special emphasis on the educational 
philosophies of each era, and the influences of these philosophies on 
current practices in physical education. 

571. Physical Education for the Handicapped (3:3). A survey of ortho- 
pedic defects. Study of the physical education program for the handi- 
capped. Individual study in related problems. Observations of orthopedic 
conditions through visits to orthopedic hospitals, clinics, and schools. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

611. Introduction to Research in Physical Education (3:3). A study of 
the various methods and techniques used in research. Methods of pre- 
paring bibliographies, of selecting and defining problems. Outlining a 
research project. 

612. Research Seminar (3:3). A review and evaluation of research in 
selected areas of health, physical education, and recreation. Discussions 
of applications of research findings. 

613. Advanced Principles and Philosophy of Physical Education (3:3). 
Integration and application of principles in general education and physi- 
cal education as foundations for the development of a practical philos- 
ophy of modern physical education. 

614. Professional Literature (2:2) or (3:3). Basic literature and current 
readings in the various areas of physical education. 

164 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION 

615. Visual Aids in Physical Education (2:2). Survey of materials 
available, and use of visual aids in teaching situations. Problem in 
developing a visual aid project. 

616. Problems in Organization and Administration (2:2). Problems in 
organization and administration of health and physical education for the 
advanced student. 

617r. Current Theories and Practices of Teaching Sports (2:2). Method- 
ology and practice at various skill levels. Emphasis on seasonal activity. 
618r. Current Theories and Practices of Teaching Sports (2:2). Method- 
ology and practice at various skill levels. Emphasis on seasonal activity. 

620. Rhythmical Analysis (3:3). Development of the ability to analyze 
complex musical forms and musical devices of composition, and to evalu- 
ate them for dance purposes. 

621. Administration of the Dance Curriculum (3:3). Curriculum plan- 
ning on all grade levels in all types of dances. Review of principles, 
aim, objectives and methods of teaching dance. A study of the problems 
of equipment and facilities, and of administration and organization of 
the dance production. 

624. Survey of Contemporary Dancers (3:3). A study of the personal 
approaches and techniques as illustrative of the theories of leading 
modern dancers. 

631. Leadership, Organization, and Administration for Camping (2:2) 
or (3:3). A course designed primarily for those interested in camp 
administration. Offered at camp. 

649. Seminar in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (3:3). The 
course is designed to co-ordinate the work of the graduate student and 
to serve as a guide in the co-ordination of advanced interpretations, 
philosophy, and understandings in modern physical education. 

650. Scientific Bases of Physical Education (3:3). Application of prin- 
ciples derived from the scientific bases of physical education to philoso- 
phy, organization, and methodology of teaching and research. 

651. Sports Seminar (2:2). A symposium designed to better under- 
standings and improve skills through the guidance of recognized experts 
in selected sports. 

668. Evaluation and Measurement in Physical Education (2:2). Survey 
of tests and the application of measurement to physical education; 
methods of administering tests and using data. 

676. Problems Seminar (1) to (4). A general survey on the graduate 
level of current problems in the field of physical education. The course 

T65 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION 

will provide an opportunity for the student to develop a problem in the 
area of her choice. The emphasis of the problem shall be in dance, or 
body mechanics, or recreation, or sports in teacher education. Required 
of all candidates for the Master of Education degree. Credit may be 
divided over 2 or more semesters. Problems Advisor. 

685. Choreography for Solo and Duet Dances (3:3). Problems in pre- 
classic and modern form to include the study of music suitable for these 
forms, their qualities and time-space characteristics. Emphasis will be 
placed on student evaluation and development of aesthetic standards. 

686. Choreography for Large Groups and Long Dances (3:3). Chore- 
ography based upon the projection of an idea or mood with careful 
selection of the proper music, use of line, space and time requirements. 
A laboratory in dance production for practice and experiments. 

690. Experimentation and Analysis (3:3). Experimentation and analysis 
of the utilization of contemporary theories of dance and the graphic 
arts. Designed to meet the needs of and confined to election by those 
graduate students who are not dance majors. Elective for those students 
who are considered to have a sufficiently broad background in dance. 

694. Thesis (1) to (6). Required of all candidates for the degree of 
Master of Fine Arts with a major in dance. A concert of the student's 
own choreography. In the presentation, use may be made of another 
dance or dancers, of a musician or both. The student must select her 
music, design the stage decor, and supervise the execution. She must 
plan the lighting and give all instructions for curtains, lights, and stage 
crews. The thesis shall have two parts: (1) the creative work, which 
must demonstrate the mastery of technique and of scholarship of the 
dance; and (2) the scholarly paper, which must demonstrate a power of 
generalization resting on solid methodology. Required of all M.F.A. 
students. Credits up to six semester hours may be devided over two or 
more semesters. Thesis adviser. 

Required of all candidates for the degree of Master of Science in 
Physical Education: A thesis in the form of independent research study. 
Credit may be divided over two or more semesters. Thesis adviser. 

695. Independent Study (1) to (3). Intensive study in an area of 
special, interest in physical education, recreation, or dance. Open to 
graduate students. Pre-requisites : demonstrated competency for inde- 
pendent work and consent of departmental academic adviser and the 
instructor. 



166 



HISTORY 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professors Bardolph (Head of the Department), Fergu- 
son, Pfaff, Singletary ; Associate Professors Beeler, Hege, 
Parker, Robinson, Wright; Assistant Professors Clowse, 
Clutts, Connelly 2 , Kurland, Luczynski, Spurgeon; In- 
structors Barksdale, Hunt, Keziah, Yavenditti. 

HISTORY* 

101-102. Modern European History (3:3)-(3:3). Since 1500, with back- 
grounds in ancient and medieval Europe. Staff. 

105. The World In Our Time (3:3). A survey of recent world de- 
velopments. Mr. Parker. 

211, 212. The United States: A General Survey (3:3), (3:3). First 
semester: to 1865. Second semester: since 1865. Staff. 

213r. The United States Since 1865 (3:3). Emphasizing economic de- 
velopment. Primarily for majors in Business Education; elective for 
others who have not had History 212. Miss Hege. 

215. The Civilizations of Asia (3:3). A survey of the history, institu- 
tions, and culture of India, China, and Japan, from earliest times to 
about 1700. Limited reference to Southeast Asia, Central Asia, and 
Korea. Mr. Wright. 

216. The Civilizations of Asia (3:3). A study of the impact of the West 
on Asia, and Asia's response; the development of nationalism and 
Communism. The focus is on India, China, and Japan in the 19th and 
20th centuries. Mr. Wright. 

337. The American Colonies (3:3). A study of the political, economic, 
and intellectual developments of the English colonies. Mr. Clowse. 

338. South America (3:3). Historical development of the continent of 
South America with emphasis on twentieth-century politics. Mr. Parker. 

340. Middle America (3:3). Historical development of Mexico, Central 
America, and the West Indies with emphasis on twentieth-century 
politics. Mr. Parker. 

342. The United States, 1877 to 1917 (3:3). Selected topics in the 
political, economic and cultural history of the United States in the era 
of America's emergence as an industrial and urban society and as a 
world power. Clutts. 



1 A student majoring in either history or political science cannot have more than a 
total of 42 hours of work in history or political science combined beyond the required 
freshman history, count toward graduation. 

2 On leave, second semester, 1962-1963. 



167 



HISTORY 

343. North Carolina To 1865 (3:3). Mr. Robinson. 

344. North Carolina Since 1865 (3:3). Mr. Robinson. 

348. The United States Since 1918 (3:3). Selected topics in the political, 
economic, and cultural history of the United States since World War I. 
Miss Hege. 

355. The Renaissance (3:3). A study of the background, causes and 
progress of the intellectual and cultural movements in Europe in the 
fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries. 

356. The Reformation (3:3). A study of the Reformation period in 
European History. 

373. England To 1600 (3:3). Origins and evolution of English culture 
and the English constitution. Mr. Spurgeon. 

374. England Since 1600 (3:3). A continuation of History 373, but de- 
signed for those who wish to take the course separately. Mr. Spurgeon. 

381. The Near and Middle East (3:3). Emphasizing developments since 
World War I. Mr. Wright. 

382. The Far East (3:3). China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India and 
Pakistan, emphasizing the impact of Western imperialism, Asian 
nationalism and Communism. Mr. Wright. 

391. Germany and Central Europe (3:3). A study of the main political, 
economic, and cultural developments, with special emphasis on basic 
factors and problems in German history, from the origins to 1815. 

392. Germany and Central Europe, From 1815 to the Present (3:3). A 
continuation of History 391, but may be taken separately. Special em- 
phasis is given to the "German problem" and contemporary Germany. 

401, 402. Individual Study (1) to (3). A directed program of reading 
or research. Available to the qualified student upon the recommendation 
of an instructor. Staff. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). 

FOR JUNIORS, SENIORS AND GRADUATES 

501a. Social History of the United States To 1865 (2:2). Early Ameri- 
can life, with special attention to changing religious, intellectual, 
aesthetic, literary, social, and economic current, and their influence upon 
the shaping of the American tradition. Mr. Bardolph. (Not offered 
1964-1965.) 

168 



HISTORY 

601b. Social History of the United States Since 1865 (2:2). A continu- 
ation of History 501a, but may be taken separately. Mr. Bardolph. (Not 
offered 1964-1965.) 

502. Problems of Latin America (2:2). Dictatorship in government, 
colonialism in the economy, illiteracy in society, church-state relation- 
ships, role of the Indian, and hemispheric cooperation presented against 
their historical background. Mr. Parker. 

503. Main Currents in Western Civilization: The Twentieth Century 

(2:2). Trends in interrelationships in major aspects of contemporary 
culture. Discussion of principal alternatives confronting Western man. 
Readings in the works of leading thinkers of our time. Mr. Phaff. 

504 a, b. Contemporary Problems in International Relations (2:2). Inter- 
national political questions in historical context, (a) with emphasis upon 
their handling by the United Nations, regional organizations, and in- 
dividual nations; (b) with emphasis upon an analysis of the questions 
themselves and alternative solutions. Mr. Parker. 

1 515. American Foreign Policy (3:3). An historical approach to con- 
temporary problems. Mr. Singletary. 
526. The Civil War and Reconstruction (3:3). Mr. Singletary. 

2 528. Constitutional History of the United States (3:3). A study of the 
leading principles and practices of American government, examined in 
their historical context and illustrated by Supreme Court cases in 
Constitutional law. Miss Hunt. 

547. History of the South (3:3). An interpretation of the political, 
economic, social, and cultural forces in the evolution of the South. Mr. 
Ferguson. 

549. Social and Cultural Forces in the United States To 1865 (3:3). 
The development of American society, with emphasis on the life of the 
people, and the influence of changing religious, intellectual, aesthetic, 
literary, social, and economic currents. Mr. Bardolph. 

550. Social and Cultural Forces in the United States Since 1865 (3:3). 
A continuation of History 549, but also open to those who wish to take 
the course separately. Mr. Bardolph. 

553. Ancient Civilization (3:3). The Ancient World to the death of 
Justinian, with emphasis on the political and cultural development of 
Greece and Rome, and the rise of Christianity. Mr. Beeler. 



1 Same as Political Science 515. Major students in either history or political science 
who take History (Political Science) 515 shall count it in their own major, subject to 
all the restrictions applying to courses in their major sequence. 

2 Same as Political Science 528. Major students in either history or political sciendie 
who take History (Political Science) 528 shall count it in their own major, subject to 
all the restrictions applying to courses in their major sequence. 



169 



HISTORY 

554. Medieval Civilization (3:3). From the middle of the sixth century 
to the end of the fifteenth. Emphasis is placed on medieval life and 
manners, the rise and decline of the universal church, and the emergence 
of centralized governments from feudal localism. Mr. Beeler. 

561. The Age of Absolutism (3:3). Europe 1648-1789, emphasis on 
French history: Louis XIV; Eighteenth century enlightened monarchs; 
the Old Regime; background of the French Revolution. Mr. Connelly. 

566. Europe Since 1920 (3:3). Domestic developments, internal politics, 
and the international relations of the major countries of Europe, from 
the Treaty of Versailles to the present. Mr. Luczynski. 

568. The French Revolution and Napoleon (3:3). The struggle for 
social, economic, and political democracy during the Revolution and the 
advancement or negation of progress toward those goals under Napoleon. 
Mr. Connelly. 

569. Europe in the Nineteenth Century (3:3). Emphasis will be placed 
upon social, cultural, and intellectual history. Works of leading thinkers 
will be read and discussed. Mr. Pfaff. 

570. Europe in the Twentieth Century (3:3). A continuation of History 
569, but may be taken separately. Mr. Pfaff. 

1 571. Political Theory (3:3). The works of leading thinkers from ancient 
times to the nineteenth century. Mr. Pfaff. 

2 572. Political Theory (3:3). The nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
A continuation of History (Political Science) 571, but may be taken 
separately. Mr. Pfaff. 

577. Russia To 1900 (3:3). An introduction to the old Russia of Kiev 
and Muscovy, followed by a more intensive survey of the eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries. Mr. Kurland. 

578. Russia Since 1900 (3:3). The end of the Tsarist Empire, the revol- 
ution of 1917 and its aftermath, the Soviet Union under Stalin, and 
recent developments. Mr. Kurland. 

Courses for Graduates 

600. Historiography (3:3). The history, methods, and philosophy of 
historical scholarship. Required of all candidates for the M.A. degree 
in History. Mr. Parker. 



iSame as Political Science 571. Major students in either history or political science 
who take History (Political Science) 571 shall count it in their own major, subject to 
all the restrictions applying to courses in their major sequence. 

2Same as Political Science 572. Major students in either history or political science 
who take History (Political Science) 572 shall count it in their own major, subject to 
all the restrictions applying to courses in their major sequence. 

170 



HISTORY 

601. Seminar in European History (3:3). Selected problems in European 
History, before 1815. Mr. Connelly. 

602. Seminar in European History (3:3). Selected problems in European 
History, since 1815. Mr. Luczynski. 

611. Seminar in American History (3:3). Selected problems in American 
History, before 1865. Mr. Ferguson. 

612. Seminar in American History (3:3). Selected problems in American 
History, since 1865. Mr. Bardolph. 

699. Thesis (3 to 6). Staff. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 1 

For Juniors, Seniors and Graduates 

321r. The Federal Government (3:3). Origin, organization, and develop- 
ment, with special attention to government in action and to administra- 
tion. Miss Hunt. 

322. State and Local Government (3:3). Structure and functions of 
government in the state and local fields. Miss Hunt. 

323. International Politics (3:3). Analysis of basic factors of power 
among nations; imperialism; national policies. Mr. Wright. 

324. International Organization (3:3), International law and organi- 
zation, with emphasis on the United Nations. Mr. Wright. 

327. American Political Parties (3:3). Party development and organi- 
zation, campaigns and elections, political machines. Miss Hunt. 

376. Comparative Government (3:3). Parliamentary and Communist 
governments in Europe. Miss Hunt. 

401, 402. Individual Study (1) to (3). A directed program of reading or 
research. Available to the qualified student upon the recommendation of 
an instructor. Staff. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). 

2 515. American Foreign Policy (3:3). An historical approach to con- 
temporary problems. Mr. Singletary. 

3 528. Constitutional History of the United States (3:3). A study of the 
leading principles and practices of American government, examined in 
their historical context and illustrated by Supreme Court cases in 
Constitutional law. Miss Hunt. 



1 A student majoring in either political science or history cannot have more than a 
total of 42 hours in history and political scienec combined beyond the required freshman 
history, count toward graduation. 

2See note 3 on page 3. 

3 See note 4 on page 3. 



171 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Wl. Political Theory (3:3). The works of leading thinkers from 
ancient times to the nineteenth century. Mr. Pf aff . 

2 572. Political Theory (3:3). The nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
A continuation of Political Science (History) 571, but may be taken 
separately. Mr. Pfaff. 



THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Naomi G. Albanese, Dean 

Professors Albanese, Johnson, Keeney, Penn, Ridder, 
Sperry, Street; Associate Professors Canada y, Hathaway, 
Hobbs, Lowe, Magee, Staley; Assistant Professors Day, 
Deemer, Dickey, Spahr, Stringer, White ; Instructors Dicks, 
Freedman, Henkel, Smith, Thompson, Wagoner, Willing- 
ham; Teaching Assistant Singletary; Research Instructors 
Buchanan, Garner, Kivett ; Graduate Fellows Deal, Duck- 
worth, Foster; Graduate Assistants Alexander, Chang, 
Everett, Fes mire, Haywood, Hefner, Hodges, Hollo way, 
Kendall, Lewis, Nelms, Proffitt, Shoffner, White, 
Yates; Assistant Director of Family Development Institute 
Ashby. 

The School of Home Economics offers both undergraduate and grad- 
uate courses in its various subject-matter fields, leading to the Bache- 
lor's, Master's and Doctor's degrees. 

The subject-matter areas of home economics include child develop- 
ment and family relations, clothing and textiles, foods, nutrition and 
institution management, home economics education, and housing and 
management. 

The general education requirements of this program include courses 
in the humanities, the biological, physical, and social sciences. 

The specialized curricula in home economics may lead to many 
careers and professions, including public school and college teaching, 
extension service, nursery school education, adult education, nutrition, 
food demonstration work, hospital dietetics, school lunchroom manage- 
ment, merchandising, interior designing, experimental laboratory work, 
research, and home economics journalism. See requirements page . . . 



1 See note 1 on page 170. 
2 See note 2 on page 170. 



172 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Courses listed "For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates" may- 
be taken for graduate credit, provided an additional problem, equivalent 
to one semester hour of work, is approved by the instructor and satis- 
factorily completed. 

THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
MASTER'S AND DOCTOR'S DEGREES 

Before being admitted to candidacy for the Master's and Doctor's 
degree in home economics, the student must have received a Bachelor's 
degree in home economics or in a related field from an accredited college 
or university. See Chapter VIII, Graduate School. 

GENERAL COURSES 
For Undergraduates 

105r. Orientation (0:1). Personal development; choice of professions in 
home economics; the development of home economics. Required of all 
freshman majors, sophomore transfers. 

401r. Special Problems in Home Economics (1) to (4). Conference hours 
to be arranged. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

500. Supervised Professional Experience (1-4:0:3-12). Supervised pro- 
fessional experience in selected commercial or industrial organizations, 
public or private agencies, in accordance with the major interests of 
the student. 

For Graduates 

601r. Special Problem in Home Economics (1) to (4). Conference hours 
to be arranged. 

611r. Graduate Seminar (0). Required of students registered for 650; 
optional for other graduate students. 

630r. Fundamentals of Laboratory Research in Home Economics (3:3). 
Methods of research adapted to the different subject-matter fields of 
home economics, to develop the scientific approach and techniques neces- 
sary for research. 

640. Design and Philosophy of Research in Home Economics (2:2), (3:3). 
Application of logic and the scientific method to problems in home 

173 



HOME ECONOMICS 

economics. Progress in research in home economics. Survey, field, ex- 
perimental and historical methods of research. Development of a re- 
search plan. Understanding: of research reports. 

650r. Thesis Problem (1) to (6). Required of all candidates for the 
degrees of Master of Science and Master of Science in Home Economics. 
Credit may be divided over two or more semesters. 

670r. Minor Research (2) to (6). An individual problem which may be 
elected by candidates for the degree of Master of Education. 

740. Home Economics in Higher Education (3:3). Home Economics in 
Higher Education: scope, development, philosophy, objectives, organiza- 
tion, curriculum. Pr. Master's Degree or consent of instructor. 

750. Dissertation Problem (2) to (24). Required of all candidates for 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Credit may be divided over two or 
more semesters. 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS 

For Undergraduates 

302r. Child Development (3:2: observation). Development of the young 
child in the home. Pr. Psychology 221 or approved equivalent. Not open 
to students with credit in Psychology 326. Observation in the nursery 
school is required. 

412r. Family Relationships (2:4). Approach to marriage, marriage ad- 
justment and the relationships of parents and children as they are 
affected by modern living. Pr. or parallel 302 or Sociology 321, or 
approved equivalent. Course completed in nine weeks. 

462. Supervised Teaching in the Nursery School (3:1:8). Teaching ex- 
perience with preschool children and their parents. Pr. basic knowledge 
of general psychology, child development, nursery education, or equiva- 
lent, upon the consent of the instructor. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

522. Family Life Education (3:3). Objectives and methods in family 
life education. Pr. or parallels, 302 and 412. 

532. Nursery School Education (3). The theory, methods and materials 
of nursery education. Pr. or parallels, 302 and 412, or approved equiva- 
lents. Group conferences with experience in the nursery school. 

542. Creative Activities for Preschool Children (3:3). Principles and 
components of a creative preschool program with emphasis on the 
teacher's role and the acquiring of knowledge and skill in presentation 
of creative materials and guidance of experiences. 

174 



HOME ECONOMICS 

552. Child Development for Advanced Students (2). Study of the physi- 
cal and psychological development of young children at home and in 
the community. Pr. Psychology 221 or approved equivalent. Observation 
in the nursery school required. Not open to students with credit in 302. 

567. Teaching Family Life in the High School (2). Principles, methods, 
and materials. Planned primarily for teachers. Not open to students in 
graduate degree programs. 

572. Teaching Child Development in the High School (2). Principles, 
methods, and materials. Planned primarily for teachers. Not open to 
students in graduate degree programs. 

592. Contemporary Home Life (2:2). Advanced study of personal re- 
lations in the home and professional efforts for their improvement. Pr. 
302 and 412 or equivalent. 

For Graduates 

602. Problems in Child Development (2) to (4). 

612. (a) Seminar in Child Development (2) 

(b) Seminar in Family Relationships (2) 

Methods, design, and appraisal of research relating to (a) Child De- 
velopment and (b) Family Relationships. 

622. Family Life Education Workshop (2). Group participation in 
solving selected problems in Family Life Education. 

632. Infant Development (3:2:1). Principles of development, home and 
community factors, developmental testing, and research as related to 
the infant and very young child. 

642r. (a) Readings in Child Development (2) 

(b) Readings in Family Relationships (2) 

652r. Theories of Human Development (3:3). A survey of a number of 
selected theories extant in developmental literature will be made and 
each student will make a detailed, critical study of a theory or theorist 
of his choice. 

682. Current Trends in the Field of Child Development (2). 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 

For Undergraduates 

lOlr. Clothing Construction and Selection (3:1:6). Basic principles of 
construction, selection, care and management in clothing the family. 

175 



HOME ECONOMICS 

121. Clothing Selection and Construction for the Consumer (3:2:3). A 
course designed to meet the needs of those students who have had 
broad experiences in clothing construction at the high school level. 

301r. Dress Design and Construction I (3:1:6). Interrelated factors in 
fitting, flat-pattern design and clothing construction. Pr. HE 101 and 
Art 101 or approved equivalents. 

311r. Dress Design and Construction II (3:2:3). A study of aesthetic, 
psychological, and socio-economic aspects of applied clothing design. 
Pr. Art 101 and HE 101 or with consent of instructor. 

341. Textiles (3:2:3). Study of textiles from raw materials through 
manufacturing and finishing of fabrics as related to quality and per- 
formance of fabrics. 

351r. Clothing Selection and Care (3:3). Factors influencing the acqui- 
sition of clothing to include selection in relation to personal attributes, 
aspects of textiles for the consumer, and guides to satisfying buyman- 
ship and use practices. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

504. History of Costume (3:3). Historical, literary, and artistic back- 
ground of the costume of various countries from early civilization to the 
present. 

514. History of Textiles (3:3). Historical and artistic background of 
textiles of various countries from early civilization through modern 
times. 

524. Textile Technology (3:2:3). Advanced study of the chemical 
properties of fibers in relation to methods of processing fabrics and 
factors influencing serviceability. Pr. 341 or approved equivalent, and 
chemistry. 

534. Textiles in Home Furnishings (3:3). A study of the factors related 
to the raw materials, quality, performance and comparative cost of 
textiles used in home furnishings. Pr. 341 or approved equivalent. 

541. Textile Analysis (3:1:6). Advanced study of textile fibers and 
fabrics through standard testing procedures. Pr. 341, or approved equiva- 
lents, Physics or Mathematics. 

551. Clothing for the Family (3:3). Understanding of family clothing 
problems and standards of buymanship. 

561. Clothing and Textile Economics (3:3). Economic and social aspects 
of production, distribution, and utilization of clothing and textiles. 

176 



HOME ECONOMICS 

571. Advanced Clothing Construction (3:1:6). The interrelation of 
factors involved in creative clothing design through the draping method. 
Pr. 301 or approved equivalent. 

584. Contemporary Influences in Clothing Consumption (2:2). 

For Graduates 

621. Advanced Textiles (2:2). Study of current textile fibers, their use 
and care. Pr. 341 or approved equivalent. 

631. Problems in Clothing and Textiles (2) to (4). For clothing and 
textile graduate students with the approval of the instructor. 

634. Evaluation of Methods in the Construction of Clothing and House- 
hold Textiles (2:2). 

647. Materials and Methods for Teaching Clothing (2:2). Discussions, 
demonstrations, and projects planned to meet student needs. 

681. Dress Design and Construction III (3:1:6). Advanced study of 
creative dress design and construction; their relation to fashion, ma- 
terials, the human form, and accessories. Pr. 571 or approved equivalent. 

691. Problems in Tailoring (2:2). Comparative study of methods and 
techniques of tailoring; selection and construction of tailored garments. 
Pr. 301 or approved equivalent. 

694. Readings in Clothing and Textiles (2). 



FOODS AND NUTRITION 
For Undergraduates 

103r. Food Selection and Preparation (3:2:3). Standards of selection, 
purchase, preparation, storage and service of food. 

213r. Nutrition (3:3). Principles of nutrition, food preparation, and 
meal planning as related to health and efficiency. Pr. or parallel one 
year of science. 

303r. Meal Management (3:2:3). The planning, marketing, storing, 
preparing, and serving of food for family meals and special functions at 
different cost levels. Pr. 103 or approved equivalent. 

313. Nutrition and Dietetics (3:2:3). Principles of nutrition; application 
to the planning of adequate dietaries for normal individuals and family 
groups of different economic levels. Pr. or parallels, Chemistry 225 and 
326 or approved equivalents. 

177 



HOME ECONOMICS 

353r. Food Preparation and Meal Service (3:2:3). The selection, pur- 
chase, storage, and preparation of food; the planning and serving of 
meals for different occasions at varying cost levels. Planned primarily 
for other than home economics majors. 



For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

503. Experimental Food Study (3:2:3). Experimental study of factors 
regulating the preparation of standard food products. Pr. or parallels, 
103 and 303 or approved equivalent. 

533. Food Economics (2:2). Food production and distribution; markets 
and marketing; selection and storage; standardization and prices; 
utilization of foods in the home. 

563. Food Preservation (2:1:2). Comparative study of methods of food 
preservation with laboratory application, emphasizing recent develop- 
ments. Planned primarily for teachers. Not open to students in graduate 
degree programs. 

573. Diet Therapy (3:3). Modification of normal diet to meet the dietary 
requirements of pathological and special conditions. Pr. 313, Biology 277. 

583. Food Demonstration Techniques (2:1:2). Demonstration as an 
educational device; organization and execution of individual and group 
demonstrations. Pr. 303. 

593. Advanced Nutrition (3:3). Emphasis on pregnancy, infancy, child- 
hood and adolescence, old age; normal nutritional conditions. Pr. 313. 



For Graduates 

613. Readings in Foods and Nutrition (2). 

617. Management Problems in Teaching Foods (2). Food preparation 
in relation to the use of time, energy, and equipment. 

623. Current Trends in Nutrition Education (2:2). Advanced study of 
principles of nutrition and their relation to health; effective methods of 
teaching nutrition on different age levels. Pr. 213 or 313. 

643. Family Nutrition (2:2). Nutrition related to the well-being and 
needs of family members; methods of judging and appraising nutritional 
status; and practice in planning meals to meet nutritional needs. 

653. Problems in Foods and Nutrition (2) to (4). 

178 



HOME ECONOMICS 

INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

509. Quantity Cookery (3:1:6). Principles of food preparation applied 
to large quantities. Emphasis is placed on menu planning, the correct 
use and care of power equipment, cost control, and food service. Pr. 303 
or approved equivalent. 

519. Institution Management (2:2). The planning, organization, and 
administration of institution food service, personnel, and work units. 

520. Institution Marketing (2:2). Purchasing procedures, quantity buy- 
ing guides, food storage, and methods of cost control. Pr. or parallel 
103 or 303. Field trips required. 

540. School Food Service (2:1:3). Selection, purchase, preparation, and 
service of food for school lunchrooms; organization, administration, 
records and cost control applicable to school lunchrooms. 

549. Supervised Experience in Institution Management (3:0:9). Directed 
experiences in managerial problems of institution food service. Pr. 509, 
519, 520. 

For Graduates 
629. Readings in Institution Management (2). 

639. Advanced Institution Management (3:3). The furnishing, mainte- 
nance, and administration of institution housing. 

659. Advance Quantity Cookery (2:1:3). Advanced problems in the 
standardization, preparation, and cost of food on the quantity basis. 
Pr. 509 or approved equivalent. 

660. Problems in Institution Management (2) or (4). With the per- 
mission of the instructor. 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 
For Undergraduates 

307r. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in Home Economics (3:3). 
Principles of education applied to curriculum and methods of teaching 
home economics. Pr. Phychology 221 or by consent of instructor. 

467r. Supervised Teaching in Home Economics (6). Provides experi- 
ences required for certification of home economics teachers. Observation, 
teaching experience, home visiting and contacts with school and com- 
munity activities. Course completed in nine weeks. Fee $20. 



179 



HOME ECONOMICS 

478. Planning and Evaluating the Homemaking Program (2:2). Planning 
the homemaking program in secondary schools in relation to the total 
school program and the community, emphasis being given to curriculum 
development and evaluation. Course completed in nine weeks. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

507. Trends in Home Economics Education (2:2). 

508. Vocational Home Economics (2:2). Emphasis on special problems 
and philosophy of vocational homemaking programs in secondary schools. 
Planned primarily for teachers. Not open to students in graduate degree 
programs. 

518. Methods in Adult Homemaking Education (2:2). Organization; 
teaching methods and materials; evaluation. 

527. Problems in Home Economics (2) to (6). 

597. Audio- Visual Education in Home Economics (2:2). Evaluation and 
use of audio-visual materials in home economics. 

For Graduates 

637. Philosophy and Techniques of Supervision in Home Economics 
Education (2:2) or (3:3). Principles and procedures in supervision related 
to pupil and teacher growth and improvement of instructions. 

657. Evaluation in Home Economics (2:2). Basic philosophy, methods, 
and techniques. Experience in preparation of evaluation procedures. 

668. Group Work Techniques and Interpersonal Relations in the Teach- 
ing of Home Economics (2:2). Procedures recommended for improving 
interpersonal relationships between teachers, pupils, and others in school 
and community. 

677. Curriculum in Home Economics (2:2). Underlying principles of 
curriculum development and application of principles to homemaking 
programs. 

687. Guidance in Home Economics (2:2). Principles and techniques used 
in conducting conferences with pupils, especially in relation to home 
experiences. 

HOUSING AND MANAGEMENT 

For Undergraduates 

205r. The House and Its Furnishings (3:2:3). Planning and furnishing 
a livable home in relation to use, economy, beauty, and individuality. 

305r. Functional Interior Design (3:1:6). Space requirements for family 
living executed into interior designs. Pr. 205. 

180 



HOME ECONOMICS 

345r. Home Furnishings Laboratory (2:0:6). Selection, renovation, and 
construction of economical, attractive and functional home furnishings. 

355r. Planning and Furnishing the House (3:3). Planning and furnish- 
ing a livable home in relation to use, economy, beauty, and individuality. 
Primarily for other than home economics majors. 

405r. Home Management House Residence (2). Application of principles 
of management through residence in the home management house. 
Group conferences. Course completed in nine weeks. 

446r. Family Economics (2:4). The management of resources of indi- 
viduals and families in relation to human needs, goals, and values. 
Course completed in nine weeks. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

515r. Household Equipment (3:2:3). Selection, operation, care, and ar- 
rangement of household equipment in relation to family resources. Pr. 
Physics 301 or approved equivalent. 

525. Work Simplification (2:1:2). Problems of home management in 
relation to the use of time and motion. 

535. Lighting and Wiring Design (2:2). A basic study of lighting and 
wiring design for homes. Pr. Physics 301, Home Economics 515. 

536. History of Furniture (3:3). Dominant influences and characteristics 
of historical and contemporary furniture design. 

545. Family Finance (2:2). The use of financial resources in relation 
to the life cycle of the family. 

546. Seminar in Home Furnishings (2:1:1). The design, construction, 
and cost of current home furnishings related to manufacturing and 
retailing processes. Weekly field trips to representative manufacturing 
plants, retail stores and the Southern Furniture Market. By permission 
of the instructor. 

555. Housing (2:2). Economic and social factors relating to planning 
and constructing houses for family living. Pr. 205. 

556. Methods and Materials for Teaching Housing (2:2). Planned Pri- 
marily for teachers. Not open to students in graduate degree programs. 

575. Advanced Home Furnishing (3:1:6). The execution of creative 
solutions for home and commercial interior design problems. Pr. Art 101, 
H.E. 205, 305 or equivalent. 

586. Contemporary Interior Design (3:3). The designers, products and 
history of the contemporary design movement. Pr. Art 101, H.E. 205. 

181 



HOME ECONOMICS 



For Graduates 



605. Advanced Home Management (2:2). Development of procedures 
used in home management with emphasis on organization, group re- 
lations, and evaluation. 

606. Social and Economic Problems of the Family (2:2). A study of 
present-day home and family living as affected by social and economic 
factors. 

616. Problems in Family Economics and Home Management (2) to (4). 
Individual study of problems in family economics and home manage- 
ment. 

626. Readings in Family Economics and Home Management (2) to (4). 

646. Practical Problems in Home Furnishings (2). Planned primarily 
for teachers. 

665. Problems in Housing and Furnishing (2) to (4). 

675. Advanced House Planning (3:1:6). The planning of houses to meet 
the individual and group needs of families for work, leisure and rest 
from a combined functional and aesthetic viewpoint. 

685. Readings in Housing (3). 

695. Advanced Household Equipment (2:2). Intensive study of selected 
household equipment. Pr. 515, or approved equivalent. 



HONORS COURSES 1 

200, 201. Sophomore Honors Seminar. (1:2 hours every second week, 
both semesters). Required of all sophomores in the Honors Program, 
and open only to them. Staff. 

300, 301. Junior Honors Seminar (3:3, 3:3). Required of all juniors in 
the Honors Program, and open only to them. Staff. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 2 

400. Seminar in International Studies. Required for all seniors parti- 
cipating in the International Studies Program. An interdisciplinary 
seminar dealing with contemporary problems in International Politics. 
Pr. Pol. Sci. 323. Members of the International Studies Committee. 



1 For a general description of the Honors Program and a statement concerning the 
relation of Honors 200, 201, 300, and 301 see page 82, above. 

2For further details of the International Studies program see pages 80-81. 



182 



MATHEMATICS 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professors Lewis (Head of the Department) ; Instructors 
Carroll, Jones, Leaird, Saunders, Smith, Steinmetz. 

MATHEMATICS 

The courses essential to the major, which is based on 103-104 or 121, 
are 217, 218, 219, 311, 312, 318, 327, 337, 420, 430. Physics 103-104 
advised. 

1 103-104. Introduction to College Mathematics (3:3)-(3:3). Fundamental 
principles of mathematics, including a study of the number system, ele- 
mentary set theory, algebraic and trigonometric functions, and logarith- 
mic computations. Staff. 

ilOS-lOG. General Mathematics with Application to Business (3:3)- 
(3:3). Designed especially for those taking the Business Education 
course. Students taking the B.A. course will be admitted only with 
special permission from the head of the department. College Algebra 
and an introduction to statistical concepts; Mathematics of Finance, 
including such topics as annuities, amortization and sinking funds, 
bonds and depreciation. Cannot be used as the prerequisite for 217. 
(Not offered after 1963-64.) Mr. Leaird. 

1 121. College Algebra and Plane Trigonometry (3:3). Advanced topics in 
college algebra; plane trigonometry. Limited to students with superior 
high school preparation in mathematics. Pr. 4 units of high school 
mathematics, including advanced algebra and trigonometry. Miss Carroll, 
Miss Lewis. 

201. Principles of Business Mathematics (3:3). Some topics from 
college algebra, simple and compound interest, annuities, sinking funds, 
depreciation, inequalities, logarithms, linear programming, inventory 
control, elementary properties of matrices, and basic computer concepts. 
Designed primarily for Business Education majors. Students taking the 
B.A. course will be admitted only with the special permission of the 
department head. A student may not receive credit for both 103-104 and 
201. Staff. 

217r. Analytic Geometry (3:3). Pr. 103-104 or 121 or the equivalent. 
Miss Lewis, Mrs. Smith. 

218r, 219r. Calculus I, II (3:3), (3:3). A two semester sequence in 
integrated differential and integral calculus. Pr. 217. Staff. 



*A student may receive credit for only one of 103-104, 105-106, 121. 

183 



MATHEMATICS 

301, 302. Number Systems, Algebra and Geometry (3:3), (3:3). An 
intuitive development of the real number system with emphasis on arith- 
metic properties; elementary set theory, basic concepts of algebra and 
informal geometry. A junior or senior elective for students who have 
not taken Math 103-104 or equivalent. 301 is prerequisite for 302. 
Designed primarily for prospective elementary teachers. Mr. Jones, Mrs. 
Saunders, Mrs. Smith. 

311, 312. Introduction to Modern Algebra I, II (3:3), (3:3). An investi- 
gation of algebraic structures by means of an introduction to the theory 
of groups, rings, integral domains and fields, including basic properties 
of polynomials; an elementary approach to vector spaces and linear 
systems, determinants, matrices and linear transformations. Pr. 218 
or consent of instructor. Mr. Jones, Miss Lewis. 

31 8r. Calculus III (3:3). The third semester in the calculus sequence 
begun in Calculus I, II. Includes infinite series, functions of several 
variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals. Pr. 219. Staff. 

327r. Differential and Integral Calculus (3:3). Integral calculus, includ- 
ing techniques of integration, the Fundamental Theorem and its applica- 
tions, and infinite series. Pr. 218. Mr. Leaird, Miss Lewis, Mr. Steinmetz. 
328. Advanced Analytic Geometry (3:3). Pr. 218. Mr. Leaird. 

337. History of Mathematics (2:2). Pr. 218. Mr. Leaird. 

1 341. Fundamental Concepts of Statistics (3:3). An introductory course 
for either mathematics majors or students in other departments. Em- 
phasizes the logic of statistical inference rather than either mathe- 
matical proof or computational routines. Includes simple linear correla- 
tion, regression, and contingency as well as tests of hypotheses and con- 
fidence intervals based on the hypergeometric, binominal, normal, or 
t distribution. Pr. 218. Mr. Leaird. 

420. Foundations of Geometry (3:3). Pr. 312 or consent of the instruc- 
tor. Mr. Jones. 

430. Advanced Calculus (3:3). Pr. 318. Miss Lewis. 

432. Differential Equations (3:3). Pr. 219. Mr. Schmidt. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). Staff. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

1 541. Statistical Methods for Research (3:3). A brief course for gradu- 
ate or advanced undergraduate students with little or no college mathe- 
matics but with a serious interest in some field of science. Primarily 
concerned with inductive statistical methods but also includes the basic 
concepts and techniques of descriptive statistics. 



iA student may receive credit for only one of 341, 541. 

184 



MATHEMATICS 

542. Selected Topics in Statistics (3:3). Analysis of variance and co- 
variance. Multiple and partial correlation, multiple and curvilinear re- 
gression. Rank correlation and other non-parametric methods. Pr. 341 
or 541 or permission of the instructor. 

593, 594. Directed Study in Mathematics (3), (3). Individual study in 
an appropriate area of mathematics, directed through regular confer- 
ences with the instructor. Pr. Permission of the department head. 

600a. Number Systems (2). A course in the basic concepts of sets and 
numbers for teachers of junior high school mathematics. A study of 
the real number system with emphasis on the arithmetic properties; 
elementary set theory; base systems and algorithms. Designed to meet 
the needs of teachers of pre-algebra and terminal mathematics courses 
of grades 7-9. No prerequisites in college mathematics. Mr. Jones. 

600b. Basic Concepts of Algebra and Informal Geometry (2). Designed 
for teachers of junior high school mathematics. Fundamental properties 
of plane and spacial configurations; area and volume measurement; 
similarity and congruence. Inequalities and equations; relations and 
functions. 600a or consent of instructor. Mr. Jones. 

601a. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics with Special Reference 
to Algebra (2:2). Such basic concepts as the theory of sets, mappings, 
number systems, and algebraic structures. Topics in groups, rings, and 
fields will be selected from modern algebra as they have particular 
relevance to high school algebra. Pr., one semester each of analytic 
geometry and calculus, or consent of the instructor. 

601b. Fundamental Concepts of Geometry (2:2). Deductive reasoning in 
Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometries, introduction to projec- 
tive geometry, topics from elementary topology. Pr., one semester each 
of analytic geometry and calculus, or consent of instructor. 

ASTRONOMY 

101. Introduction to Astronomy (3:3). An elementary appreciation 
course designed to enlarge the student's horizon and to give her a per- 
manent and enjoyable out-of-doors interest. Although the course lays 
emphasis upon the constellations and their stories and upon the bodies 
in the solar system, it also attempts to give the student some sense of 
the universe as a vast and ordered whole, and of our place in this uni- 
verse. A three-inch telescope and a small electrically diven planetarium 
used for demonstration purposes. Designed primarily as a freshman 
elective. Cannot be used to fulfill science requirements for graduation. 
Mr. Steinmetz. 

185 



MUSIC 

310. Elementary Descriptive Astronomy (3:3). An outline of the basic 
facts in astronomy and its history, with constellation study. Designed 
for those interested in the cultural side of science and for prospective 
teachers of general science. No prerequisite in college mathematics; 
cannot be used to fulfill the science requirement for graduation. Elective 
for juniors and seniors and approved sophomores. A student may not 
receive credit for both 101 and 310. Mr. Steinmetz. 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Lee Rigsby, Dean 

Professors Hollo way, Rigsby, Thompson; Associate Pro- 
fessors Cowling, Darnell, DeVeny, Dickieson, P. Morgan ; 
Assistant Professors Atkisson, Cox, Hickfang, Luce, I. Mor- 
gan, Wilson ; Instructors Brett, Cousins, Hilbrink, LaMar, 
Meacham, Shipman; Lecturer Ericourt; Graduate Assist- 
ants Bourne, Cofield, Ferrell, Gift, Hearn, Heidemann, 
Lynam, McNeely, Riley. 

The School of Music offers curricula leading to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Arts with major in music, the Master of 
Education in Music Education and Master of Music in Applied Music. 

The School of Music is a member of the National Association of 
Schools of Music. The requirements for entrance and graduation as 
set forth in this catalogue are in accordance with the published regula- 
tions of the National Association of Schools of Music. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 
THEORY AND COMPOSITION 

101, 102. Theory I, II (3:3), (3:3). A course in the fundamentals of 
music with special emphasis on part-writing techniques and principles. 

103, 104. Sight Singing and Dictation I, II (1:2), (1:2). A concentrated 
drill in the techniques and principles of aural musicianship. 

201, 202. Theory III, IV (3:3), (3:3). A continuation of Theory I, II. 
Special emphasis on chromatic harmony and composition in smaller 
forms. 

202. Sight Singing and Dictation III (1:2). A continuation of Sight 
Singing and Dictation I, II. 



186 



MUSIC 

204. Keyboard Harmony (1:2). Application of the techniques and 
principles of written harmony to the keyboard. Special emphasis on 
modulation, improvisation, and figured-bass realization. 

205, 206. Composition I, II (3:3), (3:3). Creative writing in the smaller 
forms. 

301. Counterpoint (3:3). A study of contrapuntal forms and techniques. 

302. Form and Analysis (3:3). A study of musical form with special 
emphasis on the structural procedures of 18th, 19th and 20th century 
compositions. 

303. 304. Orchestration I, II (2:2), (2:2). Ranges and tonal possibili- 
ties of all instruments and analysis of scores. 

305, 306. Composition III, IV (3:3), (3:3). Continuation of 206. 

401. Twentieth-Century Musical Idioms (2:2). Specialized study of 
contemporary styles and idioms. 

403, 404. Advanced Contrapuntal Writing (3:3), (3:3). 

405, 406. Composition V, VI (3:3), (3:3). Continuation of 306. 

493. Honors Work 

MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

All Music History and Literature courses are open to nonmusic 
majors with the consent of the instructor. 

141r. Music Appreciation (3:3). An introduction to the literature of 
music. No musical background is necessary. 

331, 332. History of Music I, II (3:3), (3:3). Detailed study of music 
history. First semester: History of Music to about 1600; second semes- 
ter: History of Music from 1600 to the present. Pr. 141, 341, or 102. 

338. History of Organ Literature (2:2). Second Semester, 1964-65. 

341r. Music Appreciation (3:3). Designed particularly for junior and 
senior nonmusic majors. No musical background necessary. Not open 
for credit to those who have had 141r. 

342. Music Appreciation, Twentieth Century (3:3). Designed particu- 
larly for junior and senior nonmusic majors. No musical background 
is necessary. 

368. Church Music Organization (2:2). Organization and training of 
church choirs; technique of conducting from the organ. (Offered second 
semester 1963-64, and in alternate years thereafter.) 

187 



MUSIC 

431, 432. History of Music III, IV (2:2), (2:2). Further studies in 
the area of Music History and Literature. Emphasis upon the evolution 
of musical styles and thought in the western world. Pr. 331, 332. 

447, 448. Individual Study in Music History and Literature (2), (2) 
or (3), (3). Directed study in reading and research in specialized areas 
of Music History and Literature. 

463, 464. Liturgical Music Internship (3:3), (3:3). Supervised work in 
the various duties and responsibilities of a choirmaster. 

493. Honors Work 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

161, 162. Class Strings I, II (2:4), (2:4). Class instruction in all stringed 
instruments. 

163, 164. Class Woodwinds and Brasses (2:4), (2:4). First semester: 
class instruction in all woodwind instruments; second semester: class 
instruction in all brass instruments. 

165. Class Percussion (1:1). Class instruction in all percussion instru- 
ments. 

361, 362. Public School Music (3:3), (3:3). First semester: emphasis 
on music fundamentals and methods for primary grades; second 
semester: Methods and materials for intermediate and upper grades. 

363, 364. Curriculum and Teaching Methods in Elementary and Secon- 
dary Schools (3:3), (3:3). First semester: principles, materials and pro- 
cedures for elementary grades; second semester: junior and senior high 
schools. 

365, 366. Piano Methods and Materials (3:3), (3:3). Study of funda- 
mental teaching materials and their application. 

461, 462. Piano Student Teaching (3:3), (3:3). Daily teaching of 
children under faculty supervision. 

465, 466. Student Teaching (3:3), (3:3). Daily teaching in primary and 
secondary grades under faculty supervision. Prerequisite Music 363-364. 
Fee $10. 

493. Honors Work 

All students majoring in general music education must complete one 
semester of functional piano. 



188 



MUSIC 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

539ab. Advanced Conducting (2:2), (2:2). Advanced score reading. 
Conducting of works in larger forms, with detailed criticism of con- 
ducting technique in its relation to content of the score. Prerequisite or 
co-requisite for 539a: at least one year of college choral ensemble 
participation. 

541. Music for Classroom Teachers (2:2). Review of fundamentals 
of music with special emphasis on methods of teaching music in grades 
1-6. Music literature for use in elementary schools reviewed and 
discussed. 

542. Music in Our World Today (2:2). Designed especially for the 
teacher of the general music class, both elementary and secondary 
public school. Subject matter covers music in recreation; music in 
religion; folk music of this and other lands; music in relation to the 
other arts. 

544. Psychology of Music (2:2). An examination of music as an art 
and a science with special attention to the psychological processes upon 
which music appreciation depends. 

545. Pedagogy of Music Theory (2:2). The techniques, methods, and 
materials involved in the teaching of Music Theory on high school and 
college levels. 

547, 548. Individual Study in Music History and Literature (2:2), (2:2). 
A directed study in reading and research in specialized areas of Music 
History and Literature. 

559. Projects in Music Education (2:2). Special studies in the field 
of Music Education. Designed primarily to meet the problems of the 
general classroom teacher of the elementary and secondary grades. 

561. Arranging for School Bands, Orchestras, and Choruses (2:2). 
Principles of orchestration and choral arranging with special attention 
to the limitations and problems of typical elementary and secondary 
school ensembles. 

565. Principles of Choral Singing (2:2). A course for choral directors 
and singers, dealing with four principal aspects of choral singing: tone, 
diction, style, and artistry. Designed for teachers in service. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

The graduate student in music may work toward the Master of 
Education degree with major in Music Education or the Master of Music 



189 



MUSIC 

in Applied Music. For further information on this program, consult the 
graduate section of the catalogue or write to the Dean of the School 
of Music. 

601, 602. Seminar in Music Research (2:2), (2:2). Introduction to the 
methods and materials used in music research. 

647, 648. Individual Study in Music History and Literature (2:2), 
(2:2). A directed study in reading and research in specialized area of 
Music History and Literature. 

650, 651. Seminar in Music Education (2:2), (2:2). A study of current 
philosophy, practices and trends in the field of music education; its 
challenges in dealing wih elementary and secondary students and its 
opportunities in the community. Each student will do research in a 
subject of her own choice. 

652. Music Administration and Supervision (2:2). A detailed accounting 
of the many facets of school music administration and the problems 
and responsibilities pertaining thereto. 

694. Thesis (4). Individual guidance in the development of a specific 
research problem. Required of all applicants for the Master's Degree 
in Education with major in Music Education. 

ENSEMBLES 

All ensembles are open to any college student with permission of 
the director. 

180ab. University Choir ( % :3 ) , ( V 2 :3 ) . 

181ab. University Glee Club ( % :2), ( % :2) . 

182ab. University Chorale ( 1 :3 ) , ( 1 :3 ) . 

190ab. Greensboro Symphony Orchestra (%:2), (%:2). 

191ab. University Sinfonia (1:3), (1:3). 

192ab. University Band ( % :2) , ( V 2 :2) . 

196ab. University Ensemble (1:2), (1:2). 

380ab. University Choir (1:3), (1:3). 

APPLIED MUSIC 

170, 171. Diction for Singers I and II (3:3), (3:3). First semester: a 
study of phonetics and their application to the pronunciation of English, 
Italian, and ecclesiastical Latin. A study of the special problems in- 

190 



MUSIC 

volved in singing in English; Second semester: a study of the phonetic 
alphabet as it relates to French and German and of the special problems 
involved in the singing of these languages. 

371, 372. Conducting I, II (2:2), (2:2). First semester: emphasis on 
choral direction; second semester: emphasis on orchestral conducting. 
Co-requisite for 371 : College Choir or College Chorale. 

375, 376. Opera Workshop I, II (3:2:3), (3:2:3). Techniques of singing 
in opera and oratorio with actual participation in School of Music 
performances. Open to any college student with the permission of 
the director. 

473, 474. Accompanying (1:2), (1:2). Accompanying of vocal and 
instrumental performers under faculty supervision. 

475, 476. Opera Workshop III, IV (3:2:3), (3:2:3). Continuation of 376. 

All entering students who plan to major in applied music must pass 
a placement examination. Students not majoring in music who wish 
to earn credit in applied music must also pass an examination or take 
applied music without credit. 

Private music instruction is offered in piano, organ, voice, and all 
orchestral and band instruments. All lessons are one hour each week 
or two %-hour lessons each week plus required practice time. 



Iredit 


Freshmen 


Sophomores 


Juniors 


Seniors 


Graduates 





150 a,b 


250 a,b 


350 a,b 


450 a,b 


550 a,b 




1,1 


151,152* 


251,252* 


351,352 


451,452 


551,552 




2,2 


153,154* 


253,254* 


353,354 


453,454 


553,554 


653,654 


3,3 


155,156 


255,256 


355,356 


455,456 


555,556 


655,656 


4,4 


157,158 


257,258 


357,358 


457,458 


557,558 


657,658 


5,5 


159,160 


259,260 


359,360 


459,460 


559,560 


659,660 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

The list of requirements in applied music as outlined below is for the 
guidance of the student majoring in applied music (Bachelor of Music), 
and is a flexible rather than a rigid description of requirements. How- 
ever, a student must complete one level each semester. 

For a student studying applied music as a secondary area in her 
major, the requirements are outlined by her teacher according to the 
needs of the student's major field of study. 



♦These courses may be designated a and b, and extended through two semesters. 

191 



MUSIC 



Piano Course 



Entrance Requirements: Major and minor scales and arpeggios at 
moderate tempi; Etudes, such as Czerny 299; Heller Op. 47; Little Prel- 
udes and Fugues, Bach; easier Two-part Inventions, Bach; compositions 
by standard composers equivalent in difficulty to Mozart, Sonata in C 
Major, No. 3; Haydn, Sonata in C minor, No. 11; Beethoven, Sonata 
Op. 49, No. 2. 

Freshman Year: Major and minor scales M.M. 108. Major and minor, 
dominant seventh and diminished seventh arpeggios. M.M. 72; trill, one, 
two, four, eight notes, M.M. 60; legato and staccato octaves at moderate 
speed. Czerny, Op. 29 and Cramer; Bach, Two-part Inventions, early 
sonatas of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, compositions of equal difficulty 
from romantic and modern schools. 

Sophomore Year: Scale M.M. 132. Cramer: Czerny Op. 740; Bach, 
Three-part Inventions; easier dance movements from French suites; 
Beethoven Sonatas Op. 14, No. 1; Op. 14, No. 2; romantic and modern 
compositions. 

Junior Year: Major and minor scales M.M. 144; scales in thirds, 
sixths, tenths, M.M. 132; Czerney, Op. 740; Clementi, Gradus and 
Parnassum; French and English suites; easier preludes and fugues 
from W. T. C, Bach; more difficult Beethoven sonatas; compositions by 
Schumann, Schubert, Chopin, Brahms, Liszt, Debussy, Bartok, and other 
contemporary composers. 

Senior Year: Bach, preludes and fugues from W. T. C; Chopin 
Etudes, a wide repertoire embracing a sonata, concerto, and pieces by 
classic, romantic, and modern composers. Graduation recital appearance. 

Voice Course 

Freshman Year: Voice classification. Tone production and diction 
study. Song literature from the Italian operatic and oratorio repertoire 
of the seventeenth century. Study of Old English classics. 

Sophomore Year: Emphasis on development of legato singing and 
flexibility as elements of technique. Choice of song literature determined 
in large measure by state of development in the use of foreign lan- 
guages. 

Junior Year: Emphasis on vocal agility, volume, range and quality 
of tone. In addition to study of more advanced works in foreign lan- 
guages, modern American and English songs are given increased 
attention. Operatic and oratorio arias required at this stage of de- 
velopment. 

192 



MUSIC 

Senior Year: The main emphasis is upon the interpretive aspects 
of singing and development of the student's capacity to sing with style 
and distinction. The repertoire is general and is governed by special 
capabilities of the student. A graduation recital appearance is required. 

Violin Course 

Entrance Requirements: The student should be able to pursue to her 
advantage the study of the 42 Etudes of Kreutzer. A previous thorough 
study of the Kayser Op. 20, the Mazas Special Studies, and the Dont 
Exercises Preparatory to Kreutzer is recommended. 

Freshman Year: Careful review of previous technical study. Sevcik 
trill studies. Kreutzer Etudes. Three octave scales and arpeggios. Con- 
certos of Bach, Viotti. 

Sophomore Year: Kreutzer and Fiorillo etudes, double stop studies. 
Concertos, Spohr, No. 2; Viotti, No. 22. 

Junior Year: Rode Caprices. Concertos, Bruch, Mendelssohn; sonatas, 
Tartini and Corelli. 

Senior Year: Bach solo sonatas. Selected great concertos and sonatas. 
Smaller modern works. Graduation recital appearance. 

Violoncello Course 

Entrance Requirements: Major and minor scales in two octaves; 
ability to play musically the Corelli Sonata in D minor, or a classic 
work of similar type; technical ability to play the Goltermann Concerto 
No. 4 or the equivalent. The student should be in a position to pursue 
to her advantage the course for the freshman year outlined below. 

Freshman Year: Major and minor scales in three octaves; scales in 
broken thirds and arpeggios (Klengel, Technical Studies, Vol. I) Lee 
Op. 31 Book II; Dotzauer, 113 Exercises for Violoncello, Book II. Bach 
Suite I in G Major. Sonatas by Corelli, Eccles, Handel, Marcello. Pieces 
by Bach, Goltermann, Popper, etc. 

Sophomore Year: Major and minor scales in four octaves; scales in 
thirds and arpeggios. Merk, Op. 11; Dupont, 21 Etudes; Grutzmacher, 
Op. 38, Book I. Bach, Suite II in D minor. Sonatas by Sammartini, 
Mozart, Cassado, Beethoven (Op. 5, No. 1 or 2), Mendelssohn, Strauss. 
Boellmann, Symphonic Variations. Pieces by Bach, Faure, Guerini, 
Mendelssohn (Op. 17) Saint-Saens, etc. 

Junior Year: Major and minor scales in sixth, octaves and double 
stops. Grutzmacher, Op. 38, Book II; Franchomme, Op. 7; Piatti, Op. 
25. Bach, Suite III in C major. Sonatas by Beethoven (Op. 69), Grieg, 

193 



MUSIC 

Rachmaninoff. Concertos by Boccherini and d'Albert, Lalo or Saint- 
Saens. Pieces by Bach, Bloch, Granados, Senaille, Schumann (Op. 70, 
73, or 102), etc. 

Senior Year: Major and minor scales with spiccato and other special 
bowings. Orchestral studies, Bach, Suite IV in E-flat major or Suite V 
in C minor, Sonatas by Beethoven (Op. 102, No. 1 or 2), Brahms (Op. 
38), Debussy, Delius. Concertos by Haydn and Elgar or Schumann. 
Pieces by Bach, Beethoven (Variations), Bloch, Cassado, Chopin (Op. 
3), Dvorak, etc. Graduation recital appearance. 

Organ Course 

Freshman and Sophomore Years. Prerequisite for study in the organ 
department is a sufficient piano technique, equivalent to the freshman 
requirements in Piano of this University. Students may be required to 
continue piano at the discretion of the teacher. If accepted, the student 
must show technical and musical development in the performance of the 
easier organ Chorales and Preludes and Fugues of Bach, the works of 
pre-Bach composers, the Chorale-Preludes of Brahms, and selected works 
by composers of the romantic and contemporary periods. 

Junior and Senior Years: The student is expected to perform com- 
positions selected from the larger works of Bach and pre-Bach com- 
posers, the works of Franck, and compositions by Langlais, Sowerby, 
Schroeder, Pepping, Alain, and others. A recital appearance is required 
in both the junior and senior years of study. 

Wind Instrument Course 

Flute 

Entrance Requirements: Major, harmonic minor and chromatic 
scales in one-octave patterns. Ability to play Handel Sonata No. II 
or a work of equal difficulty. 

Freshman Year: Major, minor and chromatic scales in two-octave 
patterns from all degrees of the scales. Daily exercises of Andre 
Maquarre. Studies of Andersen; Op. 30, Op. 63 and Op. 21. Studies of 
Koehler Op. 33, Book II. Literature: Sonatas I-VII by Handel, Sonatas 
I-IV by Telemann, Sonata in F Major by Marcello, Chanson et 
Badinerie by Camus, Fantasie Op. 79 by Faure and Cantabile and Presto 
by Enesco. 

Sophomore Year: Continuation of Maquarre Daily Studies and scale 
studies begun in the Freshman year. Studies of Andersen Op. 15; 
Koehler Op. 33 (Book III); Sousmann Book III. Literature: Sonatas by 

194 



MUSIC 

J. S. Bach (I-VI), Poulenc, Locatelli. Concerti by Jacob, Quantz and 
Vivaldi. Sicilienne et Burlesque by Casella, Night Soliloquy by Kennan 

Junior Year. Continued scale studies. Daily Studies of Reichert. 
Studies of Andersen Op. 60; Jean jean — Etudes Modernes. Literature: 
Concerti by Mozart; Sonatas by Hindemith, Piston, Ibert and Bitsch; 
Suites by J. S. Bach and Telemann; Poem by Griffes. Orchestral studies. 

Senior Year: Continued technical work with special emphasis on the 
use of chord patterns in all major and minor keys. Continuation of 
Reichert Daily Studies. Studies of Karg-Elert Op. 107 (The Modern 
Flutist); Koehler Virtuoso Studies. Literature: Sonata by Prokofieff, 
Sonatine by Dutilleux, Ballade by Martin, Theme and Variations by 
Schubert and Concerti by Ibert, Leclair, Gretry and Boccherini. Con- 
tinuation of orchestral studies. The study of chamber ensembles; 
Beethoven Trio, Mozart Quartets, Debussy Trio, etc. 

Oboe 

Freshman Year: Scale arpeggio studies. Studies by Ferling, Brod, 
Barret. Literature: Sonatas — Handel; six partitas — Telemann. 

Sophomore Year: Studies: Lamotte, Gillet. Literature: Three Ro- 
mances — Schumann; Piece in G minor — Pierne; Fantaisie, Op. 71 — 
d'Indy. 

Junior Year: Studies: Gillet, Prestini, Loyon. Literature: Concerto 
(M major) — Mozart. Concerto — Ralph Vaughan Williams; Sonata — 
Hindemith; Quartets — Mozart and Stamitz. 

Senior Year: Studies: Singer, Orchestral studies: Literature: Con- 
certo grossi Nos. 8, 9 and 10 — Handel. Concerto in D minor — Marcello. 

Clarinet 

Freshman Year: Studies: Rose and Langenus; scale studies — Lan- 
genus. Literature: Weber — Concertino; appropriate Paris Conservatoire 
solos. 

Sophomore Year: Studies: Rose and Langenus (continued). Litera- 
ture; appropriate Paris Conservatoire solos; Weber — Fantasy and 
Rondo, Grand Duo Concertante. 

Junior Year: Largenus, Polatschek, Jeanjean, orchestral studies. 
Literature: Sonatas — Hindemith, Bax; Trio (with piano and viola) 
Mozart. 

Senior Year: Advanced studies and study of the most important 
chamber works in the clarinet literature; e.g., the sonatas of Brahms. 
Op. 120, Nos. 1 and 2. The Trio, Op. 114 and quintet, Op. 115, by 
Brahms. The quintet of Max Reger; the Rhapsody of Debussy, etc. 

195 



MUSIC 



Bassoon 



Freshman Year: Scale and arpeggio studies; studies by Weissenborn. 
Literature: Sonatas — Gaillard; appropriate Paris Conservatoire solos. 

Sophomore Year: Weissenborn studies continued; studies by Gam- 
baro. Appropriate Paris Conservatoire pieces. 

Junior Year: Studies: Jancourt, Orchestral studies. Literature; 
Sonatas — Hindemith and Saint-Saens; Paris Conservatoire solos. 

Senior Year: Advanced technical studies. Orchestral studies. Further 
studies of the literature of the bassoon, including the Mozart Concerto. 

Trumpet 

Freshman Year: Instrumental techniques, scales, arpeggios, and 
studies from Arban, Laurent (Book I) and others. 

Sophomore Year: More extended work in Arban, Laurent, Chavannes 
(Characteristic Studies) and Maxime-Alphonse. Transposition. 

Junior Year. Study of the more advanced etudes of St. Jocome, 
Chavannes, Petit, Maxime-Alphonse, etc. 

Senior Year: Advanced work covering a variety of studies, solos and 
orchestral passages. 

French Horn 

Freshman Year: Techniques, scales, and arpeggios. Etudes from 
Koppraseh, Maxime-Alphonse, Arban; and other suitable studies. Ele- 
mentary transposition. 

Sophomore Year: Transposition. Mozart Concertos, Maxime-Alphonse 
(Book IV) and solos and studies of similar difficulty. 

Junior Year: Orchestral studies, Maxime-Alphonse (Book V) Gallay 
(Unmeasured Preludes) or the equivalent. 

Senior Year: Haydn Concertos (I and II), Orchestral studies cover- 
ing as much of the entire range of orchestral styles as possible. Belloli 
and other advanced studies. 

Trombone (Baritone) 

Freshman Year: Techniques, scales, arpeggios, songs, etudes, studies 
and solos of a suitable character. Development of the trombone style. 

Sophomore Year: Reading in the various clefs. Lafosse (Book I), 
Rochut, and others. 

196 



NURSING 

Junior Year: Lafosse (Book I and II), Rochut, Borclogni, and simi- 
lar studies of a more advanced nature. 

Senior Year. Advanced studies: Couillaud, Lafosse, etc. Orchestral 
studies. 

RECITALS 

All music majors are required to attend all faculty and student 
recitals, and concerts given by School of Music choral and instrumental 
ensembles. 

All music majors are required to attend the weekly student recitals 
given in the Recital Hall and are required to take part in these recitals 
when requested to do so. 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION 

Boehret (Head of the Department and Assistant Pro- 
fessor) ; Instructors Cherry, Huebner, Galer, Korn. 

The Department of Nursing Education offers a two-year program at 
Woman's College and Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital. A six-week 
summer session in Psychiatric Nursing at John Umstead Hospital at 
Butner, N. C. follows the first year of academic work. The two years 
of academic work at the college are followed by a four-month practicum 
for which a salary is paid. Students are eligible to take the Registered 
Nurse Licensing Examination. Admission requirements and tuition fees 
are the same as for all students in the college. Graduation exercises 
■are held upon completion of the practicum. 

101. Fundamentals of Nursing (6:4:6). An approach to nursing care 
through a knowledge and understanding of the well person; designed to 
develop technical skills, concepts, attitudes and understandings essential 
to total nursing care; integrates ethics, normal nutrition, history of 
nursing, and pharmacology. Miss Korn and Staff. 

102. Maternal and Child Care (4:2:6). Developmental approach includ- 
ing theory and practice necessary to give knowledge and skills in the 
care of mothers and children; integrates ethics, diet therapy, history 
of nursing, and pharmacology. Pr. 101. Miss Huebner and Staff. 

sl50. Psychiatric Nursing (6:5:20). S.S. hours of week different at 
John Umstead Hospital, Butner, N. C. Preparation to function in pre- 
vention of mental illness, care, treatment and rehabilitation of mentally 
ill; integrates ethics, diet therapy, history of nursing, and pharmacology. 
Pr. 101, 102. Visiting Lecturer. 

197 



PHILOSOPHY 

201, 202. Medical and Surgical Nursing (9:5:12), (9:5:12). Empha- 
sizes inter-relations of social, psychological, dietary, medical surgical 
nursing problems; the implications of common medical-surgical con- 
ditions of the chronically and acutely ill, the child, the adult and the 
geriatric patient; integrates ethics, diet therapy, trends in nursing, 
pharmacology. Pr. 101, 102, sl50, 201. Miss Galer and Staff. 

Second Year 

Semester 
Courses 1st 2nd 

Sociology 211 1 3 

Psychology 224 1 3 

Nursing 201-202 9 9 

Physical Education 1 V 2 % 

Elective 3 3 



First Year 






Semester 


Courses 


1st 2nd 


English 101-1021 


. 3 3 


Psychology 221 1 

Chemistry 201 1 

Biology 103-104 1 

Nursing 101-102 

Physical Education 1 
Home Economics 302r . 


. 3 

3 

. 3 3 
. 6 4 

. y 2 v 2 

3 



Total sem. hrs 15 V 2 15 V 2 



Total sem. hrs 15% 16% 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Ashby (Head of the Deparment) ; Assistant 
Professor Rosthal. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Philosophy 211, 311 and 312 are required in the major program. 
111. Introduction to Philosophy (3:3). An introduction to philosophy 
through consideration of the lives and ideas of leading contemporary 
thinkers; examination of the historical origins of their thought. 

211. Introduction to Logic (3:3). An introduction to the principles of 
argument and proof, deductive and inductive. Fallacies, definition, 
validity. Attention to the theory of language and to the nature of 
scientific method. 

221r. Introduction to Ethics (3:3). An analysis of the nature of ethics; 
a critical survey of the major Western ethical systems and an examina- 
tion of some contemporary problems. 

311. History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3:3). Ethics, theories 
of knowledge, and metaphysics in the ancient and medieval periods. 
Readings in the principal writings of Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, Au- 
gustine, and Aquinas. 



iA student transferring to a four-year degree program in the college may use these 
courses for credit. 



198 



PHYSICS 

312. History of Modern Philosophy (3:3). A survey of modern philo- 
sophical thought, Descartes to Dewey. 

321. Contemporary Ethical Thought (3:3). Analysis of the meaning 
of moral concepts such as good, right, ought, duty, and of the nature 
of ethical argument, with particular attention to present-day theories 
of ethics, both cognitive and non-cognitive, such as intuitionism, natural- 
ism, emotivism. 

322. Aesthetics (3:3). Philosophical problems connected with the de- 
scription, interpretation and evaluation of the arts. 

323r. Philosophy of Religion (3:3). A study of philosophic interpreta- 
tions of religion with major attention given to significant problems in 
contemporary religions of Western civilization. 

341. Recent American Philosophy (3:3). Recent American Philosophy 
since about 1900. Pierce, James, Royce, Santayana, Whitehead, Dewey. 

347. Contemporary Philosophy: Analytical Philosophy (3:3). Contempo- 
rary techniques of philosophical analysis: the nature of analysis, per- 
ceptual knowledge, meaning and verification and other selected topics. 

348. Contemporary Philosophy: Philosophies of Existence and Phe- 
nomenology (3:3). Contemporary developments in continental philosophy. 
Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Jaspers, Sartre, Marcel. 

401, 402. Reading Course for Seniors (3:3). Supervised reading and re- 
search for students who fulfill requirements for the major in philosophy. 
With consent of instructor. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

690. Aesthetics (3:3). Reading and reports of the major philosophies 
of art, analyses of artistic categories, and development of personal 
aesthetic theories. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Professor Reardon (Head of the Department) ; Instructor 
Gardner ; Laboratory Assistant Waynick. 

101-102. General Physics (4:3:3)-(4:3:3). Introduction to laws and 
properties of matter, sound, heat, optics, electricity and magnetism. 
Algebra and trigonometry used in the development of this material. 

103-104. General Physics (4:3:3)-(4:3:3). A more rigorous introduction 
to the fundamental principles of physics as found in mechanics, sound, 
heat, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Pr. Math. 103-104 or 121 
or the equivalent. 



199 



PHYSICS 

1 201r. Fundamental Principles of Physics (3:2:3). A one semester in- 
troduction to the fundamentals in the field of physics. It may be 
elected by students who have not received credit for Physics 101-102, 
103-104 or 301. 

1 209r. Photography (3:1:6). Scientific study of equipment and tech- 
niques used in photography. Special attention given to scientific and 
artistic conditions needed to portray photographically an original. Stu- 
dents must purchase films and papers. 

301r. Physics (3:2:3). Emphasizes features in physics having greatest 
application in everyday life. Required of Teacher Training, Food and 
Nutrition, Housing majors for Bachelors of Science in Home Economics 
unless 101-102 or 103-104 substituted. Open to other students subject 
to approval of department and class chairman. 

310. Advanced Photography (3:1:6). Continuation of 209. Emphasis 
placed on special techniques used in research laboratory, also field of 
art. Work with special types of film, including color. Students must 
purchase films and papers. Pr. 209. 

320. Sound (3:2:3). Advanced course including wave motion, reflection, 
refraction, interference, diffraction, and other acoustical phenomena. Pr. 
101-102 or 103-104. 

321. Light (3:2:3). Advanced course including nature of light, inter- 
ference, dispersion, spectra, optical instruments, and other optical phe- 
nomena. Pr. 101-102 or 103-104. 

323. Heat (3:2:3). Advanced course in theory of heat including some 
work in thermodynamics. Pr. 101-102 or 103-104 and Math. 103-104 or 
their equivalents. 

324. Mechanics (3:2:3). Advanced course in theoretical mechanics with 
laboratory. Pr. 101-102 or 103-104 and Math. 103-104 or 121 or their 
equivalents. 

331, 332. Experimental Physics (1:0:3), (1:0:3). Advanced courses in 
laboratory techniques as involved, in special laboratory problems. Pr. 
two advanced courses in physics which are being taken concurrently or 
have been completed. 

333, 334. Electricity and Magnetism (3:2:3), (3:2:3). Advanced course 
in electrical and magnetic theory and instruments including d.c. and a.c. 
circuitry and electromagnetic phenomena. 

335. Electronics (3:2:3). Fundamentals of high vacuum and gaseous 
electron tubes, solid state devices and electronic circuits useful for 
reproduction, measurement and control. 



1 This course cannot be used to fulfill the science requirements for graduation. 

200 



450. Modern Physics (3:3). Brief survey of fundamental laws; study of 
modern theories of matter, electricity,, and radiation. Required of all 
seniors majoring in physics. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). 

601a. Basic Concepts in Physics (2). Course designed to study the 
fundamental concepts and theories in the field of physics which are 
needed by the high school physics teacher. Prerequisites: one year of 
college physics, one year of college mathematics, or consent of the 
instructor. 

601b. Selected Topics in Physics (2). Course designed to study current 
theories and recent developments in modern physics. The following 
topics will be some of those considered: atomic structure, wave theory, 
fundamental particles, radiation, spectra, electronics. Prerequisites: 
Physics 601a or its equivalent. 

602a. Selected Topics in Physics (2). Study of motion from the dy- 
namical point of view as presented in the Physical Science Study Com- 
mittee physics course. Prerequisites: Physics 601a and b or the 
equivalent. 

602b. Selected Topics in Electricity and Atomic Structure (2). Study 
of electricity and the physics of the atom using knowledge of dynamics 
gained in Physics 602a, Part III of the PSSC physics course. Pre- 
requisites: Physics 602a or its equivalent. 

603. Selected Topics in Basic Physics (2). A study of fundamental con- 
cepts in physics and some of their relationships to other sciences which 
are essential to General Science. Thirty lecture and twelve laboratory 
hours. Pr. Consent of instructor and Dean of Graduate School. 

606. Selected Topics in Mechanics (2). A study of fundamental laws 
and principles of mechanics and their applications in allied scientific 
fields. Prerequisite: Physics 601a, b or Physics 602a, b or the equivalent 
with consent of instructor and Dean of the Graduate School. 

607. Selected Topics in Electricity and Magnetism (2). A study of 
fundamental laws and principles of electricity and magnetism and their 
applications in allied scientific fields. Prerequisite: Physics 601a, b or 
602a, b or the equivalent with consent of the instructor and Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

615. Fundamentals of Physics (3). A study of the fundamental laws 
and concepts of physics which are needed in the physical science pro- 
gram of the elementary school pupil. 

201 



PSYCHOLOGY 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Duffy, Ray, Smith (Head of the Department) ; 
Assistant Professors Aiken 1 , Dunham, Noblin; Instructor 
Kasaoka; Lecturer Friedman. 

Students planning to major in psychology are expected to take 
Psychology 211-212 as their introductory course. A student who takes 
Psychology 221 and then decides to major will be required to take 
Psychology 213-214 in her junior year. Among the advanced courses, 
Psychology 510, 515, 520 and 521 are required of all majors. Every 
major is strongly advised also to take Psychology 341, 343, 537 and 
545, as well as courses in mathematics and the natural sciences other 
than psychology. Finally, a student planning to go on to graduate work 
in psychology would be wise to select her undergraduate language from 
among French, German, and Russian. 

211-212. General Psychology (Experimental) (3:2:3)-(3:2:3). Presents 
basic principles and methods of psychology as experimental natural 
science. May not be taken for credit by students who have reecived 
credit for 221. May be substituted for 221 in any program. May be taken 
by freshmen with permission of head of department. Miss Duffy, Mr. 
Ray, Mr. Smith. 

213-214. General Psychology Laboratory (1:0:3)-(1:0:3). Permits as- 
signment of students to laboratory sections alone of 211-212, under 
special circumstances. May not be taken for credit by students who have 
received credit for 211-212. Miss Duffy, Mrs. Ray, Mr. Smith. 

221r. General Psychology (3:3). Point of view, problems, and methods 
of psychology; fundamental principles necessary for understanding be- 
havior. May not be taken for credit by students who have received 
credit for 211-212. Staff. 

222r. Educational Psychology (3:3). Psychological facts and principles 
of motivation, learning, individual differences, and other areas related 
to teaching. Pr. 211-212 or 221. 

224. Human Relations (3:3). Nature and dynamics of normal and ab- 
normal behavior in infancy, childhood, adolescence, maturity, and sen- 
escence; nature of interpersonal relations in large and small groups. 
Pr. 211-212 or 221. Mr. Friedman. 

326r. Psychology of Infancy and Childhood (3:3). Survey of develop- 
ment and behavior of children from infancy to adolescence. Aspects of 



'On leave, 1963-1964. 

202 



PSYCHOLOGY 

development (physical, intellectual, motor, personality, etc.) as well as 
age periods (prenatal, neo-natal, infancy, and childhood) considered. 
Observational studies of various age levels. Pr. 211-212 or 221. May not 
be taken for credit by a student who has obtained credit for Home 
Economics 302. Mrs. Dunham. 

333r. Special Problems in Psychology (1) to (3). Opportunity for stu- 
dents to work individually or in small groups on psychological problems 
of special interest. Work may represent either survey of given field or 
intensive investigation of particular problem. Student should consult 
instructor before registering for this course. Staff. 

334r. Special Problems in Psychology (1) to (3). Continuation of 333. 
Staff. 

341. Abnormal Psychology (3:3). Study of abnormal mental phenomena 
in relation to normal life, including such topics as sensation, perception, 
thought, sleep, dreams, hypnosis, dissociation, psychoneuroses, and per- 
sonality disorders. Pr. six hours in psychology, or consent of instructor. 
Mr. Noblin. 

342. Psychology of Adolescence and Adulthood (3:3). Individual and 
social development from early adolescence through later adolescence, 
adulthood, and old age. Interrelation of all aspects of development em- 
phasized. Characteristic adjustment problems in the various age periods 
will be considered together with methods of meeting these problems. Pr. 
211-212 or 221. Mrs. Dunham. 

343. Advanced Developmental Psychology (3:3). Survey at advanced 
level of extensive physical and psychological changes that occur through- 
out the course of life from conception through birth, childhood, adoles- 
cence, and maturity, to old age. Representative studies of behavior and 
development at various levels reviewed. Pr., six credits in psychology or 
equivalent courses, including 211-212 or 221. 

347. Dynamics of Social Behavior (3:3). A study of needs, wants, in- 
terests, and motives and their effect upon social behavior and values. 
Pr. 211-212 or 221. Mrs. Dunham. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). Staff. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

502. Psychology of the Exceptional Child (3:3). General survey of sig- 
nificant psychological problems characteristic of various classes of 
exceptional children. Especially designed to fit the needs of the teacher 
in special education. Pr. 211-212 or 221, and Ed. 540. 

203 



PSYCHOLOGY 

503. Mental Deficiency (3:3). Definitions, theories, classifications, etiol- 
ogy, diagnosis, and psychotherapy in the area of mental deficiency. Pr. 
211-212 or 221, and consent of the instructor. 

504. Behavior Disorders in Children (3:3). Clinical and experimental 
approaches to psychopathology of childhood. Etiology and modification 
of deviant behavior in various age groups through adolescence. Pr. 326 
or 342 or consent of instructor. Mr. Noblin. 

510. Statistics in Behavioral Science Research (3:3). Moment and 
product-moment statistics; linear and curvilinear prediction; description 
and inference; estimating parameters and testing significance; experi- 
mental and nonexperimental research designs. Mr. Ray. 

511. Experimental Design in the Behavioral Sciences (3:3). Definition 
of an experiment; validity and precision; completely randomized design; 
matched-group design; covariance design; factorial designs; functional 
analysis by means of individual comparisons. Pr. 510. Mr. Ray. 

515. History and Systems of Psychology (3:3). Discussion of pre- 
scientific thinking on psychological problems, origin of systems of 
psychology, and way in which these systems are reflected in contem- 
porary psychology. Required of psychology majors. Pr. 211-212 or 221. 
Miss Duffy. 

520. Physiological Psychology (3:2:3). Study of physiological bases of 
psychological processes, with special attention to structure and function 
of nervous system. Pr. 211-212 (preferred) or 221. Mr. Smith. 

521. Experimental Psychology (3:3). Methods, findings, and theories in 
experimental study of such basic psychological processes as sensation, 
perception, thought, motivation and reaction, emotion, and learning. 
Required for psychology majors. Pr. 510, 520. Mr. Smith. 

522. Activation and Behavior (3:3). Examination of the physiological 
and psychological causes of changes in the degree of activation or arousal 
and consideration of both established and hypothesized relationships to 
various aspects of behavior, among these, personality and abnormal 
behavior. Pr. senior or graduate standing as a psychology or biology 
major, or permission of instructor. Miss Duffy. 

535. Personnel Psychology (3:3). For students interested in doing per- 
sonnel work, with emphasis on organization, problems, and practices of 
personnel administration, and on vocational choice and employee selec- 
tion. Pr. 211-212 or 221 or consent of instructor. Mr. Aiken. 

537. Psychological Tests and Measurements (3:3). Study of theory and 
practice of psychological testing, with specific attention to instruments 
designed for use with exceptional children and in special education. 

204 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Experience in the administration and scoring of group tests. Oppor- 
tunities for observing administration of individual tests. Pr. 211-212, 
or 221 plus three additional hours in psychology. Mr. Aiken. 

540. Adolescent Development (2). Physical, mental, and emotional 
development of adolescents, including social adaptation and interests, 
attitudes, and ideals. Pr. 3 hours in psychology at undergraduate or 
graduate level. Mrs. Dunham. 

545. The Development of Personality (3:3). Study of individual differ- 
ences in behavior, and of biological and social factors which produce 
these differences. Pr. 211-212 or 221. Miss Duffy. 

601. Graduate Problems in Psychology (1) to (3). Opportunity for grad- 
uate students to work individually or in small groups on psychological 
problems of special interest. Work may represent either survey of given 
field or intensive investigation of particular problems. Students should 
consult instructor before registering in this course, which is intended 
strictly for students with a strong background in psychology and not 
as an introduction to psychology at the graduate level. Staff. 

602. Seminar in Systematic Issues (3:3). Contemporary state of knowl- 
edge with regard to the logic and language of psychology, activation in 
behavior, and theory of measurement. 

603. Seminar in Advanced General Psychology (3:3). Contemporary 
state of knowledge with regard to perception, motivation and emotion, 
and learning. 

604. Seminar in Individual and Group Behavior (3:3). Contemporary 
state of knowledge with regard to human development, personality, social 
psychology, and species differences. 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Professors Barineau, Blend (Head of the Department), 
Farinholt, Miller; Associate Professors Abbott, Felt, 
Funderburk 1 , Shaver ; Assistant Professors Atkinson, 
Couch; Instructors Cagigao, Charpenel, Fiore, Guiney, 
Lay, Lucas, Whitaker; Lecturer Masanes; Teaching Assist- 
ant Koenig. 

The department has established two sequences in French and 
Spanish in order to make the work of the students majoring in these 
subjects more definite and purposeful. These are (1) the literary 
sequence, and (2) the teaching sequence. The list of courses which 



'Part-time. 

205 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

compose these sequences and other information may be obtained at the 
office of the Department of Romance Languages. 

Since the courses numbered 207, 208, 209, 210, 211-212 are intro- 
ductory to some higher courses in both French and Spanish, students 
majoring in those languages will profit by completing four semesters of 
these in their sophomore years. 

Students who terminate their study of French or Spanish with a 200 
course are expected to take French, or Spanish, 207, 208. 

FRENCH 

101-102. Elementary Course (3:3)-(3:3). Introduction, with oral em- 
phasis, to elementary principles of the French language. Reading of some 
French literature. Supplementary recordings. Staff. 

103-104. Intermediate Course (3:3). -(3:3). Rapid review of main ele- 
ments of grammar. Emphasis on vocabulary building, pronunciation, 
composition and aural comprehension. Readings based on cultural ma- 
terial and significant literary works. Language laboratory sessions and 
audio-visual aids. Staff. 

113, 114. The Twentieth-Century Novel Before World War I (1:1), 
(1:1). A reading course elective for freshmen and sophomores. Staff. 

207, 208. Readings from Literature (3:3), (3:3). Reading in chrono- 
logical order of selections from French literature. Staff. 

209, 210. Intermediate Composition (3:3), (3:3). Emphasis on language. 
Intensive study of grammar, translation into French of English sen- 
tences and of connected discourse in English, dictation, and some con- 
versation. One modern French text read each semester outside of class. 
Mr. Atkinson. 

211-212. Intermediate Conversation (3:3)-(3:3). Review, through con- 
versation, composition, and dictation, of the conjugation of the French 
verb and of fundamental principles of modern French syntax. Intensive 
and methodical training in the acquisition of an active and idomatic 
French vocabulary. Pr. 207 208 or 209, 210. 

313. The Contemporary French Novel (3:3). A study of the significant 
works of French novelists, from World War I to the present, whose 
writings reflect new trends in the novel in France. Elective for students 
who have had French 207-208 or its equivalent. Mr. Blend. 

327r. Seventeenth-Century Literature (3:3). A study of certain plays 
of Corneille, Racine and Moliere and as much of the writers of great 
prose as possible. Mr. Felt. (Offered 1964-65.) 

206 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

330r. Eighteenth-Century Literature (3:3). A study of selected works of 
Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. If time permits, Prevost, 
Marivaux, Beaumarchais and Bernardin de St. Pierre. Mr. Felt. (Offered 
1964-65.) 

331. French Romanticism (3:3). A study of Romantic poetry, novels 
and dramas with emphasis on poetry. Miss Barineau. (Offered 1964-65.) 

333. The Nineteenth-Century French Novel (3:3). An intensive study 
of some of the most important French novels of the 19th century. The 
authors to be studied include Benjamin Constant, Stendhal, Balzac, 
Flaubert, the Goncourt, and Zola. Mr. Couch. (Offered in 1964-1965.) 
Prerequisites French 207, 208. 

340. Modern French Poetry (3:3). A brief study of Baudelaire, Lau- 
treamont, Rimbaud, and Mallarme followed by selected poems of Valery, 
Claudel, Apollinaire, Aragon, Eluard, Fargue, Supervielle, Reverdy. Mr. 
Guiney. (Offered 1964-65.) 

345. Old French Literature (3:3). Readings in French literature of the 
Middle Ages accompanied by a study of the development of the French 
language. Selections read in the vernacular and in modern translation. 
Elective for students who have had French 207-208 or its equivalent. 
Mr. Atkinson. 

353, 354. Advanced Composition (3:3), (3:3). Intensive study of modern 
French prose. Accurate translations into French of literary and collo- 
quial English. Miss Barineau. 

373. Sixteenth-Century Literature (3:3). A survey of sixteenth-century 
literature with a concentrated study of the works of Calvin, Marot, 
Rabelais and the poets of the Pleiade, with a special emphasis on the 
Essais of Montaigne. Mr. Couch. (Offered 1964-65.) 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). Staff. 

571, 572. French Civilization (3:3), (3:3). A general information course 
on French and the French people. Historical and geographical back- 
ground for intensive study of national traits, home life, institutions, and 
culture. Stress on present-day France. Pr. 6 hours of Grade II French 
or the equivalent. Staff. 



SPANISH 

101-102. Elementary Course (3:3) -(3:3). Thorough drill in pronunci- 
ation, vocabulary building, and important principles of grammar. Staff. 

103-104. Intermediate Course (3:3) -(3:3). Rapid review of main ele- 
ments of grammar. Emphasis on vocabulary building, pronunciation, 



207 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

composition and aural comprehension, Readings based on cultural ma- 
terial and significant literary works. Language laboratory sessions and 
audio-visual aids. Staff. 

113, 114. Readings in Modern Literature of the Spanish Speaking World 

(1:1), (1:1). An elective course for freshmen and sophomores. Staff. 

207, 208. Readings from Spanish Literature (3:3), (3:3). Readings in 
chronological order of selections from Spanish literature. Staff. 

209, 210. Intermediate Composition (3:3), (3:3). Emphasis on lan- 
guage. Intensive study of Spanish grammar, translation into Spanish 
of English sentences and of connected discourse in English, dictation, 
pronunciation, and some conversation. Miss Abbott. 

211-212. Intermediate Conversation (3:3)-(3:3). An introduction to the 
spoken approach to Spanish. Oral practice based on aural comprehen- 
sion, the reading of simple texts, and vocabulary studies, records and 
laboratory work. Mr. Charpenel. Pr. 207, 208 or 209, 210. 

313, 314. Readings in Modern Literature of the Spanish Speaking 
World (1:1), (1:1). A reading course, elective for students who have 
had Spanish 207, 208 or its equivalent. Staff. 

321. Modern Spanish Novel (3:3). Development of the novel from the 
nineteenth century to the present. Intensive study of novels by Galdos, 
Blasco Ibafiez, Martinez Sierra, Valle-Inclan, Ricardo Leon, Perez de 
Ayala and Unamuno. Mrs. Whitaker. 

324. Modern Spanish Drama (3:3). A history of the development of the 
drama in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with intensive study 
of representative plays. Miss Abbott. Offered in 1963-1964. 

326. Spanish American Literature from Modernism to the Present (3:3). 
Analysis of representative works from Modernism through the Contem- 
porary Period. Lectures on social, literary, and cultural backgrounds. 
(Offered 1964-65.) Miss Masanes. 

327, 328. Survey of Spanish Literature (3:3), (3:3). From the begin- 
ning to 1700; from 1700 to the present. Miss Farinholt. 

334. Drama of the Golden Age (3:3). A review of the evolution of 
Spanish drama, with detailed study of plays by Lope de Vega, Ruiz de 
Alarcon, Tirso de Molina, and Calderon. Miss Farinholt. (Offered 
1964-65.) 

351, 352. Advanced Conversation. For students who have already at- 
tained some proficiency in oral Spanish. This course, conducted wholly 
in Spanish and with emphasis placed on free conversation, is designed 

208 



SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 

to bring the student to express herself fluently on subjects likely to be 
discussed in ordinary conversation. Futher study of pronunciation and 
intonation. Oral discussions and reports. 

353, 354. Advanced Composition (3:3) -(3:3). A comprehensive review 
of grammar. Composition based on model texts. Free composition. (Rec- 
ommended for prospective teachers.) Miss Abbott. (Offered 1964-65.) 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3)-(3:3). Staff. 

571. Spanish Civilization (3:3). The development of Spanish culture. 
Pr. 6 hours of Grade II Spanish or the equivalent. 

572. Spanish American Civilization (3:3). The development of Spanish 
American culture. Pr. 6 hours of Grade II Spanish or the equivalent. 
Miss Farinholt. 

ITALIAN 

201-202. Beginning Course (3:3) -(3:3). Introduction to elementary 
Italian. Some reading and conversation. Students may elect the course 
after fulfilling the freshman and sophomore language requirements. 
Miss Miller. (Offered 1964-65.) 

303-304. Intermediate Course. This is a continuation of Italian 201-202. 
After a further grounding of the principles of grammar, the student 
will read Dante's Inferno and selections from Petrarch, Boccaccio, and 
other authors. Miss Miller. (Offered 1963-1964.) 

The following courses will be offered when there is sufficient reg- 
istration. 

Fr. 335, 336. French Literature since 1850 

Sp. 333. The Renaissance and the Golden Age 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

Professors Mossman, Shivers (Head of the Department) ; 
Assistant Professors Burgess, Allen, Kupferer, Rubel; In- 
structors Knox, Stephens ; Lecturer Miguens. 

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology provides the student 
with an analytic and systematic approach to human socio-cultural be- 
havior as part of liberal education. Further, it provides a foundation 
for advanced study or for a variety of occupations. 



209 



SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY* 

lllr. Southern Regions (3:3). A study of society in the Southeastern 
states in the light of traditional and changing culture patterns of the 
area. Miss Shivers, Mr. Allen. 

135r. Marriage (2:2). A functional study of courtship and marriage. 
Elective for one-year Commercial students. Miss Shivers. 

211r. Introduction to Sociology (3:3). The scientific study of social 
behavior including such factors involved in the functioning and de- 
velopment of human society as culture, personality, social organization, 
institutions, stratification, process, and social change. Staff. 

322. Sociology of Deviant Behavior (3:3). Sociological contributions to 
analysis and treatment of contemporary types of deviant behavior. 
Relationship of deviant behavior to social change. Prerequisite: 211. 
Mr. Allen. 

325. The Small Group (2:2). An approach to the processes of social 
relations in various types of the small group. Reviews major field and 
laboratory studies and emphasizes the connection between small groups 
and the larger society. Mr. Knox. 

326. The Community (3:3). Development and theory of modern com- 
munity life with special reference to processes of community relations, 
complexities of community structure, and patterns of change. Miss 
Burgess. 

2 327. Race and Culture Contact (3:3). Patterns of interaction between 
peoples differing in race and culture. Miss Burgess. 

330. Sociology of Religion (3:3). An introduction to sociological study 
in the field of religion with emphasis on modern society and the relation 
of religion to other institutions and the functions of religious roles. 
Mr. Allen. 

333. The Family (3:3). A study of the American family as a unity of 
interacting persons (1) that shapes the personality development of its 
members and (2) that is adaptive to social change. Mr. Knox. 

3 335r. Marriage (3:3). A study of the practical problems of courtship 
and marriage, with emphasis on personal relationships. Miss Shivers. 

336. Criminology (3:3). A survey of the nature and evolution of crime, 
causes, examination of criminal procedure, and historical development 
of the methods of punishment. Analysis of case studies of delinquents; 
treatment of the criminal. Miss Shivers. 

1 Majors may take a maximum of 42 semester hours in sociology and anthropology 
combined in courses above Grade I. 
2 Same as Anthropology 327. 
3 This course cannot be used to fulfill the social science requirement for graduation. 

210 



SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 

344. Introduction to Sociological Research (3:3). Functions of theory 
and methodology in the design and execution of research. Analysis and 
interpretation of selected research projects in sociology and social 
psychology. Miss Burgess. 

411. Population Problems and Human Ecology (3:3). Population com- 
position, population growth; the distribution of human beings in space 
and its effect on their social life. Mr. Allen. 

439, 440. Introduction to the Field of Social Work (3:3), (3:3). A 
general view of the entire field of public welfare and the voluntary 
social services including historical background and the principles and 
methods underlying practice. In the first semester field trips are taken 
to agencies in the local community and state. In the second semester 
each student is placed in a community agency for experience three hours 
per week. Miss Mossman. 

449. Sociological Theory (3:3). Emergence of sociological theory from 
social philosophy and the role of sociological theory in the development 
of social science. Required for majors. Mr. Allen. 

1 450. Sociological Statistics (3:3). An introduction to statistical methods 
and their application in economics, sociology, business administration, 
governmental affairs, and in other social sciences. Topics covered will 
include: measures of central tendency, dispersion, and relationship; 
trends; index numbers; time series analysis. Emphasis will be placed 
on problem solving and laboratory. A student taking this course may not 
receive credit for Mathematics 341 or Psychology 510. Credit may be 
received as either sociology or economics, but not both. Davies/Staff. 

469. Special Problems in Sociology (3:3). An opportunity for the stu- 
dent to work individually on problems of special interest to her. 

493-494. Honors Work (3:3), (3:3). Staff. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

523. Social Psychology (3:3). A study of individual and collective be- 
havior in relation to various social and cultural influences. Emphasis on 
the social and cultural aspects of group life. Prerequisite: Introductory 
Sociology or General Psychology or permission of the instructor. Mr. 
Knox. 

531. Social Structure and Stratification (3:3). A systematic analysis of 
class and caste systems, power relationships, status groupings, in- 
stitutional and mobility patterns within the structure of society. Em- 
phasis will be placed on theory and research in the field as it relates 



iSame as Economics 450. 

211 



SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 

to differential social behavior. Prerequisites: Junior-Senior standing; 
Sociology 211 or Anthropology 212; or by consent of instructor. Miss 
Burgess. 

542. Community Services for Children (2:2). A study of the normal 
process of socialization will serve as background for a discussion of 
special services for children in the community and the basic principles 
in child care upon which agency services are established. Miss Mossman. 

Courses for Graduates 

630b. Urban Sociology (2:2). An analysis of the socio-psychological 
aspects of urbanization and urban disorganization. 

640. Community Organization (2:2). A study of the changing role of 
the local community: social class differentials, basic institutions and 
associations in community organization, leadership roles and influence 
patterns. 

641. Community Services for Children (2:2). Provisions for the special 
care of children with a focus on the changing conceptions of juvenile 
delinquency. 

685. Sociology of Education (2:2). The school system is analyzed with 
the focus on human relationships. School-community relations are studied 
with special reference to the social structure of the community and its 
effect on the functioning of the school. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

The program in anthropology is designed to provide students with an 
understanding of man and his various ways from the earliest times until 
the present. Special emphasis is placed upon the cultures of the 
Americas and peoples of Asia. 

212r. Introduction to Anthropology (3:3). A survey of general anthro- 
pology. It includes: an inquiry into the origins of man; prehistory; and 
a comparative study of cultures. Staff. 

1 327. Race and Culture Contact (3:3). Patterns of interaction between 
peoples differing in race and culture. Miss Burgess. 

328. Cultural Anthropology (3:3). Comparative study of culture and its 
influence on human behavior. Theoretical and applied aspects of cultural 
anthropology are considered. Miss Kupferer. 

329. Comparative Social Organization (3:3). A comparative study of 
the organization of social life in primitive and peasant groups. Mr. 
Rubel. 



1 Same as Sociology 327. 

212 



SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 

331. Native Peoples of North America (3:3). A study of the ways of 
life both aboriginal and contemporary of the indigenous people of North 
America. Miss Kupferer. 

332. Peoples of Asia (3:3). A study of ways of life in selected areas of 
Asia, with stress on China, Japan and India. Mr. Rubel. 

352. The Peoples of Latin America (3:3). An introduction to the peoples 
of Latin America with special reference to contemporary tribal and 
peasant groups. Mr. Rubel. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

551. Dynamics of Culture Growth and Change (3:3). An examination of 
the development of culture and the analysis of acculturation stemming 
from contacts of peoples of different cultural heritages. Miss Kupferer. 

Courses for Graduates 

683ab. Culture and Society (2:2), (2:2). a. Analysis of the concept of 
culture. Relation of culture to society and the individual, b. Comparative 
study of primitive cultures, directed toward broader comprehension of 
human society. 



213 



PART VIII. 



The Graduate School 



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VIII. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
AT GREENSBORO 

William Clyde Friday, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., President 

Donald Benton Anderson, B.A., B.Sc.Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President 

Otis A. Singletary, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chancellor 

James S. Ferguson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean 

THE ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD2 

Richard Bardolph, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of History 

iJosEPH A. Bryant, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of English 

Elizabeth Duffy, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

Bruce M. Eberhart, B.A., Ph.D., Professor of Biology 

Vance T. Littlejohn, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., Professor of Business 
Education 

Ethel L. Martus, B.A., M.S., Professor of Physical Education 

iLEE Rigsby, B.M., M.M., Ph.D., Professor of Music 

Donald W. Russell, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., Professor of Education 

1 Irwin V. Sperry, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., Professor of Home Economics 

ORGANIZATION 

Under a principle of the Consolidated University of North Carolina 
known as "allocation of function," the Graduate School of the University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro is authorized to conduct graduate study 
leading to the Master of Arts degree in Education, English, and History; 
the Master of Education degree in Business Education, Education, 
English, Home Economics, Music Education, Physical Education, and 
Special Education; the Master of Fine Arts degree in Painting and 
Graphic Arts, Music Composition, Writing, and Dance; the Master of 
Music in applied fields; the Master of Science degree in Business Edu- 
cation and Home Economics; the degrees of Master of Science in 
Business Education, Master of Science in Home Economics, and Master 
of Science in Physical Education; and the Doctor of Philosophy degree 
in Home Economics. These areas and the Division as a whole are 
represented in and subject to the Graduate Executive Council of the 
Consolidated University. Fundamental policy and basic regulations are 
formulated by this Council and are reflected in regulations given herein. 

a Members of the Graduate Executive Council of the University of N. C 
^The Dean of the Graduate School and the Dean of the College are ex-officio members 
of the Graduate Administrative Board. 

217 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

(In April, 1962, the Graduate Executive Council expanded the area of 
study at the Greensboro campus of the University to include master's 
degree programs in the liberal arts. The Council is currently considering 
specific proposals for Master of Arts degrees in Biology and Psychology. 
If approved, these programs would be available in 1964-65.) 

Other areas of graduate study are offered at the University of 
North Carolina and North Carolina State divisions of the University 
at Chapel Hill and Raleigh, respectively. 

The administration of the Graduate School of the University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro is vested in an Administrative Board 
and Dean of the Graduate School. The Board, headed by the Dean, 
transacts local graduate business within the framework of regulations 
established by the Graduate Executive Council of the Consolidated Uni- 
versity. The Dean serves as entrance examiner and performs through 
his office the customary duties. 

Additional rules, regulations, and standards peculiar to each of the 
areas of graduate study are established and administered by the de- 
partment or school concerned. These added standards will appear in the 
appropriate sections of the catalogue of the Graduate School of the 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro. The prospective student 
should read such sections with care. 

Inquiries concerning curricula, specific courses, scholarships, fellow- 
ships, and information peculiar to a field of study should be sent 
directly to the department or school concerned. General information 
may be obtained from the office of the Dean of the Graduate School. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Admission to Graduate Study: 1 For unconditional admission to 
graduate study as a candidate for a degree, the applicant must hold a 
bachelor's degree from a recognized institution. The transcript must 
show an appropriate undergraduate major and satisfactory academic 
standing. 

The average in the major or basic courses prerequisite to the area of 
proposed graduate study should be B or better. In cases of insufficient 
preparation or of other inadequacy of undergraduate work, prerequisite 
courses which do not carry graduate credit will be prescribed and must 
be satisfactorily completed before unconditional admission to a graduate 
degree program will be granted. 



lUnder a ruling of the Board of Trustees, April, 1962, male students were declared 
eligible for admission to the Graduate School, beginning September 1, 1962. 



218 



The Graduate School 

All candidates for admission must take the Aptitude Section of the 
Graduate Record Examination, 1 or under certain circumstances and 
with the consent of the Graduate Dean, the National Teacher Examina- 
tions or the Miller Analogies Test, before admission. 

Provisional admission may be granted to applicants who do not meet 
all the formal requirements, or to applicants from nonaccredited insti- 
tutions. For teachers in service or other students taking less than a full 
course load, credit to be applied toward a graduate degree will be 
limited to 10 semester hours earned while a student is in provisional 
admission status. Students in residence must remove all conditions 
before the beginning of the final semester in residence. 

Applications for admission to the Graduate School, accompanied by- 
full credentials in the form of transcripts of academic records, should 
be filed in the office of the Dean at least thirty days in advance of the 
term in which admission is sought. 

Applicants for graduate study who have not expressed the intention 
to pursue a degree program may be admitted as unclassified graduate 
students. The regulations and standards for admission applicable to 
degree candidates apply to unclassified graduate students. 

Certain applicants who do not meet all requirements for admission 
to graduate study but who hold all necessary prerequisites for specific 
courses may be admitted as special graduate students. Credits earned 
while in this status may not be applied toward a graduate degree. 

Undergraduate students in this institution who plan to undertake 
graduate study, and who in the last semester of residence are required 
to take less than twelve semester hours of work to fulfill all require- 
ments for the bachelor's degree, may be allowed to enroll in certain 
courses for the purpose of obtaining graduate credit, provided approval 
is granted by the Dean of the Graduate School, the student's major 
adviser, and the Senior Academic Class Adviser. The total credit to be 
obtained in this way shall not exceed twelve hours including under- 
graduate credit. 

The regulations concerning admission to graduate study are appli- 
cable to students seeking graduate credit through extension courses. 

Graduate students in good standing at other units of the Consolidated 
University of North Carolina are eligible to take courses at the Greens- 
boro Division of the Graduate School, upon recommendation of the 
Dean of the Graduate School at the unit at which they are regularly 
enrolled. 



ilnformation on this test, including application blank, may be obtained from the 
Dean of the Graduate School or by writing Educational Testing Service, Princeton, 
New Jersey. 



219 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Health: Each new student who plans to reside on campus, is re- 
quired to send to the College Health Officer a medical history form 
available from the Graduate School Office, properly completed by her 
physician. A former student who has been approved for readmission and 
who has been away from the campus for a year or more is required 
to resubmit the medical form. Nonresident students enrolled for more 
than six hours may avail themselves of this service. 

Extension Credit Defined: All off -campus and TV courses are 
classified as "Extension"; all courses offered on campus are classified as 
"Residence." Such courses offered by other units of the Consolidated 
University or other graduate institutions are similarly defined. Credits 
gained in correspondence courses at any institution are not accepted. 

Unit of Academic Credit: The unit of work is the semester hour, 
by which is meant one 50-minute lecture period or at least two such 
periods of laboratory or field work each week for a semester. 

Student Loads: The minimum load for a full-time student is nine 
semester hours; normal full-time load is 12 semester hours. Students 
will not be permitted to register for more than 15 semester hours per 
semester in the regular sessions, nor exceed one semester hour per week 
in the summer session. 

Full-time teachers in service may not register for more than four 
semester hours of graduate work in any regular term. Full-time gradu- 
ate assistants are restricted to a maximum of 11 semester hours of 
course work per term. 

Grading Symbols for Graduate Courses: Graduate grades are re- 
ported as follows: A, superior; B, good; C, weak but acceptable for 
graduate credit; and F, failure. For the completion of a graduate degree 
program, an overall average of B or better is required in both the 
major and minor fields; no more than six semester hours of credit 
evaluated as C may be applied toward the master's degree. 

For students withdrawing from courses after the last date for with- 
drawal without penalty, the following symbols are used; W, orderly 
withdrawal with permission of graduate dean, and satisfactory status 
in course at time of withdrawal; WF, orderly withdrawal but in failing 
status at time of withdrawal. Students abandoning courses without 
establishing sufficient reason for withdrawal will be assigned grades 
of F. 

The symbol I indicates failure to complete course requirements by 
the end of the term in which the course was offered. The I may be 
removed by completion of the deferred requirements within one calendar 
year from the last day of the term in which the course was offered. An 
I not so removed within the time limit automatically becomes an F. 

220 



The Graduate School 

Commencement: Degrees are awarded only on the date of com- 
mencement exercises following the completion of all requirements for 
the degree. Attendance at commencement is required of all graduating 
students unless individually excused by the Graduate Dean. 

Additional Regulations: Additional rules, regulations, and stand- 
ards peculiar to each of the areas of graduate study are established and 
administered by the department or school concerned. These added stand- 
ards appear in the appropriate sections of the catalogue. The prospective 
student should read such sections with care. 

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

Residence and Time Limits: The master's curriculum, including the 
thesis, must be completed within six calendar years. 

Credit for graduate work to be applied in satisfaction of require- 
ments for the master's degree, not to exceed six semester hours, may be 
transferred from regionally accredited institutions. Such transfer must 
be recommended by the chairman of the department in which the student 
does his major work and is subject to the approval of the Graduate 
Dean. In some of the curricula, the student is encouraged to do a por- 
tion of his work at North Carolina State in Raleigh or at the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The student should secure approval 
from his major adviser and the Graduate Dean in advance of registration 
at other units. No more than six semester hours of credit toward a 
graduate degree may be gained through extension courses, 1 and credit 
is given only on extension work taken in the Consolidated University. 
In general, however, not less than two-thirds of the total program for 
the master's degree must be completed in residence courses at the 
Woman's College. 

Hours Required for the Master's Degree: The course hour re- 
quirements vary with the graduate degree sought, viz., Master of Fine 
Arts and the Master of Arts in Education, thirty-six semester hours 
of which twenty-four must be in a major field and twelve in a related 
minor; Master of Education, thirty-two semester hours of which twenty 
must be in a major field, six in a minor, and six in a variable which 
may fall within the major or minor fields or in a related department; 
Master of Science, thirty semester hours of which twenty must be in 
the major field and ten in the minor. The Master of Arts degree pro- 
grams in English and history have thirty semester hour requirements, 
eighteen to twenty-one being in the major and the remainder in a related 
minor. Each of the degree proposals under consideration by the Graduate 
Executive Council (Master of Arts in Biology, Master of Arts in 
Psychology) calls for a thirty semester hour requirement. 



! No credit gained in extension courses is creditable toward the degree for students 
with major in the Department of Physical Education. 

221 



University op North Carolina at Greensboro 

Responsibility for Planning Programs: The program of each 
student shall be planned with the assistance of an adviser appointed 
by the Department Chairman with the approval of the Graduate Dean. 
The adviser is charged with the responsibility of interpreting depart- 
mental requirements for the student in the light of particular needs 
of the student and arranging an orderly sequence of activities in 
progress toward the anticipated degree. 

Required Skills: For all master's degrees except the Master of 
Education, the student must acquire an appropriate skill prior to making 
application for admission to candidacy. This may be either aesthetics 
(Creative Arts Program), a reading knowledge of a modern foreign 
language, or, under certain circumstances, the fundamentals of statistics. 

When the required skill is a foreign language, this knowledge will be 
tested by a special examination given by the University language de- 
partment concerned. This requirement may be met by submitting a 
satisfactory score on one of the Foreign Language Tests for Graduate 
Students administered by Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New 
Jersey. Foreign students whose native language is not English, who 
are seeking a Master's degree in which a reading knowledge of a modern 
foreign language is required, may not offer their native language in 
satisfaction of this requirement. They may offer a reading knowledge 
of any other modern foreign language, including English. 

When the required skill is statistics, this knowledge will be tested 
by special examination given by the Department of Mathematics of the 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Admission to Candidacy: Admission to the Graduate School is not 
tantamount to admission to candidacy for a graduate degree. The pur- 
pose of the requirement of admission to candidacy is to permit the 
department concerned and the Graduate Administrative Board to attest 
the student's eligibility to continue with work toward a degree, after 
course experience with that student. 

Formal application for admission to candidacy must be submitted to 
the Graduate Administrative Board on forms which are supplied by 
the Graduate School Office. This application may not be filed earlier than 
the first week of the second semester of residence, or, in the case of 
students taking less than full load, before ten hours of course work 
has been completed, at least six hours in the major department. This 
application must be submitted at least three months before the degree 
is to be conferred, or, in the case of students taking less than full load, 
no later than upon the completion of 16 hours of credit toward the 
degree. Admission is conditional upon: (a) the removal of all entrance 
conditions, (b) competence in the use of the appropriate skill, (c) 
quality of the graduate work already completed, and (d) satisfaction 
of special requirements of the department concerned. 

222 



The Graduate School 

Written Examination on the Major Field: The written examin- 
ation on the field of the major is set by the department concerned and 
may be scheduled at any convenient time after two-thirds of the course 
work has been completed. Admission to candidacy must be granted to 
the student prior to the written examination. 

Oral Examination: The oral examination is conducted by a special 
committee appointed by the Graduate Dean, including the thesis adviser 
as chairman, at least two other representatives of the major and minor 
subjects, and one member of the graduate faculty other than a member 
of the departments in which the major and minor subjects are offered. 
Although the examination may cover the entire graduate program of 
the student, the primary objective is to provide opportunity for the 
defense of the thesis. No oral examination is required of candidates 
for the Master of Education degree, except in Physical Education and 
Music Education. 

Thesis: A thesis plan endorsed by the chairman of the student's 
thesis committee must be filed in the Graduate School Office at least one 
semester prior to the time the degree is expected to be awarded. The 
thesis must conform to rules established by the Graduate Administrative 
Board in the University "Guide to Thesis Writing". Copies of the manual 
may be obtained from the Graduate School Office. Four copies of the 
thesis together with five copies of the abstract of the thesis must be 
filed in the Graduate School Office at least two weeks prior to the date 
the degree is expected. An abstract must accompany the thesis. No 
thesis is required of candidates for the Master of Education degree, 
except in the Music Education major, or Physical Education major. 

In the Creative Arts Program the thesis shall consist of a creative 
work on the professional level and of technical merit, and must be 
accompanied by a scholarly paper which gives the background of 
sources, historical influences, technical processes or compositional prob- 
lems essential to its interpretation. 

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE DEGREE OF 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

General: The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is conferred only upon 
those who have completed, with high distinction, a period of extended 
study and original investigation in a single field of learning, which 
results in a comprehensive knowledge of the area and of the research 
and scholarly tools for the development of new knowledge, and an 
ability to translate these tools and scholarly attainments into an orderly 
life-time attack on the significant areas for study within this field. This 
degree is not granted, therefore, upon the completion of any given 
amount of course work, but upon the demonstration by the candidate 

223 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

of competency in the chosen area, and by capability to accomplish an 
original research which may employ accepted techniques and mature 
theoretical formulations. 

Admission: The requirements for admission to a doctoral program 
are the same as those stated for admission to the Master of Arts or 
Master of Science degrees. 

Residence: A minimum of six full semesters of work beyond the 
Bachelor's degree is required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. In 
some instances and with the approval of the advisory committee and 
the Graduate Administrative Board, work done in other institutions 
outside the Consolidated University may be counted toward the degree, 
particularly work culminating in a master's degree from a regionally 
accredited institution and representing an appropriate area of study. 
Under no circumstances will the degree be awarded until the student 
has been in full residence at the Graduate School of the University of 
North Carolina at least two consecutive semesters. Unless specifically 
recommended by the department and approved in advance of such study 
by the Graduate Administrative Board, this minimum residence must 
be served at the Greensboro division of the Graduate School. 

Course of Study: At the time of admission the student should, 
with the advice of the chairman of the department, elect a major field. 
During the first semester in residence an advisory committee of three 
to five members will be appointed by the Graduate Dean, after consulta- 
tion with the department head, to prepare with the student a plan of 
graduate work. Copies of the program thus outlined must be filed in the 
student's permanent folder in the Graduate School Office, in the depart- 
ment files, with the chairman and each member of the advisory com- 
mittee, and with the student. Any subsequent changes in the subject 
of the thesis or in the plan of graduate work must be reported to the 
Graduate School Office for approval. 

The courses selected must represent an orderly and systematic study 
of a well-defined field and related areas, and are subject to the approval 
of the Graduate Dean and the Graduate Administrative Board. There 
shall be a major area which shall generally involve a minimum of sixty 
semester hours of core or area courses, and one or two minor areas 
consisting of at least twenty semester hours, and falling within an 
allied department or in the major department. The minor area must 
be one specifically approved for the selected major by the Graduate 
Administrative Board. 

The student's advisory committee will be drawn from the perma- 
nent graduate faculty of the Consolidated University, and must include 
at least one member from the major department, one from the minor 
area or areas, and one from a field related to the student's major 

224 



The Graduate School 

interest but from another division of the Graduate School. Other mem- 
bers may be drawn from any of the above categories, or from the 
graduate faculty at large. 

Languages: A reading knowledge of two modern foreign languages 
pertinent and relevant to the student's major area of study is required 
for the Ph.D. degree. These languages are recommended by the De- 
partment Head and approved by the Graduate Administrative Board. 
Proficiency in languages is determined by the appropriate language de- 
partment on the basis of a written examination embracing scientific 
literature in the major area. Satisfactory performance on Foreign 
Language Tests for Graduate Students administered by Educational 
Testing Service may be submitted in satisfaction of this requirement. 
The language requirements must be passed prior to the preliminary 
examinations and prior to admission to candidacy. 

Students whose native tongue is some language other than English 
may use English as one of the languages required for the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree. When English is submitted in partial fulfillment of 
the language requirements, the native language may not be used to 
satisfy the language requirements. Examinations in English will be 
given by the English Department of the University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro, and a statement certifying the candidate's proficiency in 
English must be filed in the Graduate School Office before the preliminary 
examinations may be taken. 

Preliminary Examinations: Not earlier than the second semester 
of the second year of resident graduate study and not later than the 
end of the third week of the academic year in which the degree is 
expected, each doctoral student is required to pass general comprehensive 
examinations (known as the qualifying or preliminary examinations). 
The examinations are given by an examining committee or graduate 
faculty members appointed by the Graduate Dean after consultation 
with the head of the department in which the student's major work 
has been taken. The examining committee usually consists of the stu- 
dent's advisory committee and a representative of the Graduate School, 
but may include other members of the graduate faculty. The oral part 
of these examinations is open to all members of the graduate faculty 
who may care to attend, and will be duly announced to the graduate 
faculty. 

Authorization for the qualifying examination is requested of the 
Graduate School by the chairman of the student's advisory committee 
when the major part of the student's program of course work has been 
completed and when, in the judgment of the committee, the student is 
prepared to devote the greater part of his time to the prosecution of 
his research study. He must also have filed a dissertation plan accept- 

225 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

able to his committee. Members of the examining committee will be 
notified of their appointment by the Graduate Office. The examination 
must be requested at least two weeks before the date of administration 
of his examination. 

The examination consists of two parts: (1) written examinations 
prepared by the Chairman with the assistance of the examining com- 
mittee and (2) an oral examination held before the entire examining 
committee. Upon receiving authorization for holding the qualifying 
examination, the chairman of the examining committee will give each 
member of the examining committee an opportunity to submit questions. 
The questions together with the student's answers will be returned to 
at least three members of the committee for evaluation. The questions 
may cover any phase of the course work taken by the student during 
the period of his graduate study or any subject logically related and 
basic to an understanding of the subject matter of the major and minor 
areas of study. They should be designed to measure the student's mastery 
of these subject matter fields and the adequacy of his preparation for 
scholarly investigation. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the written examinations the student 
must pass an oral examination before the entire examining committee. 
This examination usually follows the written examination within a 
month. The members of the examining committee will be notified by 
the Graduate School of the time and place arranged for the oral 
examination. The oral examination is designed to test the student's 
ability to relate factual knowledge to general principles. In the oral 
examination the student is expected to use his knowledge with accuracy 
and promptness and to demonstrate his ability to think beyond the facts 
learned in formal course work. 

When the examining committee consists of three members, a unani- 
mous vote of approval is required for passing the preliminary examin- 
ation. Approval may be conditioned, however, upon the completion of 
additional work in some particular field as may be required by the 
committee. In case a single dissenting vote is cast in a three-member 
committee, the course of action to be taken will become a matter for 
decision by the Administrative Board. 

Admission to Candidacy: A student is admitted to candidacy by 
action of the Graduate Administrative Board upon the approval of his 
dissertation plan by the Graduate Board, upon the completion of lan- 
guage requirements, and upon successful completion of both the written 
and oral parts of the preliminary examination. 

The Dissertation: The dissertation is the product of a thorough 
investigation of a basic and significant problem or question within the 
major area of study. An appropriate plan of attack and procedures 

226 



The Graduate School 

must be developed and executed by the student under the general 
guidance of the chairman of the advisory committee. The dissertation 
requirement is designed to teach and test the capacities of originality 
and generalization in the candidate. It should foster and attest to the 
emergence of the love of learning in the candidate, ability in scientific 
inquiry, an understanding and mastery of the techniques of scholarship, 
and the art of exposition within the field of specialization. 

The dissertation must be presented, in four typewritten copies, at 
least four weeks before the time at which the candidate expects his 
degree and at least one week prior to the final oral examination. It 
must comply with the rules for theses prescribed by the Graduate 
Administrative Board. Five copies of abstract of between 500 and 700 
words must also be supplied. The advisory committee, with such other 
professors as may be appointed by the Dean, shall examine the disserta- 
tion, and no dissertation shall be accepted unless it secures the unani- 
mous vote of his committee. Publication of the dissertation by means 
of microfilming is required by the Graduate School. The expense of 
microfilming is generally borne by the candidate. 

The final examination shall consist of an oral examination in defense 
of the methods used and the conclusions reached in the dissertation. 
This examination may include topics in the candidate's area of speciali- 
zation but beyond the scope of the dissertation. Approval of the thesis 
and the candidate's performance on the final oral examination must be 
attested by the signatures of the appointed examining committee on a 
form provided by the Graduate School. The thesis with the adviser's 
signature as evidence of final approval must be filed in the Graduate 
School Office at least one week prior to the award of the degree. 

Time Limits: The student must complete all requirements for the 
doctorate within five calendar years from the date of admission to can- 
didacy for that degree, and within ten years from the date of admission 
to the graduate program. 

EXPENSES 

The College reserves the right to make changes in charges for 
tuition and fees without advance notice. 

1. Tuition and Fees — Regular Graduate Students 

Regular graduate students are defined as those for whom study is 
the primary activity. In recognition of the fact that research, writing, 
and performance of assigned duties under assistantships often dictate 
the need for a reduced schedule of formal instruction by regular grad- 
uate students, provision is made whereby those scheduling less than 

227 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

10 credit hours are permitted to pay tuition and academic fees at 
proportionately less than the maximum rates. The rates per semester 
are as follows : 



Fees 


(All Students) 


Tuition 


Total 




Aca- 


Activi- 




Out-of- 




Out-of- 


Cr. Hrs. 


demic 


ties 


In-State 


State 


In-State 


State 


7 


$28.00 


$15.00 


$63.00 


$224.00 


$106.00 


$267.00 


8 


32.00 


15.00 


72.00 


256.00 


119.00 


303.00 


9 


36.00 


15.00 


81.00 


288.00 


132.00 


339.00 


Over 9 


40.50 


15.00 


87.50 


300.00 


143.00 


355.50 



2. Tuition and Fees — Incidental Graduate Students 

Incidental graduate students are defined as those for whom study 
represents an activity secondary to a full-time occupation, who do not 
reside on campus, and who take no more than two courses nor six credit 
hours of academic work during a semester. Such students pay tuition 
at the rate of $9 per credit hour of instruction ($32 for out-of-state 
students), plus an academic fee of $5 per semester regardless of the 
number of hours scheduled. Incidental students are exempt from the 
activities fee. The rates per semester are as follows : 



Fees (All Students) 



Tuition 



Total 









Out-of- 




Out-of- 


Cr. Hrs. 


Academic 


In-State 


State 


In-State 


State 


1 


$5.00 


$ 9.00 


$ 32.00 


$14.00 


$ 37.00 


2 


5.00 


18.00 


64.00 


23.00 


69.00 


3 


5.00 


27.00 


96.00 


32.00 


101.00 


4 


5.00 


36.00 


128.00 


41.00 


133.00 


5 


5.00 


45.00 


160.00 


50.00 


165.00 


6 


5.00 


54.00 


192.00 


59.00 


197.00 



3. Residence on Campus 

The cost of room, board, laundry and medical services of students 
living on campus is $280 per semester. 

4. Entertainment Series Subscription (Optional) 

A fee of $4.75 per semester entitles either regular or incidental 
students to admission to events in the lecture-entertainment series. 

5. Diploma Fee 

A diploma fee of $10 is payable at the beginning of the last term 
of residence for a graduate degree. 



228 



The Graduate School 

6. General Information 

Policies governing such matters as residence status for tuition 
payment, special fees for applied music, etc., are included in the 
EXPENSES section of the undergraduate catalogue; and when ap- 
plicable to graduate students are hereby incorporated into this section 
by reference. 

GRADUATE CURRICULA 

Inasmuch as the Graduate School of the University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro was formerly a part of the Woman's College, histori- 
cally its program has emphasized curricula of particular interest to 
women. As of September 1, 1962, however, men were admitted to the 
Graduate School and virtually all curricula were opened to them. Some 
graduate programs are offered primarily for full-time resident students, 
while others, generally those of interest to teachers in service, are 
offered in evening or Saturday classes and in the Summer Session. 
Minors and supporting courses are scheduled in a variety of areas both 
at Greensboro and at the other two divisions of the Consolidated Uni- 
versity at Chapel Hill and Raleigh. 

THE CREATIVE ARTS PROGRAM 

The program is designed to meet the need for work of graduate 
grade with a clear emphasis upon composition in the fields of painting 
and the graphic arts, music 1 , writing, and the dance. This program is 
offered only during the regular terms and within the regular weekly 
college schedule. Completion of the degree program will presuppose the 
attainment of a professional level of competence in composition in the 
art form in which the student elects to major. 

The program consists of work in one of the four major subjects and 
in a related minor culminating in the degree, Master of Fine Arts. 
Available at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro are an 
interdepartmental minor in the creative arts and minors in art history, 
painting and the graphic arts, literature, writing, music literature and 
history, and the dance. Related minors are also available at the Uni- 
versity in Chapel Hill and at North Carolina State in Raleigh. 

The establishment of this graduate program at Greensboro reflects 
the conviction that distinctive advantages for the pursuit of graduate 
work in the creative arts are present here. The University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro has a residential liberal arts college which for 
a number of years has given emphasis to work in the several arts and 
which possesses unusual facilities for the support of graduate study. 
The opportunity is present for individualized instruction from the strong 
staff of resident artist-teachers. 

229 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

The program should be of value to those who wish to teach in 
secondary schools and colleges as well as to those preparing for pro- 
fessional careers in one of the arts. Adequate supporting courses in the 
literature of each of the arts are offered together with courses which 
meet the state requirements for graduate certification. 

For admission to a major in painting, the student should have 54 
semester hours or the equivalent in undergraduate credits in art with a 
distribution of courses showing 15 semester hours in art history, 6 
semester hours in design, 18 semester hours in drawing and painting, 
and 15 semester hours in art electives. The culmination of the program 
will be an exhibition showing the creative power and technical ability 
of the student and a paper interpreting or outlining the nature of 
original contribution or dealing with sources, historical influences, or 
compositional problems. 

For admission to a major in creative writing, the candidate must 
have demonstrated competence and promise in writing and must have 
completed successfully at least eighteen semester hours in courses in 
English and American literature above freshman courses, and a mini- 
mum of six semester hours in courses in writing, of which three may be 
in advanced composition and three in the writing of fiction or of verse, 
or in playwriting. This major program provides for specialization in 
one of the forms of composition; the required thesis will consist of 
original work in this form together with a scholarly paper on problems 
raised by the composition. 

The major in dance provides opportunities for the graduate student 
to study and experiment in the arts with special emphasis on dance 
as a creative art form. The curriculum is designed to present experi- 
ences which will develop competency in choreography through the 
utilization of the integrated knowledge of the related arts and experi- 
mentation with various types of composition. The student is directed 
in the development of mature choreography of aesthetic merit, and in 
the attainment of technical excellence. The program culminates in a 
demonstration of the candidate's own choreography to be performed 
with a professional and scholarly solution of a theatrical and educational 
dance production. Admission to graduate study in dance is on the basis 
of competence as evidenced by the undergraduate record and a profi- 
ciency and potential in dance as demonstrated by the student. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

The graduate program in business education for the Consolidated 
University of North Carolina is centered in the Greensboro division. The 
major emphasis is on business teacher education with related subject 
matter in business and economics courses. Although primarily a 

230 



The Graduate School 

residence program, courses are offered on Saturday and in the evening 
so that, with careful scheduling, teachers in service may complete degree 
requirements in part-time study during the regular terms and through 
summer study. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the op- 
portunity to take part of their course work at the Chapel Hill division 
of the Consolidated University. 

The program is designed to prepare master teachers of business 
subjects at the secondary school level and the junior and senior college 
levels. Students may concentrate in the field of professional teacher 
education for teachers of basic business education and teachers of office 
education and the secretarial and office skills. 

Students majoring in business education may elect a program lead- 
ing to the Master of Science degree or the Master of Education degree. 
The requirements of the program leading to the Master of Science 
degree include a tool of research (language or statistics) and a thesis 
related to the student's field of major interest. 

Close relationship is maintained with the public schools of North 
Carolina and with business and industry through such organizations as 
the National Office Management Association and the Merchants' Asso- 
ciation. Students are encouraged to secure meaningful work experience 
through a co-ordinated program with business and industry. 

In addition to complying with the general regulations for uncondi- 
tional admission to the graduate program, students majoring in business 
education must have a class A certificate to teach business in North 
Carolina, or its equivalent. Also, the undergraduate credit must include 
courses in general economics and the principles of accounting. 

The major work must be distributed between professional and 
subject-matter courses with a related minor selected on the basis of 
the student's background and interest. The Master's degree in business 
education requires thirty to thirty-two semester hours' credit in ap- 
proved courses depending upon the program elected. 

EDUCATION 

Graduate study in the School of Education may lead to the degrees 
of Master of Arts or Master of Education. All degree candidates major- 
ing in Education take a general education core applicable to primary, 
intermediate, or upper grade teachers, supervisors or principals; 
elective courses in education and in subject matter areas permit a 
variety of specializations. Minors are available in the areas of art, 
business education, English, guidance, history and political science, home 
economics, music, physical education, general science, special education, 

231 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

social studies, and sociology. Other minors are available through course 
work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North 
Carolina State at Raleigh. 

The degree of Master of Education is offered as a professional 
terminal degree program for public school teachers while the degree 
of Master of Arts in Education provides a strong research emphasis for 
students working toward higher degrees. Only students who have met 
the basic teacher certification requirements of North Carolina or their 
state of residence may receive unconditional admission to the Master of 
Education curriculum. 

The School of Education also offers (in addition to the general 
education major) a program of studies with emphasis in special edu- 
cation. Completion of this program qualifies students for graduate level 
certification in North Carolina as teachers of the mentally retarded. 
Courses and seminars are also offered in the education and guidance of 
mentally gifted children. 

The facilities for graduate study in Education are excellent. There 
are a strong undergraduate major, an on-campus demonstration and 
experimental school, excellent library facilities, and cordial and co- 
operative relationships with the excellent city and county systems. 
Guilford with its two cities, Greensboro and High Point, is one of the 
most populous counties in the state. Community resources related to 
graduate study in education are unrivaled. 

ENGLISH 

In addition to the M.F.A. curriculum in writing described under the 
Creative Arts Program, the Department of English offers a program 
leading to the Master of Arts degree and a program for secondary school 
teachers leading to the degree of Master of Education. 

Candidates for the Master of Arts degree in English must complete 
thirty hours of graduate work, including a maximum of six hours allowed 
for work on the thesis. Eighteen to twenty-one hours constitute a major 
in this program; nine to twelve hours, a minor. Minors are to be chosen 
from a field related to the candidate's area of study. All candidates for 
the Master of Arts degree are required to give evidence of a reading 
knowledge of a modern foreign language. 

The major in English for candidates for the Master of Education 
degree is open to those who, in addition to meeting graduate admissions 
criteria, present an approved undergraduate background in English and 
American literature and language. They must also hold a North Carolina 
"Class A" teacher's certificate, or its out-of-state equivalent. Such 
students are required to minor in Education, and thus meet graduate 

232 



The Graduate School 

certification requirements in North Carolina. Courses in this program are 
available at times appropriate for teachers-in-service, or, with careful 
scheduling, as a full-time residence program. 

HISTORY 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro offers a program 
awarding the Master of Arts degree in history. Candidates must complete 
thirty hours of graduate work, including six hours for work on the 
thesis. Eighteen to twenty-one of the hours earned shall constitute the 
major; nine to twelve the minor. All the courses may be chosen from 
the Department of History, the student majoring in one area {e.g., 
American or European history) and minoring in the other; or a minor 
may be chosen from a related field other than history. 

All candidates for the M.A. degree are required to give evidence 
of a reading knowledge of a modern foreign language. Candidates must 
present an approved undergraduate background in history. The depart- 
ment reserves the right to require any student, whose general pre- 
paration in history it considers to be inadequate, to take additional 
courses up to six hours beyond the thirty normally required for the 
degree. 

Several of the courses in this program are also available in the 
summer and in the regular session at times of the day which are 
appropriate for persons who are employed and who wish to pursue a 
part-time program leading to the M.A. degree. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

The School of Home Economics is the center in North Carolina for 
graduate work in home economics, with regional and national recognition. 
Its graduates have entered a variety of public school and college teaching 
positions, as well as research and administrative work in business and 
industry, public service, and private institutional settings. 

The opportunities for superior training are excellent. In addition to 
the original building, there is a large and completely equipped new wing 
with facilities for graduate study and research in the several areas of 
home economics, home economics education, and institution management. 
Three home management houses and a residential lighting laboratory 
are available for research in housing and management. The new nursery 
school building serves as a center for graduate study in child develop- 
ment and family life. The homemaking cottage, which is part of the 
Curry Demonstration School program, and the dining halls on the Uni- 
versity campus in Greensboro offer unlimited facilities for coordinated 
graduate training. 

233 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

At the master's level, three graduate curricula and degrees are 
offered, each appropriate to the needs of a well-defined group of students. 
The Master of Science curriculum permits a high degree of concentra- 
tion on the knowledge and skill required for the technician, dietitian, 
administrative officer, or research worker. The student may major in 
child development and family relations, clothing and textiles, foods 
and nutrition, home economics education, or housing and management. 
The minor may be selected from any area listed above that has not been 
selected as a major, institutional management, art (related design), 
social studies, or a split minor embracing not more than two of these 
areas. Minor area sequences may be pursued at either of the two other 
branches of the Consolidated University. For the public school teacher, 
there is also offered the Master of Education based on general home 
economics, home economics education and general education; for the 
teacher who desires some research experience in addition to her teacher 
preparation, there is the Master of Science in Home Economics. The 
Master of Science in Home Economics differs from the Master of Science 
degree in that statistics may be substituted for the foreign language 
requirement. The Master of Education is a non-thesis degree with a 
major in general home economics and a minor in education. 

Courses are offered primarily for full-time resident students, 
although with special care in scheduling, teachers in service may com- 
plete the requirements for the Master's degree through Saturday and 
evening courses in the regular terms or in summer study. 

The School of Home Economics also offers a program of studies lead- 
ing to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, with major area of specializa- 
tion that of child development and family relations. Minors may be 
drawn from other areas of home economics, or from areas related to 
the major such as economics, psychology, sociology, or statistics. 

The primary goal in the doctoral program is the development of 
competent teachers, scholars, and researchers. It is felt that the pro- 
fessional school can give point and meaning to university effort at the 
highest levels of training. Although the program is patterned on the 
university model of scholarly and scientific inquiry, the needs of the 
area are such that the implications for social change are not obscured. 

Competent leaders in the field of home economics cannot rest on 
subject matter and techniques from within the field, but must be able 
to employ with distinction the attitudes and methods of inquiry of a 
number of academic areas outside home economics. The doctoral program 
involves for students intensive guided study and development in Uni- 
versity departments related but external to the School such as biology, 
chemistry, economics, the medical sciences, psychology, and the like. 
By utilizing meaningful sequences of first-line graduate work in these 

234 



The Graduate School 

areas drawn from the entire resources of the Consolidated University, 
the developing student is in better position to employ the eclectic 
approach demanded by the nature of her ultimate problems. 

The college instructor of home economics is frequently called upon 
to represent a number of relatively discrete areas within home eco- 
nomics. Strong supporting work in these several areas is available on 
the Greensboro campus of the University. 

The program is designed to provide not only a systematic review 
of the present knowledge in the field, but also to foster through guided 
study and research experience an ability to attack effectively the un- 
solved problems. The program is conducted in a climate of orderly 
search for new meanings, where students may develop the necessary 
skills and repertoire of methodology as well as a mature enthusiasm 
for the quest of knowledge. 

MUSIC 

The Graduate School offers curricula leading to two degrees in Music: 
the Master of Music degree in Applied Music and the Master of Edu- 
cation degree in Music Education. Both programs are administered by 
the School of Music. 

APPLIED MUSIC 

Prerequisites for entering the program leading to the Master of Music 
degree in Applied Music include the Bachelor of Music degree, or its 
equivalent, in the same performing area to be pursued on the graduate 
level. During the week of registration, all applicants for the degree are 
required to play an audition for the appropriate area faculty. Proficiency 
examinations in theory, music history and literature are also given 
during this period. 

Course work for the degree includes 16 hrs. in applied music (8 hrs. 
in major instrument or voice, 2 hrs. of ensemble, 2 hrs. recital, and 4 
hrs. in the literature of the instrument) ; 8 hrs. in music history and 
theory, and 6 hrs. in non-music courses on the graduate level. Total: 
30 hrs. A public recital in lieu of thesis is required. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

The graduate program in music education leads to the Master of 
Education degree. The requirements for admission to the Graduate 
School apply to this degree program. Applicants are also required to 
take special proficiency examinations administered by the School of 
Music before unconditional admission is granted. These examinations 

235 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

are established by the graduate faculty of the School of Music and cover 
areas of theory, history, and applied music. 

Students majoring in music education will generally take a minimum 
of ten semester hours in music education; eight hours in theory, history, 
and literature; four hours in applied music; and six hours in the minor 
(Education). Students are also required to submit a thesis under the 
standing regulations of the Graduate School, or present a recital in lieu 
of thesis or register for a special research seminar in which an assigned 
project in Music Education will be completed. If one of the latter two 
plans is selected, the student must take two additional hours in Theory 
or Music History and Literature. 

For further information concerning the graduate program in music, 
prospective students are invited to write the Dean of the School of 
Music. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Graduate School of the University of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro offers two master's degree curricula in the area of physical 
education, both concerned with the particular interests and needs of 
women's physical education teaching and research personnel. Specializa- 
tion is permitted in the areas of dance, sports education, recreation 
leadership, and corrective physical education. The degree of Master of 
Education is offered for those desiring to increase teaching competency 
for work in public education or in specific areas of physical education, 
and the Master of Science in Physical Education for those entering 
college teaching or research, or who are planning to continue their study 
toward the doctorate. These programs are offered primarily for full-time 
resident students in the regular terms, although it is possible to complete 
the graduate program in four or five sessions in summer residence. 

The facilities and opportunities for graduate experiences are excel- 
lent. There are two completely equipped gymnasiums, laboratories for 
graduate research and experimental study, facilities for varied teaching 
experiences on the elementary, secondary, and college levels, and oppor- 
tunities for experimentation in camping, recreation, and physical edu- 
cation for the handicapped. 

The curricula for the Master of Education and the Master of Science 
in Physical Education degrees require a minimum of thirty semester 
hours of graduate work. Candidates for the Master of Education degree 
must take a minimum of six hours in approved courses of Education, 
and six hours in an area related to physical education. Work in the 
Master of Science in Physical Education degree curriculum culminates 
in a thesis, and in the Master of Education degree, in a problem study 
in the form of a minor research project. 

236 



The Graduate School 

The Department of Physical Education also offers a program leading 
to the degree of Master of Fine Arts with major in dance. This program 
is described under the Creative Arts Program. 

EXTENSION COURSES 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro desires to render aid 
to teachers in service by arranging for courses for credit toward a 
degree or certificate, and to offer to them and to other citizens of the 
state cultural and professional courses. The state does not provide this 
service except as it may be self supporting; but afternoon or evening 
courses can be arranged at a minimum cost to persons on or off the 
campus. Television courses are also offered for credit. Lecture series 
and individual lectures by members of the faculty can be arranged. 

Most extension courses are offered at the graduate level; properly 
admitted students may count up to six hours gained in extension toward 
the Master's degree with approval of courses by their departmental 
advisers. 

Although admission to extension courses is the responsibility of 
the Director of Extension, graduate credit can be obtained only by 
students admitted to graduate status by the Graduate Dean. Students 
desiring graduate credit through extension courses who have not been 
accepted in a graduate status by the Graduate School must file formal 
application for admission and furnish satisfactory transcripts of their 
previous academic work. 

A series of conferences, usually concentrated in the summer, are 
held on the campus. These conferences are planned as a service to the 
state and as a contribution particularly to girls and women who may 
participate in them. Inquiries about the program of the Extension 
Division should be addressed to the Director of Extension, University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, N. C. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 
INSTITUTE FOR TEACHERS 

Hollis J. Rogers, Associate Professor of Biology, Director 

Beginning in 1958, the National Science Foundation has sponsored 
in-service and summer institutes for high school teachers of science. In 
the Graduate School of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
courses offered include biology, chemistry, earth sciences, mathematics, 
and physics. Taught by members of the appropriate science faculties, 
these courses are specifically designed to provide up-to-date training for 
public school science teachers. The institutes and costs for the students 
are supported by grants from the National Science Foundation. Inter- 
ested applicants should write the director for further information. 

237 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

THE RESEARCH COUNCIL OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT GREENSBORO 

An integral part of graduate study derives from original research 
and the methods of scholarly investigation. The Research Council, made 
up of appointed members of the faculty with the Dean of the Graduate 
School as Chairman, has among its functions the stimulation of research 
by members of the faculty. 

In 1957, the sum of $10,000 was made available by the General 
Assembly to Woman's College for funds in aid of research and creative 
work by members of the teaching faculty. Similar sums were made 
available each year from 1958 to 1963. These funds are administered 
by the Research Council. Since the initial year, a variety of research 
proposals, representing many different departments, have been mate- 
rially supported by grants-in-aid awarded by the Research Council. 



238 



PART IX. 



Statistical Summaries 




Eti 




..;. ^.^^X***. 



IX. STATISTICAL SUMMARIES 



ENROLLMENT SUMMARY FOR THE YEAR 1962-1963 



Senior Class 432 

Junior Class 611 

Sophomore Class 890 

Freshman Class 1037 

Commercial Students 145 

Nursing Education Students 52 

Graduate Students 462 

Special Students 95 

Total Regular Session 3724 

Extension (Inc. TV) Regular Session . 661 

Extension (Inc. TV) Summer Session 318 

Summer Session 1962 999 

TOTAL NUMBER ENROLLED .7 5703 

Curry School Enrollment— 1962-63 398 

Curry School Summer School— 1962 58 

Kindergarten & Nursery School— 1962-63 42 498 

TOTAL ENROLLMENT 1962-1963 6201 

SUMMARY OF EARNED DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

AT WOMAN'S COLLEGE ON JUNE 2, 1963 

AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT GREENSBORO 

ON JUNE 2, 1963 

Source: Commencement Program for the 71st Annual Commencement 

Doctor of Philosophy 1 

Masters of Education 56 

Masters of Science 4 

Masters of Science in Home Economics 18 

Masters of Fine Arts 9 

TOTAL GRADUATE DEGREES 88 



1 Unduplicated totals for both semesters 



241 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Bachelors of Arts 277 

Art 7 

Biology 19 

Chemistry 2 

Drama 2 

Economics 2 

Elementary Education 58 

Primary Education 41 

English 46 

French 7 

German 1 

History & Political Science 28 

Laboratory Technician * 

Mathematics 17 

Music (Organ and Flute) 3 

Physics 1 

Psychology 8 

Sociology 31 

Spanish 4 

Bachelors of Science in Home Economics 54 

Bachelors of Science in Nursing 2 

Bachelors of Science in Physical Education 9 

Bachelors of Science in Secretarial Administration 40 

Bachelors of Fine Arts 11 

Bachelors of Music 17 

TOTAL BACHELORS DEGREES 410 

TOTAL EARNED DEGREES 498 

Commercial Certificates 108 

TOTAL EARNED DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 606 



♦Reported as Biology and Chemistry Majors 

242 



PART X. 



Organization 



cr?-^S*:%-F»iPRiiiii ( , 




X. ORGANIZATION 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Terry Sanford, Governor, Chairman ex officio, Raleigh 

Arch Turner Allen, Secretary, Raleigh 

Wade Barber, Victor Bryant, Mrs. John G. Burgwyn, George Watts 
Hill, Mrs. Albert H. Lathrop, Reid A. Maynard, Rudolph L. 
Mintz, G. N. Noble, Thomas Pearsall, W. Frank Taylor, John W. 
Umstead, Jr., J. Shelton Wicker. 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Terry Sanford, Governor, Chairman, ex officio 

Charles F. Carroll, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
ex officio 

Arch Turner Allen, Secretary 

Billie Curtis, Assistant Secretary 

HONORARY LIFETIME MEMBERS 

John W. Clark, Franklinville, North Carolina 

Frank P. Graham, New York 

Gordon Gray, Washington, D. C. 

Luther H. Hodges, Washington, D. C. 

William R. Kenan, Lockport, New York 

John Motley Morehead, New York 

John W. Umstead, Jr., Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



Term Expires April 1, 1965 



Dr. Francis A. Buchanan 
Dr. Jesse B. Caldwell 
Lenox G. Cooper 
Marshall Y. Cooper 
W. Lunsford Crew 
Wilbur H. Currie 
Honorable Calvin Graves 
Mrs. Albert H. Lathrop 
Dr. John Gilmer Mebane 
Honorable Larry I. Moore 



Hendersonville 

Gastonia 

Wilmington 

Henderson 

Roanoke Rapids 

Carthage 

Winston-Salem 

Asheville 

Rutherfordton 

Wilson 



Henderson 

Gaston 

New Hanover 

Vance 

Halifax 

Moore 

Forsyth 

Buncombe 

Rutherford 

Wilson 



245 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 



Kemp B. Nixon 


Lincolnton 


Lincoln 


Arthur I. Park 


Oxford 


Granville 


Thomas J. Pearsall 


Rocky Mount 


Nash 


Clarence L. Pemberton 


Yanceyville 


Caswell 


James L. Pittman 


Scotland Neck 


Halifax 


Mrs. L. Richardson Preyer 


Greensboro 


Guilford 


H. L. Riddle, Jr. 


Morganton 


Burke 


Roy Rowe 


Burgaw 


Pender 


John P. Stedman 


Lumberton 


Robeson 


C. Lacy Tate 


Chadbourn 


Columbus 


1 Dr. John C. Tayloe 


Washington 


Beaufort 


H. P. Taylor 


Wadesboro 


Anson 


W. Frank Taylor 


Goldsboro 


Wayne 


F. E. Wallace 


Kinston 


Lenoir 


Honorable Cameron S. Weeks 


Tarboro 


Edgecombe 


Mrs. George Wilson 


Fayetteville 


Cumberland 



Term Expires April 1, 1967 



Arch T. Allen 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Mrs. Ed M. Anderson 


West Jefferson 


Ashe 


Ike F. Andrews 


Siler City 


Chatham 


William C. Barfield 


Wilmington 


New Hanover 


Mrs. J. W. Copeland 


Murfreesboro 


Hertford 


Frank Hull Crowell 


Lincolnton 


Lincoln 


Dr. Rachel Davis 


Kinston 


Lenoir 


Percy B. Ferebee 


Andrews 


Cherokee 


Bowman Gray 


Winston-Salem 


Forsyth 


Robert Hall 


Mocksville 


Davie 


Herbert Hardy 


Maury 


Greene 


William B. Harrison 


Rocky Mount 


Nash 


Mack Jernigan 


Dunn 


Harnett 


G. N. Noble 


Trenton 


Jones 


Ernest E. Parker, Jr. 


Southport 


Brunswick 


Frank Parker 


Asheville 


Buncombe 


Claude W. Rankin 


Fayetteville 


Cumberland 


T. Henry Redding 


Asheboro 


Randolph 


William P. Saunders 


Southern Pines 


Moore 


Evander S. Simpson 


Smithfield 


Johnston 


Walter L. Smith 


Charlotte 


Mecklenburg 


Dr. Shahane Taylor 


Greensboro 


Guilford 


Thomas B. Upchurch, Jr. 


Raeford 


Hoke 


C. M. Vanstory, Jr. 


Greensboro 


Guilford 


Hill Yarborough 


Louisburg 


Franklin 



246 



Trustees 



Wade Barber 
Graham W. Bell 
Victor S. Bryant 
Henry A. Foscue 
Luther Hamilton 
W. C. Harris, Jr. 
W. A. Johnson 
Robert B. Jordan, III 
Mrs. J. B. Kittrell 
J. Hanes Lassiter 
John Lassiter 
John Van Lindley 
R. Walker Martin 
C. Knox Massey 
Reid A. Maynard 
William C. Medford 
William G. Reid 
Mrs. S. L. Rodenbough 

A. Alex Shuford 

B. Atwood Skinner 
Dr. L. H. Swindell 
Ben C. Trotter 
Oscar C. Vatz 

J. S helton Wicker 
Fred L. Wilson 



Term Expires April 1 , 1 969 

Pittsboro 
Fayetteville 
Durham 
High Point 
Morehead City- 
Raleigh 
Lillington 
Mount Gilead 
Greenville 
Charlotte 
Smithfield 
Greensboro 
Lexington 
Durham 
Burlington 
Waynesville 
Pilot Mountain 
Walnut Cove 
Hickory- 
Wilson 
Washington 
Leaksville 
Fayetteville 
Sanford 
Kannapolis 



Chatham 
Cumberland 
Durham 
Guilford 
Carteret 
Wake 
Harnett 
Montgomery- 
Pitt 

Mecklenburg 
Johnston 
Guilford 
Davidson 
Durham 
Alamance 
Haywood 
Surry 
Stokes 
Catawba 
Wilson 
Beaufort 
Rockingham 
Cumberland 
Lee 
Cabarrus 



Term Expires April 1, 1971 



Wyatt R. Aydlett 
Irwin Belk 

Mrs. Mebane H. Burgwyn 
Sam N. Clark, Jr. 
T. J. Collier 
Archie K. Davis 
James C. Farthing 
Dr. Dorothy Glenn 
George Watts Hill 
Mrs. J. Henry Hill, Jr. 
Thomas H. Leath 
W. J. Lupton 
Thomas McKnight 
D. L. McMichael 
R. D. McMillan, Jr. 
Rudolph I. Mintz 



Elizabeth 

Charlotte 

Jackson 

Tarboro 

Bayboro 

Winston-Salem 

Lenoir 

Gastonia 

Durham 

Hickory 

Rockingham 

Swan Quarter 

Mooresville 

Madison 

Red Springs 

Wilmington 



Pasquotank 

Mecklenburg 

Northampton 

Edgecombe 

Pamlico 

Forsyth 

Caldwell 

Gaston 

Durham 

Catawba 

Richmond 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Rockingham 

Robeson 

New Hanover 



247 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 



Thomas 0. Moore 


Winston-Salem 


Forsyth 


Ashley M. Murphy 


Atkinson 


Pender 


Douglas M. Robinson 


Mars Hill 


Madison 


R. Glenn Stovall 


Roxboro 


Person 


Dr. David T. Tayloe 


Washington 


Beaufort 


Carl V. Venters 


Jacksonville 


Onslow 


Henry Weil 


Goldsboro 


Wayne 


Macon M. Williams 


Lenoir 


Caldwell 


George M. Good 


Camden 


Camden 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
AT GREENSBORO 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

William Clyde Friday (1951), President 

B.S. North Carolina State; LL.B., North Carolina; LL.D., Belmont Abbey, 
Wake Forest, Duke, Princeton, Elon, Davidson 

Donald Benton Anderson, Vice President for Graduate 
Studies and Research 

B.A., B.Se.Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State 

Otis Arnold Singletary (1961), Chancellor 

B.A., Millsaps; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State 

Alice Katherine Abbott (1927), Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages 

B.A., Smith; M.A., Illinois; Diploma, Centro de Estudios Historicos, Madrid 

Charles Marshall Adams (1945), Librarian, Professor 

B.A., Amherst; B.S., M.A., Columbia 

Maude Louise Adams (1937), Assistant Professor of Business 
Education, Emeritus (1956) 

B.A., Cornell College; M.A., Columbia 

Maynard Francis Adams (1962), Instructor in Education 

B.S., M.A., North Carolina State 

1 Lewis Roscoe Aiken, Jr. (1960), Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S., M.A., Florida State; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Naomi Albanese (1958) , Dean and Professor of Home Economics 

B.A., Muskingum College; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State 

Louise Brevard Alexander (1935), Professor of Political Science, 
Emeritus (1956) 

B.A., Presbyterian 

Margaret Newell Alexander (1960), Instructor in Health 

B.S., Kentucky; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina 

Donald Floyd Allen (1962), Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., North Texas State; M.A., Ph.D., Texas 



1 Leave of absence, 1963- 



248 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Roscoe Jackson Allen (1956) , Head and Associate Professor of 
Commercial Studies 

B.S., Concord College; M.S., Tennessee; Ed.D., Pennsylvania State 

Laura Gaddes Anderton (1948) , Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Wellesley; M.S., Brown; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Nancy Kay Angle (1963) , Instructor in Physical Education 

B.A., San Jose State College; M.S., Washington 

Eugene John Aromi, Jr. (1961), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern; M.A., Ed.D., Alabama 

Elizabeth Edna Arundel (1937), Professor of Geography, 
Emeritus (1960) 

B.A., Ohio; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Yale 

Warren Hinds Ashby (1949), Head and Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Maryville; B.D., Ph.D., Yale 

James Carroll Atkinson (1958), Assistant Professor of Romance 
Languages 

B.A., M.A., Duke; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

iCLAiRE Henley Atkinson (1917), Assistant Professor of Music, 
Emeritus (1962) 

B.M., North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College; Columbia; pupil of 
Karl Bondam, Austin Conradi and Lotta Hough 

Mary Elizabeth Avent (1952) , Instructor in Education 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., 
George Peabody 

Anne Frances Baecker (1960), Head and Associate Professor of 
German 

B.A., Marygrove; M.A., Michigan; Ph.D., Cincinnati 

Richard Bardolph (1944), Head and Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Illinois 

Elizabeth McDaniel Barineau (1961), Professor of Romance 
Languages 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago 

Barbara Ann Barksdale (1963), Instructor in History 

B.A., Duke; M.A., North Carolina 

Susan Elizabeth Barksdale (1943), Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., Columbia 

Elva Eudora Barrow (1916), Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus (1954) 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.S., Chicago 

Helen Barton (1927), Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus (1960) 

B.A., Goucher; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

Helen Davie Bedon (1962), Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Meredith; M.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., Cornell 



iPart time. 

249 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
John Herbert Beeler (1950), Associate Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Ohio; Ph.D., Cornell 

Edmund Berkeley (1960), Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., Virginia; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Charles Daniels Blend (1962), Head and Professor of Romance 
Languages 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State; Faculte des Lettres, Universite D'Aix-Marseille 

Alice Crowthers Boehret (1957), Head and Assistant Professor of 

Nursing Education 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.S., Pennsylvania; 
Diploma, Jefferson Hospital 

Elizabeth Ann Bowles (1956), Instructor in Education 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., North Carolina 

John Hibbs Brasher (1957), Lecturer in Economics 

B.A., B.S., M.A., Florida 

!Lucy Moore Brashear (1961), Instructor in English 

B.A., B.S., M.A., Florida 

Betsy Ruth Brown (1962), Instructor in Education 

B.A., High Point; M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

John Elbert Bridgers, Jr. (1938) , Professor of English 

B.A., Duke; M.A., Harvard; Ph.D., Duke 

Joseph Allen Bryant (1961), Head and Professor of English 

B.A., West Kentucky Teachers; M.A., Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Yale 

Frances Buchanan (1960), Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., Winthrop; M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

2 Jean Ruth Buchert (1957), Associate Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Missouri; Ph.D., Yale 

Margaret Elaine Burgess (1960), Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Washington State; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Helen Catherine Burns (1937), Associate Professor 

B.A., Iowa; M.A., Columbia 

William Wyeburg Burton (1961), Teaching Assistant, Education 

B.A., Guilford 

May Dulaney Bush (1934), Professor of English 

B.A., Hollins; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

Iva Fric Cagigao (1960) , Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., Washington; M.A., Middlebury 

Martha Helen Canaday (1958), Associate Professor of Home 
Economics 

B.S., Texas State College for Women; M.S., Louisiana State 

Gilbert Frederic Carpenter (1963), Head and Professor of Art 

B.A., Stanford 



*Part time, 1963-64. 
2 Leave of absence, 1963-64. 



250 



Faculty 
Jane Helen Carroll (1963), Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., Guilford; M.A., Duke 

iGiORGio Cavallon (1964), Lecturer in Art 

American Academy of Art 

Amy Marie Charles (1956), Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Westminster; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

Mauricio Eduardo Charpenel (1959), Instructor in Romance 
Languages 

B.A., Central Missouri State; M.A., Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico 

Rubye Faye Cherry (1963), Instructor in Nursing Education 

B.S., Virginia; M.A. Columbia 

Converse Dilworth Clowse (1962), Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Vermont; Ph.D. Northwestern 

Betty Carol Clutts (1959), Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., 
North Carolina; Ph.D., Ohio State 

William Patrick Colbert (1962), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Winona State; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia 

Esther Inez Coldwell (1922), Associate Professor of Biology, 
Emeritus (1961) 

B.A., Southwestern 

James Glenn Collier, Jr. (1962), Instructor in English 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina 

Euth Mary Collings (1925), Physician and Professor of Health, 
Emeritus (1962) 

B.A., Pomona; M.D., Pennsylvania 

Elizabeth Perrin Collins (1961), Instructor in Commercial Studies 

B.S., Alabama State College for Women; M.Ed., Woman's College of the 
University of North Carolina 

Owen Sergeson Connelly, Jr. (1961), Assistant Professor of History 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., North Carolina 

John Philip Couch (1958), Assistant Professor of Romance 
Languages 

B.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., Yale 

2 M. Thomas Cousins (1963), Lecturer in Music 

Special Studies at Julliard 

Elizabeth Cowling (1945), Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Carleton; M.A., Columbia; M.M., Northwestern; studied with Dudley 
Powers, Luigi Silva, Pablo Casals 

Richard Garner Cox (1960), Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina; Diploma, Conservatoire national de la musique, 
Paris, France; Ph.D., Northwestern 



x Part time, 2nd semester. 
2 Part time, 1963-64. 



251 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
iMRS. E. Frances Crimm (1964), Lecturer in Art 

B.A., South Carolina; M.A., Columbia 

Rose Isabel Cude (1962), Instructor in Education 

B.S., East Carolina; M.Ed. Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

2 Lois Jotter Cutter (1963), Lecturer in Biology 

B.A., M.S., Michigan; Ph.D., 

Helen Frances Cutting (1931), Assistant Professor of Romance 
Languages, Emeritus (1962) 

B.A., Adelphi; M.A., Columbia; M.A., Chicago; Certificate, Centro de Estudios 
Historicos, Madrid; M.S.L.S., Catholic University of America 

Dorothy Scott Darnell (1960), Instructor in Business Education 

B.S.S.A., M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Robert Arthur Darnell (1949), Associate Professor of Music 

B.M., Colorado; M.M., Texas; Certificate, Ecoles des Beaux Arts, Fountainebleau, 
France; pupil of Robert Casadesus, Carl Friedburg, Nadia Boulanger 

David Glynn Davies (1962), Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., Oberlin; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Dorothy Davis (1930), Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., Western College; M.A., Wisconsin 

Charlotte Webster Dawley (1944), Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Carleton; M.S., Washington University; Ph.D., Minnesota 

Savannah Seagraves Day (1953), Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics 

B.S., Appalachian; M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Eunice Minerva Deemer (1963), Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics 

B.S., Indiana; M.Ed., Pennsylvania 

Marie B. Denneen (1926), Associate Professor of Education, 
Emeritus (1956) 

B.A., M.A., Minnesota 

William Conrad DeVeny (1946), Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., North Central; B.Mus., Oberlin Conservatory 

Margaret Claire DeVinny (1946), Assistant Professor of 
Commercial Studies 

B.S., Kansas State; M.S., Tennessee 

Mary Andrews Dickey (1957), Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.S., Tennessee 

George Wdlliam Dickieson (1938), Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Salem; M.Mus., Cincinnati Conservatory; 1'Ecole Monteux 

Mary Taylor Dicks (1955), Instructor in Home Economics 

B.A., East Carolina; M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 



*Part time 2nd semester. 
2Part time, 1963-64. 



252 



Faculty 
Arthur Wilson Dixon (1957), Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., Yale 

Craig Lanier Dozier (1960), Head and Associate Professor of 
Geography 

B.A., Wisconsin; M.A., Maryland; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

Bernice Evelyn Draper (1922), Professor of History, Emeritus (1960) 

B.A., Lawrence; M.A., Wisconsin 

LaMyra H. Duckworth (1963), Teaching Fellow, Home Economics 

B.A., Wesleyan; M.S., Alabama 

Elizabeth Duffy (1937), Professor of Psychology 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

iMARGARET Calvert Duncan (1962), Instructor in Physical Education 
and Resident Supervisor of Piney Lake 

B.A., Duke; M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

James Arthur Dunn (1923), Professor of English, Emeritus (1953) 

B.A., M.A., Missouri 

Frances Yeager Dunham (1962), Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Ph.D., Duke 

Bruce MacLean Eberhart (1963), Head and Professor of Biology 

B.A., San Jose State; Ph.D., Stanford 

Lois Virginia Edinger (1962), Instructor in Education 

B.A., Meredith; M.Ed., Ph.D., North Carolina 

2 Margaret Edwards (1933), Professor of Home Economics, Emeritus 
(1951) 

B.S., Montana State; M.A., Columbia 

Deborah Eibel (1963), Instructor in English 

B.A., McGill; M.A., Radcliffe 

James Nelson Ellis (1963), Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Oklahoma; Ph.D., Texas 

Daniel Ericourt (1963) , Lecturer in Music 

Paris Conservatory 

Kathryn McAllister England (1942), Associate Professor of Drama 
and Speech 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.A., Columbia 

Virginia Christian Farinholt (1935), Professor of Romance 
Languages 

B.A., William and Mary; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago 

William Norcross Felt (1947), Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages 

B.A., Clark; M.A., D.M.L., Middlebury; Diplome de hautes etudes, Grenoble 



iPart time 1963-64. 
2Deceased March 10, 1963. 



253 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
Marguerite Felton (1956), Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Limestone; M.A., North Carolina 

James Sharbrough Ferguson (1962), Professor of History 

B.A., Millsaps; M.A., Louisiana State; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Robert Louis Fiore (1962), Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., Iona; M.A., Middlebury 

Mary Fitzgerald (1924), Assistant Professor of Education, Emeritus 
(1953) 

Diploma, North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College; B.A., North 
Carolina College for Women; M.A., Columbia 

Ruth Fitzgerald (1905), Professor of Education, Emeritus (1950) 

Diploma, North Carolina College for Women; B.S., M.A., Columbia 

iSHiRLEY Katherine Flynn (1963), Instructor in Health 

B.S., M.S., MacMurray 

Sherri Rhoda Forrester (1962), Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Ph.D., Duke; Ph.D., Northwestern 

Josephine Alexander Foster (1959), Teaching Fellow, Home 
Economics 

B.S., M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

John G. Frank (1963), Lecturer in German and Russian 

Ph.D., Munich; Ph.D., Michigan 

Marian Pope Franklin (1959), Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., B.M.„ St. Olaf; M.A., Northwestern; Ed.D., North Carolina 

iRosE Mills Freedman (1957), Instructor in Home Economics 

B.A., Vassar; M.A., George Peabody 

Maynard Gardner French (1957) , Assistant Professor of Drama 

B.A., Maine; M.A., M.F.A., Western Reserve; Certificate, School of Radio and 
Television Techniques, New York City 

William Herbert Friedman (1963), Lecturer in Psychology 

B.A., Kansas; M.A., Connecticut 

1 Annie Beam Funderburk (1921), Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages, Emeritus (1961) 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women; M.A., North Carolina 

Jean Elisabeth Gagen (1954), Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia 

Lois Kathleen Galer (1960), Instructor in Nursing Education 

B.S., Hamline University; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 

June Priscilla Galloway (1957), Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Georgia; M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Virginia Beatrice Gangstad (1939), Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Illinois 



*Part time, 1963- 

254 



Faculty 
Edward Foote Gardner (1962) , Instructor in Physics 

B.S., Dickinson; M.S., Pennsylvania State 

!Kate Baucom Garner (1959), Research Instructor in Home 
Economics 

B.S., Tift; M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Mildred Rutherford Gould (1921), Associate Professor of English 
Emeritus (1951) 

B.S., M.A., Columbia 

Margaret Ann Greene (1946), Assistant Professor of Physical 
Education 

B.S., Appalachian; M.A., New York 

Ellen Jeanne Griffin (1940), Associate Professor of Physical 
Education 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., North 
Carolina 

George Philip Grill (1963), Instructor in Business Education 

B.S., M.A., Appalachian 

Mortimer Martin Guiney, Jr. (1958) Instructor in Romance 
Languages 

B.A., Colby College; M.A., Middlebury 

Magnhilde Gullander (1918) , Prof essor of History, Emeritus (1956) 

B.A., Wisconsin; M.A., Pennsylvania 

Ruth Gunter (1931), Assistant Professor of Education, Emeritus 
(1959) 

B.A., North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College; B.A., North Carolina 
College for Women; M.A., Columbia 

James Joseph Hagood, Jr. (1951), Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., Piedmont; M.A., George Peabody; M.S., Illinois 

Alonzo C. Hall (1916), Professor of English, Emeritus (1956) 

B.A., Elon; M.A., Columbia 

Earl B. Hall (1923), Professor of Biology, Emeritus (1947) 

B.S., M.S., Chicago 

Mathilde Hardaway (1941), Associate Professor of Business 
Education 

B.B.A., Texas; M.B.A., Chicago; Ph.D., Yale 

Noma Hardin (1944) , Associate Professor of Art 

B.A., Baylor; B.S., M.A., Texas State College for Women 

Rene Hardre (1925), Professor of Romance Languages Emeritus 
(1958) 

C.E.N., Angers; C.A.P., Rennes; Professor des Ecoles Normales, Paris 

Hilda T. Harpster (1944), Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Sweet Briar; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan 



iPart time 1963-64. 

255 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

x Mary Harrington Harrell (1935), Associate Professor of 
Commercial Studies, Emeritus (1961) 

B.A., Queens; B.S., George Peabody; M.A., New York 

Mildred Pearl Harris (1924), Associate Professor of Health, 
Emeritus (1956) 

B.A., M.A., Michigan 

Helen Joan Hartwtg (1962), Instructor in English 

B.S., Northwestern; M.A., Florida 

Martha Elizabeth Hathaway (1936), Associate Professor of Home 
Economics 

B.S., North Carolina College for Women; M.A., Columbia 

Elma Josephine Hege (1934), Associate Professor of History 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women; M.A., Virginia 

2 Ruth Colton Hege (1960), Instructor in English 

B.A., Mount Holyoke; M.A., Columbia 

3 Julia Heil Heinlein (1952), Associate Professor of Psychology, 
Emeritus (1962) 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

Shirley Leona Henkel (1960), Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S.H.E., M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Gail Murl Hennis (1950), Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Purdue; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa 

Paul Arnold Hickfang (1962), Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., Texas; M.M., Michigan 

James Albert Highsmith (1916), Professor of Psychology, Emeritus 
(1953) 

B.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., Peabody 

William John Hilbrink (1962), Instructor in Music 

B.M.Ed., Baldwin-Wallace; M.M., Eastman School of Music 

Daniel Franklin Hobbs, Jr. (1962), Associate Professor of Home 
Economics 

A.A., Graceland; B.S., M.S., Florida State; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 

Birdie Helen Holloway (1935), Professor of Music 

B.S.M., M.S.M., Oberlin Conservatory 

Malcolm King Hooke (1922), Professor of Romance Languages, 
Emeritus (1958) 

B.A., Chattanooga; Diplome d'etudes de civilisation frangaise 
Docteur de l'Universite de Paris 

Kenneth Edwin Howe (1958), Dean and Professor of Education 

B.A., Eastern Michigan University; M.S., Michigan; Ed.D., Northwestern 



*Part time first semester. 
2Part time, 1963-64. 
3 Vocational Counselor, 1963- 



256 



Faculty 

Evelyn Louise Howell (1937), Associate Professor of Home 
Economics, Emeritus (1956) 

B.S., M.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Hilda Martha Huebner (1963), Instructor in Nursing Education 

B.S., M.A., Columbia 

Margaret Agnes Hunt (1961), Instructor in Political Science 

B.A., Michigan State; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina 

Eugenia McIver Hunter (1935), Professor of Education 

B.A., Goucher; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Ohio State 

Mary Alford Hunter (1943), Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., North 
Carolina 

3 Helen Margaret Ingraham (1923), Professor of Biology, Emeritus 
(1960) 

B.S., Knox; M.S., Chicago 

Grace Robbins James (1962) , Instructor in Education 

B.A., Meredith; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina 

!Randall Jarrell (1947), Professor of English 

B.S., M.A., Vanderbilt 

Eula Mae Carter Jarrett (1957), Instructor in Education and 
Librarian in Curry School 

B.A., Kentucky 

Elisabeth Anna Marie Jastrow (1941), Associate Professor of Art, 
Emeritus (1961) 

Ph.D., Heidelburg, Germany 

Carol Johnson (1959), Lecturer in English 

B.A., St. Catherine; M.A., Marquette; M.F.A., Iowa 

Dagmar Hildegarde Johnson (1959), Stone Professor of Home 
Economics 

B.S., M.S., Minnesota; Ph.D., Iowa State 

Clenn R. Johnson (1923), Professor of Sociology, Emeritus (1954) 

B.A., Reed; M.A., Columbia 

2 Mary Kennon Johnson (1962) , Instructor in Education 

B.A., South Carolina 

M. School Librarianship, North Carolina 

Joan Ash Jones (1959), Instructor in Education 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.Ed. Temple 

Joseph Donald Jones (1960), Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., Hampden-Sydney; M.A., North Carolina 

Sarah Wilson Jones (1952), Instructor in Business Education 

B.S., M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 



1 Leave of absence, first semester. 
2 Part time, 1963-64. 
3 Deceased January 27, 1964. 



257 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
George Minor Joyce (1935), Professor 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers; M.S., Indiana 

Katsushige Kazaoka (1963), Instructor in Psychology 

B.S., Juniata M.A., DePauw 

Pauline Evelyn Keeney (1949), Burlington Industries Professor of 
Textiles 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 

John Daniel Kehoe (1957), Assistant Professor of Art 

B.F.A., Wayne; M.A., Michigan 

Albert S. Keister (1924), Professor of Economics, Emeritus (1956) 

B.A., Otterbein; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Chicago 

John Wesley Kennedy (1956), Head and Professor of Economics 

B.A., M.A., Duke; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Grace McCarthy Keziah (1961), Instructor in History 

B.A., Syracuse; M.A., Pennsylvania 

ViRA Rodgers Kivett (1960), Research Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

William Elliott Knox (1963), Instructor in Sociology 

B.A., Colgate 

Jean-Paul F. X. Koenig (1962), Teaching Assistant, Romance 
Languages 

2 Baccalaureats — Aix-Marseille University (Tananarive, Madagascar Branch) 
Mention Bien Certificate — Tananarive 

Sarah Woodruff Korn (1960), Instructor in Nursing Education 

Diploma, Pennsylvania Hospital School of Nursing; B.S., Pennsylvania; M.A., 
Teachers College, Columbia 

Paraskevi Kouzoudjoglou (1963), Instructor in Romance Languages 

Diploma, University of Lille; Professorat, French Institute, Athens 

Anna Mary Kreimeier (1927) , Assistant Professor of Education 

Ph.B., Chicago; M.A., Columbia 

Harriet Jane Kupferer (1961), Assistant Professor of Sociology 
and Anthropology 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., Ed.D., 
New York; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Jordan Emil Kurland (1956), Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Boston University 

1 Lincoln F. Ladd (1963), Instructor in English 

B.A., Brown; M.A., Virginia 

Francis Anthony Laine (1949), Head and Associate Professor of 
Classical Civilization 

B.S., Memphis State; Ph.D., Vanderbilt 

Frank Richard LaMar (1962), Instructor in Music 

B.M., M.M., D.Mus., Florida State 



J Part time, 1963- 

258 



Faculty 

Betty Aiken Land (1923), Assistant Professor of Education, Emeritus 
(1945) 

Diploma, North Carolina College for Women; M.A., Columbia 

Vera Ione Largent (1923), Professor of History, Emeritus (1961) 

B.A., Knox; M.A., Chicago 

Augustine LaRochelle (1922), Professor of Romance Languages, 
Emeritus (1958) 

B.A., Vermont; M.A., Columbia; Diploma, Centro de Estudios Historicos, Madrid 

Giraudet Lay (1963), Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.Ph., Paris; Certificate, Lycee Racine 

David Carson Leaird (1962), Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., M.A., Auburn 

Marjorie Louise Leonard (1941), Associate Professor of Physical 
Education 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., North 
Carolina 

Anne Louise Lewis (1945) , Head and Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.S., Ph.D., Chicago 

Virgil E. Lindsey (1940), Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Missouri Wesleyan; M.A., Iowa 

Mary Martha Lineberger (1963), Teacher of Mathematics 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Vance Thomas Littlejohn (1938), Head and Professor of Business 
Education 

B.A., B.S., Bowling Green; M.Ed., Ph.D., Pittsburgh 

Charlotte Clarke Locke (1960), Teaching Assistant, Health 

B.A., Bates; Certificate in Public Health, Simmons 

3 JOHN C. Lockhart (1943), Business Manager, Emeritus (1957) 

B.A., North Carolina 

x Edward Loewenstein (1957), Lecturer in Art 

B. Arch., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Lila Belle Love (1926), Associate Professor of Biology, Emeritus 
(1953) 

B.A., Mississippi State College for Women; M.S., Nebraska 

Emma Louise Lowe (1941), Associate Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., M.S., Georgia State 

Harold Talmadge Luce (1959), Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., Butler; M.M., Ph.D., Florida State 

Walter T. Luczynski (1960), Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., New York; M.A., Michigan; Ph.D., Illinois 

^Herbert Lund (1954), Lecturer in Biology 

B.A., Utah; M.D., Pennsylvania 

1 Part time, second semester. 
2 Part time, 1963-64. 
3 Deceased February 12, 1964. 



259 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
Paul Eugene Lutz (1961), Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Lenoir Rhyne; M.S., Miami; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Anna Madeline McCain (1953), Assistant Professor of Health 

B.A., East Carolina; M.P.H., North Carolina 

Miriam McFadyen (1927), Professor of Education, Emeritus (1945) 

Diploma, North Carolina College for Women; B.S., M.S., Columbia 

Rosemary McGee (1954), Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Southwest Texas; M.S., Illinois State; Ph.D., Iowa 

Franklin Holbrook McNutt (1941), Professor of Education, Emeritus 
(1958) 

B.A., M.A., Wittenberg; Ph.D., Ohio State; LL.D., Dayton; L.H.D., Wittenberg 

Aden Combs Magee, III (1960), Associate Research Professor of Home 
Economics 

B.S., Texas A and M; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State 

Gay Grant Manchester (1953), Instructor in Education 

B.A., Lenoir Rhyne; M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Lenita Manry (1963), Teacher in Art 

B.S., Columbia University 

Guita Marble (1940), Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Kansas 

Ethel Loraline Martus (1931) , Head and Professor of Physical 
Education 

B.A., Brown; M.S., Wellesley 

Natividad Masanes (1963), Lecturer in Romance Languages 

License of Philosophy in Letters, Barcelona University; Journalism degree, 
Official School of Journalism, Barcelona 

Ruth Weisgerber Maynard (1962), Teaching Assistant, Education 

B.S., Guilford 

John J. Meacham (1963), Instructor in Music 

B.M., M.M., Northwestern 

Harriett Elizabeth Mehaffie (1929), Assistant Professor of 
Education, Emeritus (1962) 

Ph.B., Chicago; M.A., Michigan 

Margaret Meriwether (1960), Instructor in Classical Civilization 

B.A., South Carolina; M.A., Yale 

Herman David Middleton (1956), Head and Associate Professor of 
Drama and Speech 

B.S., Columbia; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 

!Jose Enrique C. Miguens (1964), John Hay Whitney Visiting 
Scholar, Sociology and Anthropology 

B.A., Champagnat College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Buenos Aires 



1 Second semester. 

260 



Faculty 
Helen Pierce Miller (1962), Instructor in Education 

B.A., High Point; M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Meta Helena Miller (1922), Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Goucher; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins; Certificat d'etudes pratiques de 
prononciation francaise Institut de phonetique, Universite de Paris 

Alleine Richard Minor (1913), Professor of Music, Emeritus (1956) 

Diploma, Meredith; B.S., Columbia; New England Conservatory of Music 

Jane Tucker Mitchell (1958), Instructor in Education 

B.A., Mary Baldwin; M.A., George Washington 

Vdiginia Grove Moomaw (1945), Associate Professor of Physical 
Education 

B.S., Nebraska; M.A., Columbia; Bennington Mills, New York Studios of Martha 
Graham; study with Charles Weidman, Doris Humphrey, and Jose Limon; Dance 
Notation Bureau 

George Arlington Moore (1962), Instructor in English 

B.A., M.A., Kentucky 

Inga Borgstrom Morgan (1946), Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., M.M., Eastman; study with Max Landow and Orazio Frugoni 

Edwin Phillip Morgan (1946), Associate Professor of Music 

B.M., Tulsa; M.M., Eastman; study with Helen Ringo, Guy Maier, Max Landow, 
Egon Petri, Jose Echanzi 

Ralph Michael Morrison (1960), Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., College of William and Mary; Ph.D., Indiana 

Sadie Mull Moser (1955), Instructor in Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Mereb Ethna Mossman (1937), Dean of the College and 
Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Morningside; M.A., Chicago; L.H.D., Queens College 

Mildred Pendleton Newton (1926), Director of Admissions, Emeritus 
(1959) 

B.A., Goucher 

Thomas E. Niedrienghaus (1963), Instructor in Geography 

B.A., Kalamazoo; M.A., Michigan 

Victoria Carlson Nielson (1930), Professor of Health, Emeritus 
(1948) 

Charles Donald Noblin (1963), Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Mississippi; M.S., College of William and Mary; Ph.D., Louisiana State 

James Watson Painter (1926), Professor of English, Emeritus 
(1962) 

B.A., Emory and Henry; M.A., Tennessee 

Kathleen Sharer Painter (1929), Instructor in English, Emeritus 

B.A., Tennessee 

Herbert Park (1936), Instructor in Education, Emeritus (1959) 

Springfield; Columbia 



261 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
Franklin Dallas Parker (1951), Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Greenville; M.A., Ph.D., Illinois 

May Crookes Parrish (1959), Instructor in Education 

B.A., M.Ed., "Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

iRoBERT Edwards Partin (1957), Associate Professor of Art 

B.A., California; M.F.A., Columbia 

Jessie Clara Peden (1946) , Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., "Winthrop; M.A., North Carolina 

Margaret Ellen Penn (1946), Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Kansas State Teachers; M.A., Columbia 

Charlotte Perkins (1960), Instructor in Speech 

B.A., M.A., Louisiana State 

Mollie Ann Peterson (1921), Associate Professor of Art, Emeritus 
(1943) 

Ph.B., Chicago; M.A., Columbia 

Eugene Edwin Pfaff (1936), Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., Cornell 

Bernice Maxine Phillips (1963), Instructor in English 

B.A., M.A., Alabama 

2 Charles Wiley Phillips (1935), Director of Extension and 
Professor, Emeritus (1962) 

B.A., North Carolina; M.A., Columbia 

Lenore Gerlene Pierce (1955), Instructor in Commercial Studies 

B.A., Milligan; M.A., Ed.S., George Peabody 

VrvA M. Playfoot (1925), Professor of Home Economics, Emeritus 
(1954) 

B.S., M.A., Columbia 

Nancy Ann Porter (1952), Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

3 Charles Edward Prall (1949), Professor of Education, Emeritus 
(1958) 

B.A., Iowa; M.A., Chicago; Ph.D., Iowa 

4 Anne Powell (1963), Instructor in English 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., Boston 

Rosamond Putzel (1956), Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Salem; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina 

William Samuel Ray (1960), Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Bridgewater; M.A., Ph..D, Maryland 

Anna Joyce Reardon (1941) , Head and Professor of Physics 

B.A., College of Saint Teresa; M.S., Ph.D., St. Louis 



x Leave of absence, 1963-64. 

2 Part time Assistant to Director of Development, 1963-64. 

3 Deceased February 2, 1964. 

*Part time 1963-64. 



262 



Faculty 

Anna Reger (1931), Assistant Professor of Education, Emeritus 
(1959) 

B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan; B.S. in L.S., Columbia 

Frederick M. Rener (1961), Assistant Professor of German 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Toronto 

Clara Ann Ridder (1959) , Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Nebraska; M.S., Arizona; Ph.D., Cornell 

Lee Rigsby (1959) , Dean and Professor of Music 

B.M., M.M.. Texas; Ph.D., Michigan 

Marie Iris Riley (1963), Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., State Teachers College, New York; M.A., Iowa; Ph.D., Florida State 

Blackwell Pierce Robinson (1956), Associate Professor of History 

B.A., North Carolina; M.A., Duke; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Martin Roeder (1954), Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Queens College, New York; M.S., New Mexico; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Hollis Jetton Rogers (1947), Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Murray State; M.S., Kentucky; Ph.D., Duke 

Bess Naylor Rosa (1934), Associate Professor of Home Economics, 
Emeritus (1958) 

B.S., M.A., Missouri 

James P. Rose (1963), Instructor in Drama 

B.A., Antioch; M.F.A., Yale 

Robert Bernard Rosthal (1961), Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson; M.A., Chicago; Ph.D., Michigan 

Corinne Britton Royster (1962), Instructor in Education 

B.A., East Carolina 

Arthur J. Ruebel (1963), Assistant Professor of Sociology and 
Anthropology 

B.A., Mexico City; M.A., Chicago; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Donald William Russell (1955), Professor of Education 

B.A., Bates; M.Ed., Ed.D., Boston University 

Sarah Sands (1958) , Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Salem; M.T., Bowman Gray; M.S., Tennessee 

Margaret H. Saunders (1963), Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A., Southwestern; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

Florence Louise Schaeffer (1922), Head and Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Barnard; M.A., Mount Holyoke 

Alice Schriver (1949), Professor of Health 

B.S., M.A., New York; Ed.D., Columbia 

Norman Willard Schul (1961), Assistant Professor of Geography 

B.S.Ed., M.A., Miami; Ph.D., Syracuse 



263 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
iELiZABETH C. Scott (1963), Instructor in Commercial Studies 

B.S.S.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

2 Bernard Schmidt (1964), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., Freie Universitat in Berlin; Ph.D., Indiana University 

John Popham Sedgwick, Jr. (1961), Professor of Art 

B.A., Williams; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard 

Esther Segner (1955), Associate Professor of Home Economics, 
Emeritus (1958) 

B.S., Wisconsin; M.S., Minnesota 

William C. Seifrit, Jr. (1963), Instructor in Drama 

B.A., Fairmont; M.A., Ohio 

Archie D. Shaftesbury (1924), Professor of Zoology, Emeritus (1959) 

B.A., Southwestern; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

Anne Christian Shamburger (1925), Assistant Professor of Health 

Guilford; Johns Hopkins 

Chiranji Lal Sharma (1963), Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Agra; M.A., Muslim; Ph.D., Chicago; Ph.D., London 

Ruth Agnes Shaver (1937), Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan; M.A., Columbia 

3 Harry George Shipman (1962), Lecturer in Music 

B.A., M.E., North Carolina 

^Clarence Olan Shipton (1955), Dean of Men and Instructor in 
Education 

B.A., Elon College; M.Ed. North Carolina 

Lyda Gordon Shivers (1933), Head and Professor of Sociology 
and Anthropology 

B.A., LL.B., M.A., Mississippi; Ph.D., North Carolina 

Jeanette Dorothy Sievers (1957), Assistant Professor of 
Business Education 

B.A., State College of Washington; M.S., Simmons 

Emeve Paul Singletary (1959), Teaching Assistant, Home Economics 

B.S.H.E., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; Diploma in 
Dietetics, Medical College of Virginia 

Otis Arnold Singletary (1961) , Professor of History 

B.A., Millsaps; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State 

John Aaron Smith (1927), Associate Professor of Education, 
Emeritus (1954) 

B.Ed., Illinois State Normal; M.S., Illinois 

Kendon Rasey Smith (1954) , Head and Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Minnesota, M.A., Ph.D., Princeton 

*Part time, first semester. 
2 Second semester. 
8 Part time, 1963-64. 
^Effective February 1, 1964. 



264 



Faculty 

Lou Ann Smith (1961), Instructor in Art 

B.F.A., Georgia; M.F.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Rebecca McCulloch Smith (1958), Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

*Ruby Bass Smith (1963), Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A., M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Tommie Lou Smith (1951), Assistant Professor of Business Education 

B.A., M.A., East Carolina 

2 William D. Snider (1963), Lecturer in English 

B.A., North Carolina 

Joann Sandra Spahr (1959), Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

Irwin Vincent Sperry (1955) , Professor of Home Economics and 
Director of Child and Family Development Institute 

B.A., Michigan State Normal; M.Ed., Ed.D., Wayne 

Jonathan Warner Spurgeon (1962), Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Harvard; M.S., Ph.D., Wisconsin 

Helen Knott Staley (1949), Associate Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., M.A., Columbia 

John Luther Steinmetz (1961), Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., U. S. Coast Guard Academy; M.A., Duke 

Robert Oren Stephens (1961), Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Texas A. and I.; M.A., Ph.D., Texas 

2 Virginia Jones Stephens (1961), Instructor in Sociology 

B.A., Meredith; M.S., Texas 

Madeleine Blakey Street (1930) , Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., William and Mary; M.A., Columbia 

Vergie Lee Stringer (1958), Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S.H.E., Mississippi Southern; M.S., Tennessee 

Jane Summerell (1926), Professor of English, Emeritus (1958) 

B.A., North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College; B.A., North Carolina 
College for Women; M.A., Columbia 

Katherine Henrietta Taylor (1929) , Dean of Students and Professor 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women; M.A., Radcliffe 

2 Peter Hillsman Taylor (1963), Professor of English 

B.A., Kenyon 

William Raymond Taylor (1921), Professor of English, Emeritus 
(1960) 

B.A., North Carolina M.A., Harvard 



*First semester 1963-64. 
2Part time, 1963-64. 



265 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
iGEORGE Martin Thompson (1923), Professor of Music, Emeritus 

B.Mus., M.Mus., Beaver; Pittsburgh Musical Institute, Chicago College of Music; 
pupil of Clarence Eddy of Chicago and Joseph Bonnet of Paris 

Mary Ruth Thompson (1963), Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S.H.E., M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Helen Alverda Thrush (1939), Professor of Art 

B.F.A., Pennsylvania; M.A., Columbia 

Nettie Sue Tillett (1924), Professor of English, Emeritus (1958) 

B.A., Duke; M.A., Columbia 

Joanne Charlotte Tontz (1962), Instructor in Biology 

BA., Randolph-Macon; M.A., North Carolina 

James Ewing Tucker (1959), Curator and Instructor in Art 

B.F.A., Texas; M.F.A., Iowa 

William Madison Tucker (1962), Instructor in English 

B.A., Wofford; M.A., Vanderbilt 

Adele Celeste Ulrich (1956), Associate Professor of Physical 
Education 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., North 
Carolina; Ph.D., Southern California 

Herbert Eugene Vaughn, Jr. (1948), Professor of Education 

B.S., Wofford; M.A., George Peabody 

Lucy Fairfax Vaughn (1962) , Instructor in Education 

B.S., Houston; M.A., Kent State 

2 Sarah Daniel Vaughan (1959), Teacher in Education 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., Peabody 

Gertrude Vermillion (1957), Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Furman; B.S., George Peabody; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Duke 

Tony Vevers (1963), Lecturer in Art 

B.A., Yale 

Rebecca Freeman Wagoner (1962), Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S.H.E., M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Fanny Baker Walton (1963), Instructor in English 

B.S., M.A., Appalachian 

Emily Holmes Watkins (1926), Professor of Mathematics, 
Emeritus (1958) 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.A., Columbia 

Robert Winthrop Watson (1953), Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Williams; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

1 Philip M. Webster (1964), Lecturer in Economics 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Wisconsin 



J Part time, second semester. 
2Part time, 1963-64. 



266 



Faculty 
Sharon Hart Welker (1959), Instructor in Education 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.Ed., North 
Carolina 

Rowena Wellman (1943), Associate Professor of Business Education, 
Emeritus (1958) 

B.A., Iowa; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia 

Stella Louise Weyl (1950), Assistant Professor of Commercial Studies 

B.A., South Dakota; M.S., Tennessee 

Shirley Blue Whitaker (1960), Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., M.A., Duke 

iEsTHER Boyd White (1957), Instructor in Health 

B.A., Arkansas A. and M.; M.S., Louisiana State; M.P.H., North Carolina; 
Ed.D., Louisiana State 

Josie Nance White (1951), Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.Ed., North 
Carolina; Ph.D., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Velma Louise Whitlock (1944) , Associate Professor of Business 
Education 

B.S., Oregon State; M.S., Tennessee 

Maude Ferrell Williams (1927), Associate Professor of Physiology, 
Emeritus (1962) 
B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Illinois 

Alice Jackson Willingham (1958), Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., East Carolina; M.S.H.E., Woman's College of the University of North 
Carolina 

George P. Wilson (1927), Professor of English, Emeritus (1956) 

B.A., North Carolina; M.A., Columbia 

Gordon James Wilson (1963), Assistant Professor of Music 

B.Mus., B.A., Birmingham-Southern; M.Mus., Florida State; A.Mus.D., Michigan 

2 James F. Wilson (1964), Professor of Biology 

B.S., Southern Illinois; M.S., Iowa State; Ph.D., Stanford 

Anne B. Worsley (1963), Instructor in Commercial Studies 

B.S.S.A., M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Lenoir Chambers Wright (1953), Associate Professor of History 

B.A., North Carolina; B.A., M.A., Oxford; LL.B., Harvard; M.A., Ph. D., 
Columbia 

Thomas F. Wright (1963), Instructor in English 

B.A., Wofford; M.A., North Carolina 

3 Chisaburoh F. Yamada (1963), Visiting Lecturer in Art 

Ph.D., Berlin University 

Michael J. Yavenditti (1963), Instructor in History 

B.A., Occidental; M.A., North Carolina 

3 Virginia Ford Zenke (1962), Instructor in Art 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

*Leave of absence, first semester; returned as assistant professor, second semester. 
2 Second semester. 
3 First semester. 



267 



University op North Carolina at Greensboro 

ACADEMIC ADVISERS 
Academic Class Advisers 

Mrs. Tommie Lou Smith, B.A., M.A., Associate Dean 
Miss Helen Burns, B.A., M.A., Freshman 
Mrs. Grace M. Keziah, B.A., M.A., Sophomore 
Miss Nancy Ann Porter, B.S., M.Ed., Junior 
Miss Frances Falck, B.A., M.Ed., Senior 

Vocational Guidance 

Julia H. Heinlein, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Reading Clinic 

Grace R. James, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

LIBRARY STAFF 

. Charles Marshall Adams (1945), Librarian, College Archivist, 
Professor 

B.A., Amherst; B.S. in L.S., M.A., Columbia 

'; Mildred Lee Carr (1958), Assistant Circulation Librarian 

B.A., William and Mary; B.S. in L.S., Columbia 

Grace Betts Farrior (1957), Assistant Librarian 

B.A., Meredith; M.S. in L.S., North Carolina 

, Elizabeth Jerome Holder (1963) , Head Reference Librarian 

B.A., Salem; M.S. in L.S., North Carolina 

, Marjorie Jane Hood (1929), Head Circulation Librarian, 
Assistant College Archivist 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women; B.S. in L.S., Emory 

i Margaret Kendrick Horney (1961), Assistant Catalog Librarian 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; B.S. in L.S., 
Columbia 

y Ada Asttn Josey (1963), Assistant Catalog Librarian 

B.S., Georgia; M.S. in L.S., North Carolina 

Marjorie Whittington Memory (1949) , Serials Librarian 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

^VIRGINIA Harris Miller (1961), Assistant Catalog Librarian 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; B.S. in L.S., 
North Carolina 

. Vivian Moose (1947), Head Catalog Librarian 

B.S., Lenoir Rhyne; B.S. in L.S., North Carolina 
*First semester, 1963-64. 

268 



Faculty 
- Ruth Robertson Prince (1963), Assistant Circulation Librarian 

B.A., Meredith; B.S. in L.S., North Carolina 

„ Mary Robert Sea well (1945), Bibliographer and Reference 
Librarian 

B.A., Meredith; B.A. in L.S., North Carolina 

Janet Williams Anderson (1960), Library Assistant, Catalog 
Department 

Campbell; Meredith 

Ruth Capel Blue (1960), Library Assistant, Order Department 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Sarah Clegg Graves (1962), Library Assistant, Documents 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Mary Walker Mallison (1953), Library Assistant, Order 
Department 

Dossie Phillips (1963), Library Assistant, Order Department 

B.A., B.M., North Carolina 

Jacqueline Hendrix Quigley (1963), Library Assistant, 
Circulation Department 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Rosemary Reed Troxler (1962), Library Assistant, Circulation 
Department 

Greensboro College 

Rita S. Williams (1963), Library Assistant, Catalog 
Department 

Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

X.Shirley Lee Windham (1957), Library Assistant, Catalog 
Department 

B.A., Greensboro 

Annette H. Workman (1963), Library Assistant, Serials 
Department 

Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

COUNSELORS IN RESIDENCE HALLS 

Della Arthur (1962), Grogan West Hall 

Converse; Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Aldine Scott Beale (1960), Bailey Hall 

Farmville State Teachers College 

Nell Steele Bigler (1958), Ragsdale Hall 

B.S., Pittsburgh 

Anne Fulton Carter (1936), Mendenhall Hall 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Helen Boren Cloninger (1959), Strong Hall 

Converse; Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 



269 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
Ruth Kichline Cornell (1961), Cotten Hall 

B.S., Mansfield 

Lillian Cunningham (1943), Jamison Hall 

B.A., Converse 

Mary Grice Duff (1960), Hinshaw Hall 

Longwood 

Lowell Steele Estes (1959), Shaw Hall 

B.A., Tift 

Frances Elizabeth Falck (1956), Coit Hall 

B.A., Iowa; M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Eloise Downing George (1960), Grogan East Hall 

B.A., Ohio State 

Carlynne Perrow Gillette (1961), South Spencer Hall 

B.A., Longwood 

Josephine Jennings Gross (1963), Reynolds South Hall 

University of Arizona 

Ruth Bruce Johnson (1959), Reynolds North Hall 

B.A., Meredith 

Gladys Williams Knight (1963), North Spencer Hall 

Davis-Wagoner College 

Ruth Calista Lott (1963), Mary Foust Hall 

B.S., Cornell 

Dessa Helms McGwier (1963), Guilford Hall 

Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Nancy Melvin (1957), Weil Hall 

B.S., Guilford 

Isabel Mildred Outlaw (1958), Gray Hall 

B.A., Syracuse 

Mallie Bennett Penry (1963), Graduate Hall 

Mars Hill College; Salem College; The University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro 

Anne Powell (1963), Winfield Hall 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., Boston 
University 

Lucy Allen White (1955), Moore Hall 

Converse; Louisburg 



OTHER STAFF 

Olivia Arernethy (1963), Physician 

B.A., North Carolina; M.D., Medical College of Virginia 

Alberta Lovette Adams (1958), Food Service Supervisor 
Margaret Ijames Alexander (1960), Assistant, Residence Halls 



270 



Faculty 



Louis Lynn Allison (1951), Buildings Superintendent 

Patricia Upchurch Alspaugh (1958), Reportorial Assistant, 
News Bureau 

William Alspaugh (1957), Television Production Director 

Helen Bewley Ashby (1959), Assistant Director, The Institute for 
Child and Family Development 

B.A., Maryville; M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Charles D. Barbour (1963), Data Processing Manager 

Charles Owen Bell (1959), Superintendent of Landscaping and 
Grounds 

B.S., Ohio State 

Dock Curtis (1953), Associate College Physician 

B.A., Cornell; M.D., Arkansas 

E. Ashley Dawes (1962), Television Production Director 
Maynard Gardner French (1957), Manager of Ay cock Auditorium 

B.A., Maine; M.A., M.F.A., Western Reserve; Certificate, School of Radio and 
Television Techniques, New York City 

Ruth Jessup (1951), Accounting Clerk 

C.C., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Dorothea Johnson (1961), Assistant to the Director, Elliott Hall 

B.S.H.E., Woman's College 

Gordon Lavers (1963) , Audio-Visual Technician 
Edith Inez McCain (1963), Food Service Supervisor 
Clara M. Meyers (1961), Assistant, Residence Halls 

Hiwassee Junior College 

Carroll Walker Miller (1962), Food Service Supervisor 

B.S.H.E., Woman's College 

Paula A. Osborne (1960), Administrative Secretary, Office of the 
Dean of the Faculty 

C.C., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Margaret Elizabeth Patterson (1956), Administrative Secretary, 
Office of the Dean of Students 

Helen Winslow Phillips (1961), Assistant Food Service Director 

B.S.H.E., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Gerald Ray Rumsey (1954), Plant Engineer 
Ruthe Shafer (1942), Cashier 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women 

Mary R. Smith (1963), Associate Physician 

M.B., B.S., London; M.P.H., Columbia 



271 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
Celia Varner Stowe (1960), Assist ant Food Service Director 

B.S.H.E., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Bennie T. Thompson (1962), Food Service Supervisor 

Louise Green Warden (1956), Administrative Secretary, Office of the 
Business Manager 

Terrell Weaver (1963), Assistant to Director, Elliott Hall 

B.S.S.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Julia White (1950), Head Nurse, Infirmary 

R.N., St. Leo's Hospital School of Nursing 

Janet S. Wolfe (1961), Administrative Secretary, Office of the 
Graduate School 

B.A., Syracuse 

Helen Pentecost Yoder (1954), Administrative Assistant, 
Office of the Chancellor 

Emil W. Young (1954), Director of Television 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 
(1963-1964) 

ELECTED: 

Academic Policies. Singletary, Chairman; Albanese (1964), Ander- 
ton (1966), Bardolph (1964), Bridgers (1964), Ferguson, J. (ap- 
pointed), Littlejohn (1966), Martus (1965), Mossman (appointed), 
Reardon (1965), Russell (1965), Shivers (1966), Taylor, K. (appointed). 

Curriculum. Kurland, Chairman (1964); Barineau (1965), Dawley 
(1965), England (1966), Felton (1964), Gagen (1965), Lewis (1966), 
McGee (1966), Street (1964). Ex officio members: Mossman, Price. 

Due Process. Bardolph, Chairman (1963) ; Littlejohn, Vice-Chair- 
man (1964); Hunter, E. (1965), Kennedy (1966), Shivers (1967). 

APPOINTED: 

Academic Progress of Students. Smith, T. L., Chairman; Anderton. 
Ex officio members: Mossman, Price. 

Admissions Policy. Berkeley, Chairman; Johnson, H., McGee, R., 
Ray. Ex officio members: Dunn, Mossman, Smith, T. L. 

Audio- Visual Aids. Reardon, Chairman; Felt, Middleton, Tucker, J. 
Ex officio member: Wilkinson, E. 

Buildings and Grounds. Griffin, Chairman; Eberhart, Hathaway, 
Kehoe, Luce, Middleton. Ex officio members: Ferguson, H., Gurley, 
Taylor, K. 



272 



Faculty 

Calendar and Scheduling. Price, Ex officio, Chairman; Davis, D., 
Felt, Felton, Franklin. Other ex officio members: Ferguson, J., Kennedy, 
Mossman, Taylor, K. 

Campus Stores. Sievers, Chairman; Cunningham, Weyl. Ex officio 
member: Ferguson, H. 

Catalogue and Recruitment Publications. Allen, R., Chairman; 
Thrush, Smith, L. Ex officio members: Dunn, Hamer, Mossman, Price. 

Commencement. Shipton, Chairman (ex officio) ; Clutts, Luce, Schul. 
Other ex officio members: Bridgers, Ferguson, J., Mossman, Parrish, B., 
Price, Taylor, K. 

Elections. Allen, R., Chairman; Jones, D., Marble. 

Extension. Johnson, H., Chairman; Reardon, Shivers, Stephens, R. 
Ex officio members: Ferguson, J., Howe, Mossman, Shipton. 

Faculty Government. Littlejohn, Chairman; Charles, Connelly, 
Cowling, Dozier, Sands, Wright, L. 

Faculty Scholarship. Bridgers, Chairman; Hege, J., Hunter, E. 

Faculty Welfare. Schriver, Chairman; Leonard, Russell. Ex officio 
member: Ferguson, H. 

Fulbright Student Applicants (Screening Committee). Kurland, 
Chairman; Guiney, Miller, M. Ex officio member: Smith, T. L. 

Gardner Award. Barineau, Chairman; Bridgers, Hennis, Morgan, 
P., Schaeffer, F., Sedgwick. 

Graduate Administrative Board. Ferguson, J., Chairman; Bryant, 
Bardolph, Duffy, Eberhart, Littlejohn, Martus, Rigsby, Russell, Sperry. 
Ex officio member: Mossman. 

Harriet Elliott Lectures in the Social Sciences. Kurland, 
Chairman ; Dozier, Kupf erer, Wright, L. 

Honorary Degrees. Rigsby, Chairman; Albanese, Farinholt, Martus, 
Robinson, Smith, K. Ex officio members: Mossman, Taylor, K. 

Honors Council. Davies, Chairman; Anderton, Bardolph, Bryant, 
Carpenter, Hennis, Lewis, A., Russell. 

International Studies. Wright, L., Chairman; Blend, Davies, 
Dozier, Kupferer, Parker. 

Lecture-Entertainment. Taylor, K., Ex officio Chairman; Baecker, 
Couch, Darnell, R., French, Gagen, Moomaw. Other ex officio member: 
Prondecki. 

Library. Beeler, Chairman; Duffy, Johnson, M. F., Morrison, Sperry, 
Stephens, R. Ex officio members: Adams, C, Ferguson, J., Mossman. 

273 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Nursing Education. Dawley, Chairman; Felton, Schaeffer, F. Ex 
officio members: Abernethy, Boehret, Mossman. 

Piney Lake Recreation Center. Connelly, Chairman; Dawley, 
Duncan, Ferguson, H., Moore, G. A. Ex officio members: Martus, 
Taylor, K. 

Pre- Professional Education For Medicine. Harpster, Chairman; 
Anderton, Farinholt, Schaeffer, F. Ex officio member: Abernethy. 

Reviewing. Burgess, Chairman; Canaday, Cox, Falck, Jones, D., 
Hege, J. 

Research Council. Ferguson, J., Chairman (ex officio) ; Carpenter, 
Eberhart, Keeney, Parker, Rigsby, Smith, K. Other ex officio members: 
Adams, C, Mossman. 

Scholarships and Student Aid. Taylor, Chairman (ex officio); 
Franklin, Putzel, Ulrich. Other ex officio members: Dunn, Hamer, 
Hawkins, Smith, T. L. 

Social. Hunter, M., Chairman; Bell, Brashear J., Canaday, Cunning- 
ham, Greene, Hawkins, Jones, J. Ash, Jones, S., White, N. Ex officio 
members: Parrish, B., Phillips, H. 

Special Examinations. Baecker, Chairman; Burns, Falck, Mossman, 
Porter, Smith, T. L. 

Summer Session Council. Kennedy, Chairman; Bardolph, Bryant, 
Ferguson, H., Ferguson, J., Howe, Littlejohn, Lowe, Martus, Mossman, 
Price, Rigsby, Shipton, Taylor, K. 

Teacher Education Council. Mossman, Chairman; Howe, Vice- 
Chairman; Albanese, Bardolph, Bryant, Carpenter, Eberhart, Lewis, A., 
Littlejohn, Martus, Rigsby, Smith, K., Thrush. 

Television Programming. Reardon, Chairman; Cox, England, 
French, Schul. Ex officio members: Ferguson, J., Hamer, Mossman, 
Shipton, Young. 

Traffic. Charles, Chairman; Beeler, Hathaway, Taylor, K. 

Weil Fellowship. Taylor, Chairman (ex officio) ; Allen, D., Laine, 
Schaeffer, F. Other ex officio members: Mossman, Smith, T. L. 

EX OFFICIO: 

Acedemic and Personnel. Smith, T. L., Chairman; Abernethy, 
Burns, Falck, Keziah, Mossman, Porter, Price, Taylor, K. 

Campus Safety and Security. Ferguson, H., Chairman; Abernethy, 
Adams, C, Gurley, Phillips, H., Taylor, K. 

Health Services. Abernethy, Chairman; Ferguson, H., Taylor, K. 

Use of Campus Buildings. Shipton, Chairman; Ferguson, H., 
Taylor, K. 

274 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Absences 101, 102 

Academic advisers 89, 268 

Academic and Personnel Committee 89 

Academic regulations 89 

Accreditation and membership 12, 59 

Administrative Board, the (Graduate School) 217 

Admission of students 

to the University 49 

to the Commercial Course 49, 53 

of former students 54 

general information 49 

to undergraduate curricula 49 

transfer students 53 

Advanced Placement 51 

Advisers, see Class Advisers and academic advisers 

Alumnae Association 21 

Art 108 

Art Gallery 14 

Astronomy 185 

Attendance, class 101, 102 

Auditing courses 91 

Bachelor of Arts degree 59 

Bachelor of Fine Arts degree 75 

Bachelor of Music 76, 77 

Bachelor of Science in 

Business Education and Secretarial Administration 73 

Home Economics 70 

Physical Education 72 

Bachelor of Science degrees, 

curricula in 70 

requirements for 70 

Biology, Department of 112 

Buildings and grounds 12 

Business Education and Secretarial Administration, 

curricula in 73 

Department of 116 

Master's degree in 230 

Calendar 3 

Change of course 91 

Chemistry 121 

Child Development and Family Relationships 174 

Class attendance 101, 102 

Class, required number of students for 107 

Class Advisers 89, 268 

Classical Civilization 123 

Classification of students 91 

Clubs 20 

Commercial Department 125 

Committees of the faculty 272 

Continuing in the University 95 

Correspondence credits 97 

Counseling 89 

Counselors in residence halls 269 

Course, change of 91 

275 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 



page 

Course examinations 98 

Course load 90 

Courses of instruction 107 

Creative Arts 229 

Credits 90 

Curry School 134 

Deficiencies 92 

Degrees 

conferred in 1960 241 

general information 59 

general requirements for 60 

kinds granted 12, 59 

requirements for 

Bachelor of Arts 59 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 75 

Bachelor of Music 76 

Bachelor of Science 73 

Doctor of Philosophy 223 

Master's 85 

requirements for Second Baccalaureate Degree 104 

Development office 23 

Drama and Speech 126 

Dropping Courses 91 

Dual registration, undergraduate and graduate 103 

Economics and Business Administration 131 

Education 

courses in 134 

Master's degree 231 

School of 134 

Electives in Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Music 

courses for Bachelor of Arts students 78 

Elementary Education, courses in 134 

Elementary Education Degree 64 

English 145, 232 

Enrollment summary 241 

Entrance deficiencies 92 

Examinations 

course 98 

entrance . 51 

Placement 98 

re-examinations 100 

semester 98 

special 98 

Expenses 27, 227 

Extension 

courses 55, 237 

credits 97 

Division of 55 

Faculty and staff 

Fees 28, 228 

Fee payments 28 

Financial aid 35 

Fine Arts, 

curricula in 75 

degrees in 75, 229 



276 



Index 



page 

French 206 

Freshman-Sophomore requirements 62 

Friends of the Library 13 

General Information 107 

Geography 151 

German and Russian 154 

Golden chain 20 

Grade of courses 59, 107 

Grade reports 95 

Grades and quality points 92 

Grading symbols 92, 95 

Graduate School 217 

curricula 229 

expenses 227 

organization 217 

regulations 218 

Graduation 

with honors 103 

requirements 96 

residence requirements 103 

Greek 124 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 156 

Service in 17 

History of the University 11 

History and Political Science 167 

Home Economics 

courses in 172 

curricula in 70 

Foundation 22 

Master's degree in 173, 233 

School of 149 

Honors, graduation with 103 

Honor Roll 96 

Honors Work 82 

Incompletes 94 

Infirmary 17 

Institute for Child and Family Development 23 

Interdepartmental majors 64 

Inter- Faith Council 18 

International Studies 80 

Italian 209 

Junior-Senior requirements 63 

Junior year abroad 85 

Laboratory technician 67 

Latin 123 

Lectures and concerts 15 

Library 13 

Staff 268 

Loan funds 44 

Majors 61 

Master's degree 85, 221 

Mathematics 183 

Music 

courses in 186 

curricula in 76 



277 



University of North Carolina at Greensboro 



page 

degrees in 76 

fees 31 

organizations 16 

recitals 197 

School of 186 

National Science Foundation Institute for Teachers 237 

News Bureau 23 

Nursing Education 197 

courses 197 

curricula 79 

Officers 

of administration 7 

of the Graduate School 217 

of instruction 248 

other officers 270 

Organizations 19 

Orientation Week 89 

Part-time employment 46 

Payments 29 

Preprofessional study 66 

Preregistration 90 

Phi Beta Kappa 19 

Philosophy 198 

Physical Education, 

courses 157 

curricula 72 

Physical therapy 68 

Physics 199 

Placement Office 20 

Political Science 171 

Precollege Testing Program 51 

Pre-engineering 69 

Pre-Law 70 

Premedical program 66 

Preprofessional study 66 

Probational readmission 95 

Psychology 202 

Publications 21 

Quality points 92 

Reading Improvement 89 

Readmission, probational 95 

Recitals 197 

Recreation 19 

Recreation, Interdepartmental Major 65 

Re-examinations 100 

Refunds 32 

Registration 89 

Regulations, Academic 89 

Religion 18 

Research Council 238 

Residence halls 16 

Residence status 27 

Residence requirements 103 

Romance Languages 206 

Rooms, reservation of 50 



278 



Index 

page 

Russian 155 

Scholarships and Awards 35 

Secondary Education, courses in 137 

Secretarial Administration, see Business Education 

Self-help 46 

Senior requirements 63 

Social life 18 

Sociology and Anthropology 209 

Sophomore requirements 62 

Spanish 207 

Special examinations 9$ 

Special fees 30 

Special students 54 

Speech, see Drama and Speech 

Sports and recreation 19 

Standing committees of the faculty 272 

Statistical summaries 241 

Student aid 35 

Student Government 18 

Student health 17 

Student load 90 

Summer session 54 

Summer session credits 96 

Symbols used with courses 107 

Table of Contents 5 

Talented freshmen 8)5 

Television 14 

Textbooks 32 

Theatre, the University 15 

Training School, see Curry School 

Transcript of record 104 

Transfer students 53, 97 

Transfer credit 97 

Trustees 

Unclassified students 50 

Vocational Rehabilitation 46 

Vocational Guidance and Testing 89, 268 

Weatherspoon Art Gallery 14 

Withdrawal 91 



279 



m. 





>> 



1— Golf Hut 

2 — Coleman Gymnasium 

3 — Rosenthal Gymnasium 

4 — Shaw 

5 — Hinshaw 

6— Gray 

7— Bailey 

8 — Cotten 

9 — Jamison 
10— Coit 
11— Winfield 
12— Weil 
13— Moore 
14 — Strong 
15— Gove Infirmary 
16— Ragsdale 
17— Mendenhall 
18— Kirkland 
19— Woman's 
20 — Dining Halls 
21 — South Spencer 
22— North Spencer 
23 — New Guilford 
24 — Mary Foust 



LD I NGS 

25— Nursery School 
26— Dean of Students' Residence 
27 — Petty Building 
28— Home Management Houses 
29 — Stone 
30— WUNC-TV 
31 — Brown 

32 — Aycock Auditorium 
33— Mclver 
34 — Forney 
35 — Jackson Library 
36 — Old Infirmary 
37— Elliott Hall 
38 — Chancellor's Residence 
39 — Alumnae House 
40 — Soda Shop 
41— Foust (Administration) 
42— Curry School 
43 — Curry Homemaking Cottage 
44 — Staff Residences 
45 — Maintenance Shops 
46 — Heating Plant 
47 — Laundry 
—Patterson House 



COVER DESIGN BY SAUNDRA EVANS, B.F.A., 1962 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
AT GREENSBORO 



GREENSBORO; NORTH CAROLINA